Dec 01, 2022  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Courses numbered from 101–299 are lower-division courses, primarily for freshmen and sophomores; those numbered from 300–499 are upper-division courses, primarily for juniors and seniors. The numbers 296, 396, 496, and 596 designate individual study courses and are available for registration by prior arrangement with the course instructor and approval of the department chair.

The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the amount of credit each course carries. Variable credit courses include the minimum and maximum number of the credits within parentheses.

Not all of the courses are offered every quarter. Final confirmation of courses to be offered, information on new courses and programs, as well as a list of hours, instructor, titles of courses and places of class meetings, is available online in My CWU which can be accessed through the the CWU home page, and go to www.cwu.edu/registrar/course-information

 

Personal Financial Planning (PFP)

  
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    PFP 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 310 - Introduction to the Financial Planning Profession


    Description:
    Introduces the processes appropriate for entry into the personal financial planning (PFP) profession. Provides an overview of the skills and knowledge sets required to be a PFP professional including an outline of business models and practice management issues within the industry. Course will be offered every year (Fall and Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ECON 130 or MATH 130 or BUS 221 or MATH 153 with a C- or higher.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the Fitness Standards for Professional Financial Planner Candidates and Registrants
    • Explain the Code of Ethics and Professional Responsibility for CFP Professionals
    • Describe the Prqactice Standards employed during the financial planning process
    • Discuss the fiduciary standard and its importance to financial planning
    • Diagram the personal financia planning process
    • Prepare statements of financial positions and cash flows
    • Evaluate financial statements using ratios and growth rates.
    • Analyze cash inflows and outflows related to a current financial needs and long-term financial goals

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/16/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 386 - Information Technologies for Financial Planning


    Description:
    An overview of various financial planning software packages used in a modern financial planning firm.   Students will study in a self-motivated environment to become proficient in the requisite software packages. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in PFP 310 and BUS 102 or approved substitute and admission to a College of Business major.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the types of information and decision support systems used in the personal financial planning profession.
    • Explain the purpose of each of the major software categories to support financial planning activities.
    • Manage a hypothetical individual investment portfolio.
    • Analyze alternative investments that may be used to recommend to a prospective customer base on their assets and needs.
    • Propose how an individual’s current assets may be invested to achieve stated retirement goals.
    • Demonstrate how an industry-specific customer relationship management system can be used to pursue stated performance goals.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/6/2017

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 398 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 440 - Estate Planning


    Description:
    Applies gift, estate, and generation skipping transfer taxation rules to personal financial planning scenarios. Studies financial regulations and taxation policy. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in PFP 310 and admission to a College of Business major OR (a grade of C or higher in PFP 310 and declaration of a Personal Financial Planning Certificate).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Compare and contrast the most common types of tilting property
    • Describe the probate process, its advantages, disadvantages, and costs.
    • Explain the alternative methods of transferring property at death
    • Propose the most appropriate property transfer mechanism for a client’s situation
    • Diagram the components and relationships among estate planning documents used to facilitate the transfer of one’s assets.
    • Describe the roles of the parties used in estate planning including executor, trustee, power of attorney, beneficiary(ies), heirs, and guardians
    • Select the appropriate estate planning tools to meet a specific case client’s coals and objectives
    • Prepare a cash flow plan for maintaining a client’s estate from date of death to final distribution including payment of tax liabilities.
    • Compare the application of the different types of trusts including revocable, irrevocable, living, and testamentary trusts
    • Compare and contrast the components of charitable and non-charitable trusts
    • Diagnose the income tax consequences of a cast trust including deductions, exemptions, credits, tax rates, and penalties for non-compliance
    • Evaluate the income tax implications of trust income and distributions to beneficiaries
    • Distinguish the relationship between the marital deduction and the qualified interest trust
    • Choose the appropriate business transfer techniques based on specific scenarios
    • Compare the forms of postmortem financial planning.
    • Assess the impact of divorce and/or remarriage on an estate plan.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/5/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 450 - Insurance and Risk Management


    Description:
    Examines risk management and insurance planning for individual clients as well as employers of small corporations. Teaches the development of risk management and insurance plans with economic and behavioral theory. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in PFP 310 and admission to a College of Business major OR (a grade of C or higher in PFP 310 and declaration of a Personal Financial Planning Certificate).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the risk management process
    • Compare and contrast the primary risk management techniques available to clients
    • Explain how insurers use risk pooling to pay for losses incurred by policyholders
    • Distinguish among the factors that affect policyholder premiums
    • Differentiate between group and individual health insurance alternatives, including fee for service and managed care plans.
    • Describe alternatives for acquiring health coverage including COBRA and Medicaid
    • Distinguish between short-term and long-term disability plans.
    • Formulate a plan for meeting individual disability income needs
    • Compute the tax implications of paying for and receiving disability benefits
    • Propose a long-term care insurance plan based on needs, financial resources, policy coverage, and cost
    • Compare and contrast annuities (fixed and variable) with other investment alternatives.
    • Assess the most appropriate life insurance coverage to match a client’s circumstances
    • Estimate a client’s insurance needs using alternative approaches
    • Prepare an insurance needs analysis for a case client
    • Recommend appropriate insurance products, given a case client’s circumstances
    • Diagram the components of property and casualty insurance
    • Differentiate among the basic homeowners insurance (HO) forms and features
    • Evaluate the components of automobile insurance for potential property damage or liability exposures.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/5/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 460 - Retirement Planning


    Description:
    Examines the topics of retirement planning and retirement plans from both employer and individual client settings. Uses a case study approach to apply and integrate the material. Emphasizes the evaluation of financial alternatives. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in PFP 310 and admission to a College of Business major OR (a grade of C or higher in PFP 310 and declaration of a Personal Financial Planning Certificate).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe common assumptions used in analyzing retirement
    • Design a savings plan to maximize the probability of achieving a case client’s goals and mitigating longevity risk
    • Calculate the retirement funding and income distribution plans under varied scenarios
    • Explain work-to-retirement transitions and phased retirement
    • Describe the purpose and practices surrounding the Social Security System
    • Calculate the optimal date to begin receiving Social Security retirement benefits and the impact of the earnings test for a case client
    • Describe the Medicare program, including the payroll taxes and eligibility structure
    • Distinguish between the four parts of Medicare coverage related to benefits, out-of-pocket costs and alternative insurance options to cover the gaps in coverage.
    • Propose the proper Medicare coverage and any supplemental coverage based on client circumstances
    • Distinguish between qualified, government, non-qualified, and private tax-advantaged retirement plans
    • Compare the various types of defined benefit, defined contribution and individual retirement accounts
    • Differentiate between the various types of Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs)
    • Propose an appropriate IRA for a client’s needs.
    • Identify the factors that will affect the selection of a retirement plan for a business
    • Choose a qualified or non-qualified retirement plan given a business owner’s goals and objectives.
    • Discuss the rules and penalties regarding retirement plan distributions
    • Evaluate investments for both funding and retirement distribution purposes, considering the time horizon and risk tolerance of plan owners and beneficiaries.
    • Prepare an investment portfolio that minimizes retirement income risk
    • Describe how life insurance products may affect retirement plan decisions
    • Outline the factors a business owner should consider when creating a succession plan.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/5/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 475 - Financial Planning Investments


