Feb 01, 2023  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Courses numbered from 101–299 are lower-division courses, primarily for freshmen and sophomores; those numbered from 300–499 are upper-division courses, primarily for juniors and seniors. The numbers 296, 396, 496, and 596 designate individual study courses and are available for registration by prior arrangement with the course instructor and approval of the department chair.

The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the amount of credit each course carries. Variable credit courses include the minimum and maximum number of the credits within parentheses.

Not all of the courses are offered every quarter. Final confirmation of courses to be offered, information on new courses and programs, as well as a list of hours, instructor, titles of courses and places of class meetings, is available online in My CWU which can be accessed through the the CWU home page, and go to www.cwu.edu/registrar/course-information

 

Mechanical Engineering Technology (MET)

  
  •  

    MET 351LAB - Metallurgy/Materials and Processes Laboratory


    Description:
    Ferrous and nonferrous metals and alloys; polymeric, ceramic, and cellular materials; use of phase diagrams, cooling curves, stress-strain diagrams, and metallography. This course consists of two hours of lab each week plus an associated lecture for four hours per week. Co-requisite: MET 351.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: CHEM 111 or CHEM 181.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply appropriate material best practices used in a work environment.
    • Select appropriate materials for a product.
    • Communicate rationale for their decision on design and selection of materials in a lab setting.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    MET 355 - CAD/CAM Manufacturing


    Description:
    Introduction to the mechanical design and manufacturing process. Machining of metallic and non-metallic materials on automated equipment; programming and operation of Computer Numeric Controlled (CNC) equipment. Integrates Computer-aided Design (CAD) and Computer-aided Manufacturing (CAM).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ETSC 265 and MET 255.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Design a part to be produced applying Geometric Dimensioning & Tolerencing (GD&T) and solid modeling principles using Computer Aided Manufacturing (both additive and subtractive processes) to produce a part.
    • Create, modify, and translate Computer Numeric Control (CNC) program code using Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) and manual means.
    • Simulate, optimize, and fabricate folded metal parts.
    • Describe Lean concepts that can be applied to manufacturing processes. 
    • Create programs using Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) and Computer Aided Manufacturing (CAM) software to create a part.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    MET 357 - Welding/Fabrication


    Description:
    Theory and practice in arc welding, oxyacetylene welding and cutting, MIG, TIG, and plastic welding. Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.

    Credits: (4)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    MET 387 - Engineering Ethics


    Description:
    This course applies critical thinking to effective workplace and professional performance within mechanical engineering, with ethics as a primary aspect in developing students to be successful engineers. There are two hours of lecture per week. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Pre-requisite: MET 314.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Classify and identify ethical issues in an engineering context
    • Characterize ethical terms, cases and analyses
    • Apply ethics analyses to engineering scenarios mitigate related issues
    • Modify personal behavior and work place environment to comply with ethics

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    MET 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    MET 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    MET 398 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    MET 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    MET 411 - Energy Systems I


    Description:
    Power generation, energy reserves, fuels, reciprocating machines, internal combustion engines, rotating compressors, axial flow turbines, and gas turbine power. Four hours lecture per week.

    Prerequisites:
    Co-requisite: MET 411LAB. Prerequisite: MET 316.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Develop an understanding of the practical aspects of thermodynamics by relating theory to various applications of energy conversions systems.
    • Learn the fundamentals of various state-of-the art energy conversion systems such as steam power plants, spark ignition engines, compression ignition engines, gas turbines, and rocket engines.
    • Demonstrate an engineering understanding of refrigeration and air conditioning systems.
    • Learn terminology in the energy conversion technical field so that they may read, discuss and comprehend the relevant literature.
    • Demonstrate the capability of predicting and measuring the performance of energy conversion systems.
    • Demonstrate the ability to plan and conduct energy conversion experiments.
    • Perform computerized data analysis and be able to present and explain experimental results with clarity.
    • Demonstrate the ability to select proper instrumentation to support experiments and have the ability to calibrate various sensors and connect sensors to data acquisition systems.
    • Become a better informed citizen who can take a leadership position when discussions arise dealing with energy issues.
    • Demonstrate the ability to write various types of test reports common in the engineering field.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/9/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    MET 411LAB - Energy Systems I Laboratory