    Description:
    Financial resource investment theory and financial instruments most relevant to financial planning. Focus on understanding the differences in return distribution characteristics of available financial instruments and use of financial instruments within a household portfolio. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: A grade of C or higher in PFP 310 and admission to a College of Business major.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe and compare the investment characteristics of asset classes
    • Explain the appropriate use for each asset class and investment vehicle based investment goals.
    • Describe tax implications of holding and disposing of various security types or asset classes
    • Identify, measure, and differentiate between types of investments risks.
    • Explain the impact of low-probability economic events on portfolio design.
    • Estimate the expected risk and return using the Capital Asset Pricing Model for securities and portfolios
    • Calculate modern portfolio theory statistics in the assessment of securities and portfolios.
    • Explain the use of return distributions in portfolio structuring
    • Apply advanced analytic techniques to portfolio analysis.
    • Identify, measure, and interpret various approaches to determining investment returns.
    • Calculate and interpret risk-adjusted performance measures
    • Construct a portfolio associated with a specific investment goal.
    • Explain the role of portfolio rebalancing.
    • Recommend an asset allocation strategy consistent with a specified risk tolerance
    • Value a bond using discounted cash flow and explain how interest rates affect bond values.
    • Estimate the value of a stock using discounted cash flow, the CAPM, and price multiples.
    • Differentiate between fundamental and technical analysis.
    • Develop alternative strategies to meet investment objectives, time horizons, and risk tolerances.
    • Select an appropriate benchmark for assessing the value of portfolio management services.
    • Develop an appropriate Investment Policy Statement (IPS) for a client.
    • Apply duration and convexity in constructing a fixed income portfolio.
    • Construct a tax-efficient diversified portfolio based on a stated goal, risk preference and time horizon.
    • Calculate and communicate a client’s portfolio performance using different risk and return measures
    • Explain the role of alternative investment strategies such as buy-and-hold, immunization, core and satellite, passive (indexed) and active management techniques such as tactical allocation, market timing, and sector rotation
    • Evaluate how options and futures support investment risk management purposes.
    • Define and describe what qualifies as an alternative investment.
    • Explain asset class and describe the basic differences between the traditional asset classes and alternative asset classes
    • Explain the primary rationale and uses for alternative asset classes
    • Explain the potential advantages and disadvantages of utilizing alternative investment strategies
    • Explain how the incorporation of alternatives asset classes can affect both absolute and risk-adjusted portfolio returns

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/5/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 480 - Financial Planning Capstone


    Description:
    Develops the concept of a comprehensive plan. Reviews of each of the major aspects of financial planning in the context of a comprehensive case. Students will synthesize all information and create a comprehensive financial plan for a client. Analyzes the financial planning profession and the various types of financial planning models.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: a grade of C- or higher in PFP 310 AND PFP 440 AND PFP 450 AND PFP 460 AND (ACCT 303 or ACCT 340) AND (FIN 475 or PFP 475) and (admission to a College of Business major OR enrollment in the Personal Financial Planning Certificate).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the content found within the Financial Planning curriculum and effectively apply and integrate this information in the formulation of a financial plan
    • Effectively communicate the financial plan, both orally and in writing, including information based on research, peer, colleague or simulated client interaction and/or results emanating from synthesis of material
    • Collect all necessary and relevant qualitative and quantitative information required to develop a financial plan
    • Analyze personal financial situations, evaluating clients’ objectives, needs, and values to develop an appropriate strategy within the financial plan
    • Demonstrate logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches to a specific problem
    • Evaluate the impact of economic, political, and regulatory issues with regard to the financial plan
    • Apply the CFP Board Financial Planning Practice Standards to the financial planning process

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    PFP 490 - Personal Financial Planning Internship


    Description:
    An individualized, contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies focusing on personal financial planning related activities. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. Permission of department. May be repeated up to 20 credits. Grade will either be S or U. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: 2.8 or higher CWU cumulative gpa.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply learning in professional workplace environment
    • Demonstrate professional behavior in the workplace
    • Substantive discipline-based outcomes developed by individual students in consult with faculty advisor

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/19/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 493 - Personal Financial Planning Boot Camp


    Description:
    Supervised field experience seminar focused on personal financial planning related organizations and processes. On-location industry engagement. Education, training, and business skills application in industry setting. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Grade will either be S or U. Permission by instructor. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Prepare a research brief on each organization participating in the boot camp.
    • Exhibit professional behavior and appropriate business skills in industry setting.
    • Establish a professional network within the industry professionals.
    • llustrate an awareness of the organization(s) participating in the boot camp.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/19/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 496 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 498 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PFP 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Philosophy (PHIL)

  
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    PHIL 101 - Philosophical Inquiry


    Description:
    Introduces students to the basic concepts, questions, and methods of philosophical inquiry. Topics may include free will and responsibility, knowledge and skepticism, the nature of the divine, moral reasoning, and human rights and social justice. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer). AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W). K5 - Humanities

    General Education Pathways: P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine the basic methods of the philosophical tradition: critical thinking and argumentative writing
    • Analyze diverse perspectives on key issues in philosophy, such as morality, free will and responsibility, knowledge, and justice
    • Evaluate the strength of the arguments that support those perspectives
    • Examine their own conceptual and normative presuppositions
    • Defend their own reasoned positions on these issues, in argumentative writing and in class discussion

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/16/2017

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PHIL 102 - Knowledge, Mind and Reality (Put on reserve 9/16/19)


    Description:
    An introduction to philosophy, focusing on the core fields of epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind. Topics may include belief, rationality, skepticism, the nature of mind, free will, personal identify, and time. (Put on reserve 9/16/19, will go inactive 8/24/22)

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Show awareness of assumptions about fundamental topics such as free will, or personal identity, or the relation between mind and brain; and of how those assumptions shape one’s perspective, via one’s language, perceptions, and values.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of, and an ability to express, some representative theories on these fundamental topics.
    • Show awareness of how different beliefs or theories about these fundamental topics can influence one’s perspective on and behavior in the world, concerning both oneself and other people.
    • Identify the philosophical questions that authors address, and demonstrate an understanding of how the authors answer those questions. Identify how those answers relate to one’s own views, or can help to clarify those views.
    • Explain and justify one’s own position on these fundamental topics.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PHIL 103 - What Is Enlightenment?


    Description:
    An introduction to the study of philosophy through the issue of how we should live, with a particular focus on how we define social justice. Course will be offered every year (Fall).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K5 - Humanities

    General Education Pathways: P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine diverse definitions of the concept of enlightenment from multiple global traditions
    • Examine what the concept of social justice is, especially around issues of gender and race
    • Analyze why social justice and other forms of enlightenment are difficult to achieve
    • Evaluate the arguments for these positions
    • Examine how these diverse perspectives challenge their own conceptual and normative presuppositions on these issues
    • Identify and justify their own positions on these issues, in class discussion and in argumentative writing

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/7/2017

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PHIL 104 - Moral Controversies


    Description:
    An introduction to moral reasoning through the study of current ethical problems. Topics may include abortion, capital punishment, consumerism, immigration, sexual ethics, killing in war, and/or torture. AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W). Formerly PHIL 210, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W). K5 - Humanities

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

     

    • Identify the philosophical questions addressed in class and describe how major positions on these questions have changed over time while paying specific attention to issues of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and class.

    • Identify how a liberal political system introduces specific moral problems that confront Western-style democracies and their citizens.

    • Distinguish major positions on pressing moral issues and describe arguments offered for or against these positions.

    • Explain the arguments presented in course readings, compare those arguments to one’s own lived experience.

    • Evaluate arguments and identify the strengths and weaknesses of those arguments.

    • Use philosophical ethics to interrogate, analyze, and evaluate one’s own positions on major ethical issues.


    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/16/2017

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
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    PHIL 105 - The Meaning of Life


    Description:
    An exploration of the meaning of life from diverse philosophical traditions. Topics may include hedonism versus pessimism, theism, scientific humanism, and existentialism. Formerly PHIL 115, students may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern (Spring).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K5 - Humanities

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

     

    • Recognize and evaluate arguments regarding the meaning of life in a variety of philosophical approaches, from Eastern and Western philosophical traditions, including hedonism, pessimism, thesis, scientific humanism, and existentialism.
    • Compare the authors’ philosophical assumptions to your own in order to identify shared and differing personal and cultural assumptions regarding the meaning of life.
    • Identify how having a sense of purpose affects personal psychological and physical well-being, and how one’s psychological and physical well-being affects our sense of purpose.
    • Identify social policies that impact our personal sense of purpose and develop concrete policy proposals to improve societal well-being.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/7/2017

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
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    PHIL 106 - Asian Philosophy


    Description:
    Examination of selected classical and/or contemporary issues and questions in Chinese, Japanese and Indian philosophy. AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W). Formerly PHIL 209, students may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern (Fall, Winter, Spring).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W). K4 - Global Dynamics

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being, P5 Sustainability

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Articulate an understanding of the development of the major philosophic traditions of Asia within their contexts of origin.
    • Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge of the primary tenets and symbolic systems of Asian philosophy as they relate to the health & well-being of yourself and the planet.
    • Explain how sustainability relates to our lives and values from an Asian perspective.
    • Explain how our actions impact issues of sustainability at individual, community, organizational and societal levels.
    • Demonstrate a recognition of the relationship between personal, social, professional, and economic well-being.
    • Appraise key factors and strategies that propagate an individual’s personal, social, and professional future well-being.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/4/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PHIL 107 - Political Philosophy and Social Democracy


    Description:
    A critical exploration of major cultural trends in Western social democracies through the lens of historical and contemporary political philosophies. Topics covered include immigration, the distribution of wealth and income, and multicultural citizenship. Course will be offered every year (Winter, Spring).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K2 - Community, Culture, & Citizenship

    General Education Pathways: P1 Civic & Community Engagement

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe various philosophical theories of citizenship and the state. 
    • Describe the historical events and cultural movements that influenced the development of contemporary western political thought.
    • Identify the ethical and metaphysical assumptions that underlie various philosophical theories of citizenship and the state.
    • Identify the influence of discussed philosophical systems on contemporary systems of government.
    • Apply theories of citizenship and the state to contemporary political issues and evaluate contemporary systems of government in light of discussed theories of citizenship in the state.
    • Create and describe a personal theory of the requirements of citizenship rooted in some of the discussed theories.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/21/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PHIL 110 - Beyond Belief? Exploring the Fringe and the Paranormal


    Description:
    Academic reading and writing with an emphasis on the social sciences, via a focus on beliefs in fringe phenomena (e.g. ghosts, ESP, alien abduction). Learning to consider evidence, evaluate arguments, and recognize sources of bias.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequiste: appropriate standardized test scores, or satisfactory completion of ENG 100T.

     

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: FYE2 - Academic Writing I: Critical Reading & Responding

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze and synthesize claims made about paranormal and fringe phenomena from an objective, scientific perspective; and in particular, use inference to the best explanation to evaluate these claims.
    • Identify and evaluate the evidence that a phenomenon did (or did not) occur, rather than demanding proof that it did (or did not) occur; and explain why demanding proof is obstructive and unnecessary.
    • Locate relevant texts about paranormal and fringe phenomena; read these texts critically and rhetorically, and summarize them objectively, accurately, and ethically.
    • Recognize when various cognitive biases and errors might be influencing someone’s (including your own) thinking about a reported paranormal or fringe phenomenon.
    • Express ideas in clear and coherent academic prose, and cite and document sources precisely and effectively.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/2/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
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    PHIL 111 - Writing and Power: Authority, Oppression, and Resistance


    Description:
    An introduction to the skills of academic research and argumentative writing, through the study writing as a form of empowerment and resistance to oppression – primarily in the context of gender, race, and colonialism.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: students must have appropriate test scores or have satisfactorily completed ENG100T.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: FYE2 - Academic Writing I: Critical Reading & Responding

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • analyze works in a variety of genres on the link between authority and writing.
    • identify and evaluate arguments in those works.
    • argue for a thesis, based on independent research and analysis of texts.
    • use clear, grammatically correct academic prose.
    • demonstrate information literacy by locating reliable academic sources relevant to the particular topic of their final project, and by citing those sources properly.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/23/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    PHIL 150 - Critical Thinking


    Description:
    This course will focus on informal logic: understanding and evaluating arguments in ordinary language. Students will learn to read, write, and think critically. Basic Skills 5 - Reasoning.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: Basic Skills 5 - Reasoning.