    Description:
    Practical application of energy system principles. Lab work includes power generation, energy reserves, fuels, reciprocating machines, internal combustion engines, rotating compressors, axial flow turbines, and gas turbine power. Two hours laboratory per week.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MET 316LAB.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Develop an understanding of the practical aspects of thermodynamics by relating theory to various applications of energy conversions systems.
    • Learn the fundamentals of various state-of-the art energy conversion systems such as steam power plants, spark ignition engines, compression ignition engines, gas turbines, and rocket engines.
    • Demonstrate an engineering understanding of refrigeration and air conditioning systems.
    • Learn terminology in the energy conversion technical field so that they may read, discuss and comprehend the relevant literature.
    • Demonstrate the capability of predicting and measuring the performance of energy conversion systems.
    • Demonstrate the ability to plan and conduct energy conversion experiments.
    • Perform computerized data analysis and be able to present and explain experimental results with clarity.
    • Demonstrate the ability to select proper instrumentation to support experiments and have the ability to calibrate various sensors and connect sensors to data acquisition systems.
    • Become a better informed citizen who can take a leadership position when discussions arise dealing with energy issues.
    • Demonstrate the ability to write various types of test reports common in the engineering field.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/9/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    MET 418 - Mechanical Design I


    Description:
    Mechanical design principles including material and device responses to complex loading and optimization of energy system and mechanical drives. This course consists of four hours of lecture each week plus an associated lab for two hours per week.

    Prerequisites:

    Prerequisites: ETSC 265 and (ETSC 312 with a grade of C+ or higher) and MET 255 and MET 327 and MET 327LAB. Co-requisites: MET 426 and MET 426LAB and MET 418LAB.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Have the ability to function effectively as a member of a technical team.
    • function effectively as team leader on a technical team
    • Have the ability to design systems, components, or processes for broadly-defined engineering technology problems appropriate to program educational objectives. (Standard machine components such as gears, belts, and chain drive, etc.)
    • Have the ability to identify, analyze, and solve broadly-defined engineering technology problems. (Proceed from a design concept to a complete design including analysis, part drawings, and material specification.)
    • Have a commitment to quality, timeliness, and continuous improvement. (Apply technical methodology in optimizing a complete design in terms of weight, cost estimates, as well as ‘buy’ decisions - ROI.)

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/9/2020

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg

  
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    MET 418LAB - Mechanical Design I Laboratory


    Description:
    Practical application of mechanical design principles. Lab work includes design and or evaluation of modern mechanical devices, concepts and systems. This course consists of two hours of lab each week plus an associated lecture for four hours per week.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ETSC 265 and ETSC 312 with a grade of C+ or higher.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Function effectively as a member or leader on a technical team
    • Proceed from a design concept to a complete design including analysis, part drawings, and material specification in a lab setting
    • Apply technical methodology in analyzing a complete design in terms of weight and cost estimates, as well as ‘buy’ decision in a lab setting

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/9/2020

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    MET 419 - Mechanical Design II


    Description:
    Fasteners, welds, machine frames, pressure vessels, hydraulic cylinders, electrical motors, and actuators. This course consists of four hours of lecture each week plus an associated lab for two hours per week.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MET 418 and MET 418LAB. Co-Requisite: MET 419LAB.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Proceed from a design concept to a complete design including analysis, part drawings, and material specification in a lab setting.
    • Demonstrate the ability to complete shaft analysis.
    • Apply technical methodology in analyzing a complete design in terms of weight and cost estimates, as well as ‘buy’ decisions in a lab setting.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    MET 419LAB - Mechanical Design II Laboratory


    Description:
    Practical application of mechanical design principles. Lab work includes mechanical design principles for optimization of energy conversion systems via machine and power elements.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MET 418 and MET 418LAB.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Proceed from a design concept to a complete design including analysis, part drawings, and material specification in a lab setting
    • Student will be able to function effectively as a member a technical team.
    • Apply technical methodology in analyzing a complete design in terms of weight and cost estimates, as well as ‘buy’ decisions in a lab setting.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    MET 420 - Finite Element Analysis


    Description:
    Computerized modeling of structural and thermal design problems. This course consists of two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week. Course will be offered every year (Winter).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: ETSC 265 and MET 426.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate and calculate the analytical method of finite element analysis (FEA)
    • Evaluate appropriate use of numerical analysis techniques for a given engineering problems
    • Assess the results of FEA
    • Defend use of good engineering judgment in the design of FEA models
    • Apply computer based systems to develop and analyze problems
    • Document and verbally articulate model usage and results