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Accurately summarize an argument contained in a prose passage, identifying its thesis, premises, and assumptions.
    • State the distinction between the truth of an argument’s premises and the validity and strength of its reasoning; and display awareness of this distinction in one’s writing.
    • Identify whether a given argument is deductive or inductive, and accordingly evaluate it for either validity or soundness or for strength and cogency; and recognize whether it commits any common argumentative fallacies.
    • Identify the logical form (propositional or categorical) of English statements and arguments; be able to exhibit that form by symbolization; and be able to use that form to determine the validity of arguments.
    • Display, in one’s writing, an awareness of one’s assumptions, and a willingness to question them; and hence be able to engage seriously and respectfully with others who disagree with those assumptions.
    • Take a reasoned position on a complex question while acknowledging that one’s position might be incorrect - but still avoid collapse into a default relativism on which “it’s all a matter of opinion”.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PHIL 151 - Arguments about Life and Death


    Description:
    This course will cultivate critical thinking skills in examining arguments about life and death: defining what death is, whether death is something to be feared, and the moral and legal issues around physician-assisted suicide.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: students must achieve a C- or higher in Academic Writing I prior to taking Academic Writing II.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K1 - Academic Writing II: Reasoning & Research

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Accurately analyze arguments contained in prose passages concerning life and death, identifying their premises and conclusions
    • Distinguish between the truth of an argument’s premises and the validity or strength of its reasoning, and evaluate that strength or validity
    • Craft a strong argument for a position on a complex question concerning life and death
    • Identify and synthesize high-quality sources and use them effectively in support of an argument, and cite and document sources according to MLA guidelines
    • Craft prose that conforms to academic expectations regarding rhetorical effectiveness: clarity, coherence, unity, style, and meaning
    • Identify core concepts and positions in debates around life and death, including: whether death is to be feared, how to define death, and whether assisted suicide is morally or constitutionally justified.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/6/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    PHIL 152 - Arguments about Healthcare


    Description:
    This course will cultivate critical thinking skills through the examination of arguments about healthcare, including whether there is a right to healthcare, the social determinants of health, and public policies designed to provide healthcare. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K1 - Academic Writing II: Reasoning & Research

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Accurately analyze arguments contained in prose writing on healthcare issues, especially regarding the supposed right to healthcare, identifying their premises and conclusions.
    • Distinguish between the truth of an argument’s premises and the validity or strength of its reasoning, and evaluate that strength or validity.
    • Craft a strong argument (one which is adequately supported by evidence) for a position regarding the government’s provision of healthcare for its citizens.
    • Identify and synthesize high-quality sources and use them effectively in support of an argument, and cite and document those sources using MLA guidelines.
    • Craft prose that conforms to academic expectations regarding rhetorical effectiveness: clarity, coherence, unity, style, and meaning.
    • Appraise arguments for and against single-payer healthcare system, the Affordable Care Act, and a libertarian approach.
    • Identify the major contributors to health outcomes, including the social and psychological determinants of health.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/21/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 153 - Arguments about Social Issues


    Description:
    This course will cultivate critical thinking skills through the examination of arguments about pressing social issues. Examples may include (but are not limited to) freedom of speech, environmental preservation, identity politics, and firearm laws. 

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: students must achieve a C- or higher in Academic Writing I prior to taking Academic Writing II.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K1 - Academic Writing II: Reasoning & Research

    General Education Pathways: P1 Civic & Community Engagement

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Accurately analyze arguments contained in prose writing on social issues, identifying their premises and conclusions.
    • Distinguish between the truth of an argument’s premises and the validity or strength of its reasoning, and evaluate that strength or validity.
    • Craft a strong argument (one which is adequately supported by evidence) for a position on a complex question concerning a social issue.
    • Identify and synthesize high-quality sources and use them effectively in support of an argument, and cite and document those sources using the guidelines of a specific style manual.
    • Craft prose that conforms to academic expectations regarding clarity, coherence, unity, style, and meaning.
    • Apply research and theory to the problems posed by social issues such as (but not limited to) freedom of speech, environmental preservation, identity politics, and firearm laws.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/20/2020

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg, Online Winter Locations: Ellensburg, Online Spring Locations: Ellensburg, Online Summer Locations: Online
  
  •  

    PHIL 201 - Introduction to Logic (Put on reserve 9/16/19)


    Description:
    Formal principles, methods and techniques for analyzing, constructing, and evaluating arguments. Topics include validity, soundness, truth tables, Venn diagrams, syllogisms, and logical symbolism. Basic Skills 5 - Reasoning. (Put on reserve 9/16/19, will go inactive 8/24/22)

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: Basic Skills 5 - Reasoning.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 251 - Introduction to Formal Logic


    Description:
    An introduction to formal logic, focusing on propositional and predicate calculus. Logical operators, symbolization, truth functions, truth tables, natural deduction (including conditional and direct proofs), and quantifiers. Formerly PHIL 307, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Symbolize English statements into formal logic, using the propositional and predicate calculus.
    • Classify and compare statements, and determine validity of arguments, by using the truth table method – for both the propositional and predicate calculus.
    • Use the method of natural deduction to derive the conclusions of valid arguments, in both the propositional and predicate calculus.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/9/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    PHIL 298 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 299 - Seminar


    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 302 - Ethical Theory


    Description:
    Offers an overview of the content and justification of historical approaches to ethical theory. Includes a critical assessment of those theories and a discussion of current approaches to ethical theory.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain and analyses the content of three major ethical theories: Kantianism, Utilitarianism, and Virtue Ethics.
    • Identify the foundational assumptions that each of these theories rests upon.
    • Apply the major ethical theories to issues in contemporary society.
    • Articulate criticisms of the major ethical theories.
    • Identify and explain contemporary movements in ethical theory (for example feminist ethics, contractualism, value theory, error theory, emotivism, etc.).
    • Explain how contemporary movements in ethical theory are a response to criticisms of both the content and assumptions of the major ethical theories.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 304 - Business Ethics


    Description:
    Ethical problems that arise in contemporary business practices and the relevance of recent ethical theory to these problems.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the moral issues involved in affirmative action, drug testing, whistle blowing, and environmental policy.
    • Identify the characteristics of moral agents as they are relevant to collective entities such as corporations.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the individual’s responsibilities as part of a corporation, both to the corporation itself and to society at large.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    PHIL 305 - Philosophy of Religion


    Description:
    Fundamental assumptions and issues in religious activity and thought; types of religious philosophy.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine and critically evaluate major issues in religious philosophy (such as epistemology, nature of evil, interreligious dialogue, proofs of the divine, etc)
    • Critically assess philosophical positions taken by representative thinkers and traditions for their implications, plausibility and applicability to contemporary discussions on the philosophy of religion.
    • Research, formulate and defend an interpretation and critique of various philosophical perspectives on religion.
    • Develop analytical, reading and writing skills.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    ND

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 306 - Environmental Ethics


    Description:
    An examination of various positions on the human relationship with the natural environment, from ancient and contemporary, western and non-western, as well as interdisciplinary perspectives. AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W).

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify basic philosophical positions on the human relationship with the natural environment.
    • Identify philosophical positions in relation to different cultural tradtions.
    • Critically evaluate various positions on the human relationship with the natural environment.
    • Develop students’ own view on issues in environmental ethics.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/5/2004

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 308 - Medical Ethics


    Description:
    Explores ethical issues arising in a medical context, such as the allocation of scarce medical resources and health care, patient confidentiality , advance directives, human experimentation, and physician-assisted suicide.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and explore connections between the theoretical principles and practical implications involved in a number of issues in medical ethics
    • Identify how ethics, law, and social policy are related to one another
    • Demonstrate strong critical thinking skills and evaluate their own and others’ moral positions
    • Discuss ethical issues openly, respectfully, and knowledgeably with those from different backgrounds and perspectives.
    • Demonstrate the ability to investigate problems new to themselves, draw conclusions, and evaluate source materials utilized in these investigations

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/4/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 314 - American Wilderness Philosophy


    Description:
    An exploration of the wilderness tradition in American philosophy. Topics include the value of wilderness areas, outdoor recreation, hunting, and fishing; back to the land movements; and current proposals to “rewild” built environments. Course will be offered on odd numbered years (Spring).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify various themes and focuses in wilderness thinking (conservation, preservation, re-wilding, etc).
    • Identify contemporary environmental issues to which wilderness philosophy is particularly relevant.
    • Apply themes from wilderness philosophy and writings to contemporary environmental issues.
    • Evaluate the ability of wilderness philosophy to contribute to contemporary environmental issues.
    • Distinguish wilderness philosophy from broader environmental movements.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/19/2017

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 317 - Philosophy of Technology


    Description:
    An examination of philosophical approaches to contemporary technologies. Topics may include robotics, digital games, virtual worlds, nanotechnology, human enhancement, and mobile technology. Course will be offered on even numbered years (Spring).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify philosophical problems related to existing and emerging technologies.
    • Explain major positions in the philosophy of technology.
    • Apply arguments in the philosophy of technology to contemporary technology usage.
    • Discuss how changes in technology impact and alter human experience.
    • Evaluate one’s own technology usage and the usage of others from a philosophical perspective.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 324 - Philosophy and Science Fiction


    Description:
    Covers issues in analytic philosophy via examination of science fiction works. Topics may include skepticism, free will, personal identity, artificial intelligence, machine ethics, transhumanism, genetic engineering and time travel.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine and critically analyze issues in contemporary philosophy that are raised in science fiction works (books, short stories, films, television).
    • Recognize and describe the treatment of these philosophical issues as they appear in science-fiction works.
    • Critically assess a philosophical position for its implications and its plausibility.
    • Formulate and defend a position of one’s own on these issues, with reference to the relevant positions described in the philosophical literature and the ideas displayed in science fiction works.
    • Display knowledge of the core concepts and methods of philosophy, and the ability to deploy those concepts and methods in reasoning.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 325 - Women and Philosophy


    Description:
    An examination of what the history of philosophy has claimed about the significance of gender with particular attention to the characterization of women in those texts and the impact of this history on contemporary thought. PHIL 325 and WGSS 351 are equivalent courses; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered on even numbered years. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine the dominant conceptions of gender in the history of philosophy
    • Identify how these conceptions play out in contemporary gender articulations
    • Examine contemporary feminist theory’s challenges to these ideas, and the range of perspectives used in those challenges
    • Critically evaluate these theoretical assumptions, identifying both their strengths and limitations

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/18/2018

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 345 - Chinese Philosophy


    Description:
    Selected philosophical topics in Chinese literature. May be repeated up to 10 credits. Formerly PHIL 445, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the major schools of the Chinese philosophical tradition.
    • Explain the differences and commonalities of the various philosophical traditions of China.
    • Verbally and expositorally articulate an understanding of the philosophical traditions of China and their influences on the wider social milieu.
    • Develop analytical, reading and writing skills.
    • Recognize and describe the full tradition of Chinese philosophy.
    • Recognize and identify the difficulties in defining Chinese philosophy and separating it from religious ideas and practices.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 347 - Philosophy of Law


    Description:
    Examines theories regarding the origin and justification of legal systems, including natural law theory, legal positivism, and legal realism. Topics may include civil disobedience, religious freedom, affirmative action, pornography, the insanity defense, and punishment.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the major theories regarding the philosophical basis of law, including natural law theory, legal positivism, and legal realism.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the nature of law and its connection to morality.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the major theoretical justifications for state-sponsored punishment, including retributivism and deterrence theories.
    • Identify the theoretical issues involved in specific debates surrounding personal privacy and government authority.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/17/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 348 - Social and Political Philosophy


    Description:
    An examination of the philosophical foundations of major modern social and political systems such as classical conservatism, liberalism, socialism, fascism, and anarchism.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of primary texts in social and political philosophy.
    • Recognize the key components of political theories and their connection to moral and political principles.
    • Evaluate political theories by appealing to moral theories, theories of human nature, and/ or historical events.
    • Compare and contrast political theories by considering both the principles supporting various theories and the content of those theories.
    • Diagnose problems in various political theories by appealing to the principles which support that theory.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/19/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 352 - Greek and Roman Philosophy