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    MET 423 - Computer-aided Design and Manufacturing


    Description:
    Integrates Computer-aided Design (CAD) and Computer-aided Manufacturing (CAM). Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: ETSC 265 and MET 355.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe CAD/CAM.
    • List the stages of part design and manufacturing.
    • Describe the documentation resulting from the CAD process.
    • Identify the types of three dimensional modeling schemes and appropriately select the type for designing a part.
    • Describe CAD design and engineering analysis activities.
    • Produce a solid model drawing and transfer geometry to another software.
    • Produce a CNC machined part from a solid model drawing.
    • Translate geometry into programming code suitable for machining.
    • Describe manual part programming methods.
    • Describe the CAD/CAM part programming process. Describe post processing.
    • Select and electronically transfer any of four me types appropriate for software interaction.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/9/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    MET 426 - Applications of Mechanics of Materials


    Description:
    Topics support stress analysis and design. Laboratory activities include material strength, hardness, impact testing, strain gage technology, photoelasticity, ultrasonics, and eddy current. This course consists of four hours of lecture each week plus an associated lab for two hours per week.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (ETSC 312 with a grade of C+ or higher) and MET 351. Co-requisites: MET 426LAB.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply ‘compliant’ engineering methodology.
    • Apply energy stress analysis methods.
    • Apply non-destructive evaluation techniques.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/9/2020

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    MET 426LAB - Applications of Mechanics of Materials Laboratory


    Description:
    Topics support stress analysis and design. Laboratory activities include material strength, hardness, impact testing, strain gage technology, photoelasticity, ultrasonics, and eddy current. This course consists of two hours of lab each week plus an associated lecture for four hours per week.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (ETSC 312 with a grade of C+ or higher) and MET 351.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Conduct material testing in compliance with standards
    • Apply nondestructive techniques to determine structural integrity
    • Critique material testing procedures for specific applications

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/9/2020

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    MET 482 - Plastics and Composites


    Description:
    Composition, characteristics, and classifications of plastics and composite materials incorporating industrial applications, processing, and fabrication. Design, prediction, and testing of plastic and composite structures. Formerly MET 382, students may not receive credit for both.This course consists of four hours of lecture plus an associated lab for 2 hours a week.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (CHEM 111 and CHEM 111LAB), or (CHEM 181 and CHEM 181LAB). Co-requisites: MET 482LAB.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Classify and identify polymers and composites in engineering context.
    • Characterize polymer constituents and describe their life cycle.
    • Design and process polymers and composites to obtain predicted properties.
    • Fabricate basic polymer/composite parts.
    • Select and improve polymer/composite processes for increased manufacturing efficiency.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    MET 482LAB - Plastics and Composites Laboratory


    Description:
    Practical application of design analysis, manufacturing, and evaluation of plastics and composites. Lab work includes the design, fabrication, and evaluation of a composite structure. This course consists of two hours of lab each week plus an associated lecture for four hours per week.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (CHEM 111 and CHEM 111LAB), or (CHEM 181 and CHEM 181LAB).

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply subject content to both predict behavior and compare with experimental results.
    • Design test systems to quantitatively demonstrate subject matter concepts.
    • Collect experimental data to quantitatively demonstrate subject matter concepts.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MET 483 - Ceramics and Composites


    Description:
    Composition, characterization, and classification of ceramics and related composite materials incorporating industrial applications, processing, and fabrication. Design, prediction, and testing of ceramic and composite structures. This course consists of four hours of lecture plus an associated two hour lab per week.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (CHEM 111 and CHEM 111LAB), or (CHEM 181 and CHEM 181LAB). Co-requisites: MET 483LAB.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Classify and identify ceramics & composites in an engineering context
    • Characterize ceramic composition, structure and properties
    • Design and process ceramics and composites to obtain predicted properties
    • Fabricate basic ceramic/composite parts
    • Select and improve ceramic/composite processes for increased manufacturing efficiency

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MET 483LAB - Ceramics and Composites Laboratory


    Description:
    Practical application of design analysis, manufacturing, and evaluation of ceramics and composites. Lab work includes the design, fabrication, and evaluation of a composite structure. This course consists of two hours of lab each week plus an associated lecture for four hours per week.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (CHEM 111 and CHEM 111LAB), or (CHEM 181 and CHEM 181LAB).