    Description:
    Overview of major thinkers and themes in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy. Figures/schools discussed may include the Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Stoicism, Epicureanism, Skepticism, Cicero, and/or Plotinus.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Read primary texts from the time period, and explain the author’s arguments and conclusions.
    • Compare the work of two authors and observe their points of agreement and disagreement.
    • Construct a reasoned criticism of an author’s argument.
    • Write a coherent and cohesive paper in which they engage respectfully but critically with the work of a primary author of the period.
    • Read primary texts from the time period, and explain the author’s arguments and conclusions.
    • Compare the work of two authors and observe their points of agreement and disagreement.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/8/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 353 - Early Modern Philosophy


    Description:
    A study of some of the influential philosophies of the 17th and 18th centuries: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume and Kant. Course will be offered every year (Winter).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Read primary texts from the time period, and explain the author’s arguments and conclusions.
    • Compare the work of two authors and observe their points of agreement and disagreement.
    • Construct a reasoned criticism of an author’s argument.
    • Write a coherent and cohesive paper in which they engage respectfully but critically with the work of a primary author of the period.
    • Read primary texts from the time period, and explain the author’s arguments and conclusions.
    • Compare the work of two authors and observe their points of agreement and disagreement.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/5/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 354 - Kant and Nineteenth-Century Philosophy


    Description:
    A study of European philosophers from the late 18th and 19th centuries. The course focuses on primary texts from such philosophers as Kant, Hegel, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Read primary texts from the time period, and explain the author’s arguments and conclusions.
    • Compare the work of two authors and observe their points of agreement and disagreement.
    • Construct a reasoned criticism of an author’s argument.
    • Write a coherent and cohesive paper in which they engage respectfully but critically with the work of a primary author of the period.

     
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/8/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
  •  

    PHIL 357 - Philosophy of Race


    Description:
    This course will examine the philosophical significance of race: interrogating its reality and legitimacy as a category of identify, and the political and social implications of racial identify, both historically and in contemporary contexts.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine the way in which social identity is formed and maintained, and its pervasive influence on our lives.
    • Analyze historical conceptions of race, and how these ideas and associated practices have influenced contemporary society.
    • Analyze philosophical positions on the reality and legitimacy of race, as a category of identity.
    • Critically reflect on their own positions on these issues and those of others, both in writing and in discussion.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 358 - Existentialism


    Description:
    Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Marcel, Heidegger, Jaspers, and Sartre.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts of existentialism.
    • Trace the historical development of existentialism in philosophical and literary texts, and compare differing positions within this movement.
    • Reflect critically on their own positions on these issues and those of others, both in thesis-based writing and in discussion.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/16/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 359 - Contemporary European Philosophy


    Description:
    A historical and critical study of contemporary European philosophy, with particular emphasis on phenomenology (including Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty) and how these ideas and methods have influenced recent European thought. Formerly PHIL 459, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the key concepts and methodology of phenomenology
    • Evaluate the arguments provided that support these concepts and claims
    • Articulate and justify original interpretations of these issues
    • Practice the process of brainstorming, drafting, and revising a thesis-based philosophy paper

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    PHIL 361 - Theory of Knowledge


    Description:
    A critical study of contemporary analytic epistemology. Topics may include belief, evidence, and perception; skepticism and justification; a priori knowledge; induction; knowledge of other minds; the ethics of belief; truth and relativism. Formerly PHIL 461, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine and critically analyze issues in contemporary epistemology.
    • Critically assess a philosophical position for its implications and its plausibility.
    • Formulate and defend a position or ‘one’s own on these issues, with reference to the relevant positions described in the philosophical literature.
    • Display knowledge of the core concepts and methods of analytic epistemology, and the ability to deploy those concepts and methods in reasoning.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/19/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 364 - Philosophy of Mind


    Description:
    A critical study of contemporary analytic philosophy of mind. Topics may include dualism, materialism, functionalism, consciousness, intentionality and representation, the computational theory of mind, artificial intelligence, and animal minds. Formerly PHIL 463, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine and critically analyze issues in contemporary philosophy of mind.
    • Critically assess a philosophical position for its implications and its plausibility.
    • Formulate and defend a position of one’s own on these issues, with reference to the relevant positions described in the philosophical literature.
    • Display knowledge of the core concepts and methods of analytic philosophy of mind, and the ability to deploy those concepts and methods in reasoning.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/19/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 377 - Literature and Philosophy


    Description:
    An examination of the intellectual, cultural, and historical convergences between philosophy and literature. PHIL 377 and ENG 377 are cross-listed courses; a student may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Contrast the philosophical and literary ideals of a cultural tradition with competing traditions or predecessors.
    • Define the elements of a philosophy of art or literature relevant to a literary tradition.
    • Apply a theoretical framework to representative literature from a historical period or movement, citing several relevant authors for comparison.
    • Identify the representative literary forms of a particular historical period or movement.
    • Survey a literary and philosophical movement with reference to philosophical texts and a variety of literary genres.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/18/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 378 - Philosophy of Love (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    A study of various concepts of love as they occur in philosophy, literature, and other cultural expressions. The nature of romantic love, eros, agape, friendship, and fellow feeling will be discussed. AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W). (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W).

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the various connotations of the word ‘love’ as expressed both diachronically and synchronically in various cultures as informed by various disciplines.
    • Delineate the various connotations of the concept of ‘love’ in the Classical World, while acknowledging that the multi-semantic potential of Greek ‘love’ both precedes and proceeds these Classical texts.
    • Describe the nature of love in Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, India and China and compare these non-Western conceptions of love to those in the Classical World.
    • Describe the nature of love in both western and eastern religious traditions, again making comparison to the nature of love in the Classical and Ancient Worlds.
    • Describe the manner in which the various connotations of ‘love’ can be found in the cycles of human life.
    • Describe how various films, works of art, music and autobiographical books depict the concept of love.
    • Report their philosophy of love to their classmates.
    • Demonstrate the skills of team work.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/26/2004

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 380 - Philosophy of Science


    Description:
    A critical study of the aims, structure, and methodology of the sciences. Topics covered may include explanation, prediction, induction, theories, scientific realism, empiricism, laws, and confirmation. Formerly PHIL 480, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine and critically analyze issues in contemporary philosophy of science, and recognize their relevance to current and/or historical instances of the scientific enterprise.
    • Critically assess a philosophical position for its implications and its plausibility, especially in relation to science as it is done by scientists.
    • Formulate and defend a position of one’s own on these issues, with reference to the relevant positions described in the philosophical literature.
    • Display knowledge of the core concepts and methods of analytic philosophy of science, and the ability to deploy those concepts and methods in reasoning.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/18/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 381 - Life Hacks for Transfer Student Success


    Description:
    This course provides transfer students with tips, tools and strategies for success at CWU. Students connect with faculty and peers to create an individualized plan for degree completion and professional success. (CAH/COM/ENG/HIST/PHIL/RELS/WLC 381) are cross-listed courses; a student may only receive credit for one.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify common transfer issues and propose strategies for success at CWU.
    • Generate connections with faculty and peers in the discipline.
    • Plan an efficient pathway to graduation.
    • Identify CWU and community resources available for different types of support.
    • Demonstrate knowledge and use of discipline specific practices using CWU academic resources.
    • Design an individualized plan for engagement in the discipline

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg, Online Winter Locations: Ellensburg, Online Spring Locations: Ellensburg, Online Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  •  

    PHIL 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 403 - Philosophy of Art


    Description:
    Survey of ancient, modern, and contemporary philosophy of art, with an emphasis on primary texts and application to artwork. Examination of different ways to define art and its function: art as representation, expression, and metaphor. Formerly PHIL 303, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the major philosophies of art: representational theory, institutional theory, formalism, naturalism, expressivism, and phenomenology.
    • Identify the ways in which an artist’s intention matters and does not matter in interpreting a work of art.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which metaphor in art helps us epistemically to understand the world and other people more clearly.
    • Demonstrate the relationship between art and philosophic vocabulary.
    • Identify the ways that philosophy has influenced art and art has developed its own philosophies, especially in the Dada movement; as well as how artists have challenged philosophies of art.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    PHIL 459 - Phenomenology


    Description:
    A historical and critical study of phenomenology as a philosophic method. Leading phenomenologists such as Husserl, Scheler, and Merleau-Ponty.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 465 - Advanced Ethics (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    Advanced topics reflecting current trends and problems within philosophical ethics. May be repeated up to a maximum of 10 credits. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Discuss and evaluate current research in philosophical ethics.
    • Explain the connections between general claims in ethical theory and specific issues in the field.
    • Analyze and evaluate the reasoning and justification for (as opposed to merely the content of) various positions in ethical theory.
    • Develop and defend criticisms of positions held in contemporary philosophical ethics.
    • Explain how abstract positions within philosophical ethics connect to particular issues in society and apply those abstract positions to particular issues.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/6/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 485 - Capstone Project


    Description:
    Culminating experience (research paper, internship or creative project) to synthesize and display understanding of knowledge gained in coursework as applied to academic, professional and personal plans for the future.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Synthesize the various approaches and ideas they have encountered in their previous coursework in the ethics minor.
    • Display an understanding of those various approaches and ideas.
    • Apply what they have learned to their academic, professional and personal plans for the future.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 488 - Junior Seminar


    Description:
    Intensive study of selected philosophical theories, movements, or figures. May be repeated up to 10 credits under a different subtitle.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: student must be a philosophy major with junior or senior standing or have permission from the instructor.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify major concepts and issues on selected topics.
    • Evaluate critically major concepts and theories covered in the course.
    • Approach selected issues from a pluralistic perspective.
    • Advance and support a thesis.
    • Read analytically and critically relevant primary texts.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/16/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  
    Learning Agreement Forms

    PHIL 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized, contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: prior approval required.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 494 - Undergraduate Thesis Preparation


    Description:
    Preparation for writing undergraduate thesis. Grade will be either S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: advanced standing (junior standing or above) and permission of instructor.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate progress towards understanding the major ideas within philosophical traditions, specifically those relevant to the self-designed thesis topic.
    • Demonstrate progress in the ability to advance and support a thesis, as well as analyze and critically evaluate the beliefs and arguments of others.
    • Demonstrate pluralistic and flexible thinking, considering new ideas and critically reflecting on them.
    • Respond productively to advisor suggestions on topic, thesis statement, sources, and organization of the senior thesis.
    • Evaluate the relevance and reliability of scholarly sources, specific to the topic of the senior thesis.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/18/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 495 - Undergraduate Thesis


    Description:
    Produce an original substantive thesis-driven paper based on independent research. By permission.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PHIL 494 and advanced standing.

    Credits: (3)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding the major ideas within philosophical traditions, specificity those relevant to the self-designed thesis topic.
    • Demonstrate the ability to advance and support an original thesis.
    • Analyze and critically evaluate the beliefs and arguments of others.
    • Demonstrate pluralistic and flexible thinking, considering new ideas and critically reflecting on them.
    • Respond productively to advisor’s suggestions for revision.
    • Evaluate the relevance and reliability of scholarly sources, specific to the topic of the senior thesis.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/16/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  
  •  

    PHIL 497 - Honors Thesis


    Description:
    Produce an original, thesis-driven honors level paper based on original research. Paper will be reviewed by a second departmental reader and presented in an open forum.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PHIL 494, advanced standing, and admission to the Philosophy and Religious Studies Departmental Honors Program.

    Credits: (3)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an advanced understanding of the major ideas within philosophical traditions, specifically those relevant to the self-designed thesis topic.
    • Demonstrate an advanced ability to develop and support an original thesis.
    • Analyze and critically evaluate the beliefs and arguments of others.
    • Demonstrate a high degree of pluralistic and flexible thinking, considering new ideas and critically reflecting on them.
    • Respond productively to advisor’s suggestions for revision.
    • Evaluate the relevance and reliability of scholarly sources, specific to the topic of the senior thesis.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/15/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PHIL 499 - Seminar


    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Physical Education (PE)

  
  •  

    PE 115 - Beginning Climbing


    Description:
    This course will introduce students to indoor rock climbing techniques. Including: climbing movement and top rope climbing skills. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the correct spotting technique.
    • Identify the types of climbing holds.
    • Demonstrate the ability to move effectively on a wall by performing the following: square to the wall, front step, back step, straight arms, scumming, gripping techniques, precise placement, quite placement, edging, smearing, toeing and matching.
    • Demonstrate the knowledge of how to practice and use resting and breathing techniques.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/16/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 116 - Intermediate Climbing


    Description:
    This course will build indoor rock climbing skills learned in PE 115, beginning climbing, and introduce skills that will help students begin climbing outside. Including climbing movement, lead climbing, rappelling and anchor cleaning. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PE 115 or instructor approval.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate correct lead belay and lead climbing technique.
    • Identify types of climbing including, bouldering, top roping, leading sport climbing, traditional climbing multipitch climbing and aid climbing.
    • Demonstrate the ability to move effectively on a wall by performing the following: gripping techniques, hip twist, precise foot placement, heel booking and toe booking.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the causes and prevention of the most common overuse injuries in climbing.
    • Demonstrate ability to properly clean climbing gear from fixed anchors.
    • Demonstrate correct rappelling technique.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/16/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 118 - Climbing Wall to Rock


    Description:
    Introduction to outdoor rock climbing by ensuring proficiency in an indoor setting over 5 weeks and to be concluded with an outdoor climbing trip to utilize skills learned. Course focuses on anchor systems, rappelling, lead climbing and belaying, and trip planning. Climbing experience and a top rope belay certification required.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PE 115 or PE 116 or by permission of instructor.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate correct lead belay and lead climbing technique
    • Identify types of equipment needed for outdoor rock climbing and the uses of each.
    • Demonstrate proficiency in belaying and climbing movement.
    • Identify the differences associated with indoor climbing and outdoor climbing.
    • Demonstrate ability to properly clean climbing gear from fixed anchors.
    • Demonstrate correct rappelling technique.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 220 - Climbing Wall Instructor (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    This course will prepare students to instruct climbing in an indoor setting. Students will learn to instruct both technical and movement climbing skills. This course will prepare students to receive a climbing wall instructor certification through the professional climbing instructors association. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate proficiency in belaying and climbing movement.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of teaching climbing skills.
    • Demonstrate ability to perform rescue skills, including belay take-over, counter ascend, and pick-off.
    • Demonstrate ability to instruct a technical climbing lesson.
    • Demonstrate ability to instruct a movement-based climbing lesson.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 298 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 321 - Football Coaching


    Credits: (3)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 323 - Basketball Coaching


    Credits: (3)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 325 - Baseball Coaching


    Credits: (3)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 326 - Theory of Coaching Soccer


    Description:
    This course provides an in-depth examination of the coaching of soccer at all school age levels. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify different systems of play.
    • Identify the difference between defensive philosophies.
    • Collect a variety of statistics during a soccer game.
    • Create practice plans.
    • Coaching and organization issues in youth soccer.
    • Describe the player positions used at various levels of play.
    • Identify specific concepts based on developmental age of players.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/21/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 330 - Volleyball Coach


    Credits: (3)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 334 - Physical Education Activities for the Elementary School


    Description:
    Selection, organization, and presentation of physical education activities in the elementary school.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: current WSP/FBI fingerprint clearance, and conditional or full admission to the Teacher Certification Program.

    Credits: (3)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 346 - Administration of Athletes


    Description:
    The course will provide the student with an overview of the role of the athletic director as the leader, manager, organizer, and director of the interscholastic and intercollegiate programs in public and private schools.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PE 365.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Express and maintain an individual philosophy of sport.
    • Identify and know leadership skills.
    • Recognize essentials and nuances of scheduling events, transportation, and meetings.
    • Recognize essentials and nuances of planning for and managing events.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/15/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 365 - Foundations of Coaching


    Description:
    Introduction to principles and methods of coaching sports with children and youth.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate and understanding the purpose and value of sport experiences for children and youth.
    • Recognize differences in coaching objectives and coaching styles.
    • Recognize differences in communication skills and their impact in athletic coaching environments.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of principles of motivation.
    • Demonstrate the ability to design a conditioning program for a selected sport.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of team management and risk management.
    • Qualify for certification from the American Sport Education Program (ASEP).

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/2/2006

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 442 - Field Work in Physical Education


    Description:
    Class to be arranged by college supervisor. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 448 - Coaching and Competitive Ethics


    Description:
    This course is to enable the student to understand and apply ethical values as a practitioner (coach) in the realm of competitive sport. Course will be offered every year (Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PE 365 OR declared sport management major.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Be able to identify and outline critical and ethical values that exist in coaching.
    • Be able to apply ethical decision-making in coaching situations, and justify those decisions.
    • Be able to articulate the purposes and functions of a “code of ethics,” and construct a code of ethics for an athletic team.
    • Be able to evaluate the relationship between ethics and competition.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 453 - Psychological and Sociological Foundations of Coaching


    Description:
    Investigation of factors affecting individual and group behavior in the coaching of interscholastic sports. Course will be offered every year (Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PE 365 OR declared sport management major.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Articulate factors affecting individual and group behavior in the coaching of interscholastic sport, and devise strategies for addressing those behaviors.
    • Identify basic ideas and beliefs that constitute dominant ideologies related to sports in American society (gender and sexuality, race/ethnicity/skin color, social class, etc.), and explain their influence on interscholastic sport.
    • Articulate the different psycho-social issues involving interscholastic sport athletes, and devise strategies for addressing those issues.
    • Demonstrate the ability diagnose, and propose solutions to, the issues pertaining to recruiting and retaining student participation in sport.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 491 - Workshop Clinic


    Description:
    Letter grades or S or U grades may be given at the option of the Department of Physical Education. May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 492 - Practicum


    Description:
    Practical experience working with children in physical education activities. May be repeated for credit. Four credits required in major.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: four credits in physical education major.

    Credits: (1-4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Successfully complete 30 hours working in a supervised practicum placement.
    • Demonstrate effective use of managerial and instructional routines to foster active, positive, and equitable learning experiences in the practicum.
    • Plan instructional objectives and goals that are aligned to State Essential Academic Learning Requirements and NASPE National Standards in a lesson plan.
    • Reflect about their teaching and observations in the authentic setting by writing in their daily journal and overall teaching paper.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/3/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PE 495 - Field Work in Sport Coaching


    Description:
    This course will provide the student with the opportunity to gain practical experience with current professionals in the field of sport coaching. By permission of instructor. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, and Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PE 365 and PE 448; students must also complete CPR certification and a background check prior to registering for PE 495.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate and understand the rules associated with a specific sport.
    • Demonstrate the ability to construct and implement quality sport specific practice plans.
    • Demonstrate positive communication skills and techniques towards successfully motivating and coaching athletes.
    • Demonstrate the ability to effectively teach sport specific skills and techniques.
    • Demonstrate skills related to team operational management, risk management, and time management responsibilities.
    • Create a network with professionals in the sport coaching field, thereby increasing job prospects and career advancement possibilities.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
 

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