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply subject content to both predict behavior and compare with experimental results.
    • Design test systems to quantitatively demonstrate subject matter concepts.
    • Collect experimental data to quantitatively demonstrate subject matter concepts.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MET 488 - Professional Certification Exam Preparation


    Description:
    A comprehensive review of professional mechanical engineering principles and technical skills in preparation for the national certification examination. Two hours of lecture per week.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MET 387 and MET 418.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate their ability to perform basic calculations found in mechanical engineering
    • Demonstrate their basic knowledge of principles on the FE exam, in such areas as statics, mechanics of materials, materials science, thermodynamics, fluids, etc.
    • Develop and test their skills, education, and knowledge of the general mechanical engineering practice as a certified Engineer in Training

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MET 489A - Senior Project I


    Description:
    This capstone course includes planning, design, and analysis (A), construction (B), and test and evaluation (C). The students select an engineering problem and design a solution. Two lecture hours and four practice hours per week. Formerly MET 495A, students may not receive credit for both. Notes: MET 489A,B,C must be taken in sequence. Failure to complete any course in this sequence, requires restarting the sequence at 489A.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: ETSC 265 and MET 255 and MET 314 and MET 314LAB and MET 327 and MET 327LAB and MET 351 and MET 351LAB and MET 387. Co-requisites: MET 418 and MET 418LAB and MET 426 and MET 426LAB.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the ability to apply mechanical engineering skills through optimized design, construction, and evaluation of their project.
    • Demonstrate an ability to select and apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require the application of principles and applied procedures or methodologies.
    • Demonstrate an ability to design systems, components, or processes for broadly-defined engineering technology problems appropriate to program educational objectives.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of and a commitment to address professional and ethical responsibilities including a respect for diversity.
    • Demonstrate a knowledge of the impact of engineering technology solutions in a societal and global context.
    • Apply organizational skills to promote progress.
    • Communicate their progress and achievements through meetings, reports, and presentations.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MET 489B - Senior Project II


    Description:
    This capstone course includes planning, design, and analysis (A), construction (B), and test and evaluation (C). The students select an engineering problem and design a solution. Two hours of lecture and four hours of practice. Formerly MET 495B; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Winter).

    Notes: Course must be taken in sequence. Failure to complete any course in this sequence, requires restarting the sequence at 489A.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MET 489A.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • apply mechanical engineering skills through optimized design, construction, and evaluation of their project. ABET SO 3a.
    • demonstrate an ability to select and apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require the application of principles and applied procedures or methodologies. ABET SO 3b.
    • demonstrate an ability to design systems, components, or processes for broadly-defined engineering technology problems appropriate to program educational objectives. ABET SO 3d.
    • demonstrate an understanding of and a commitment to address professional and ethical responsibilities including a respect for diversity. ABET SO 3i.
    • demonstrate a knowledge of the impact of engineering technology solutions in a societal and global context. ABET SO 3j.
    • apply organizational skills to promote progress. ABET SO 3k.
    • communicate their progress and achievements through meetings, reports, and presentations. ABET SO Mh.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/7/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
  •  

    MET 489C - Senior Project III


    Description:
     

    This capstone course includes planning, design, and analysis (A), construction (B), and test and evaluation (C). The students select an engineering problem and design a solution. Two hours of lecture and four hours of practice. Formerly MET 495C; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Spring).

    Notes: Course must be taken in sequence. Failure to complete any course in this sequence, requires restarting the sequence at 489A.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MET 489B.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the ability to apply mechanical engineering skills through optimized design, construction, and evaluation of their project. ABET SO 3a.
    • Demonstrate an ability to select and apply a knowledge of mathematics, science, engineering, and technology to engineering technology problems that require the application of principles and applied procedures or methodologies. ABET SO 3b.
    • Demonstrate an ability to design systems, components, or processes for broadly-defined engineering technology problems appropriate to program educational objectives. ABET SO 3d.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of and a commitment to address professional and ethical responsibilities including a respect for diversity. ABET SO 3i.
    • Demonstrate a knowledge of the impact of engineering technology solutions in a societal and global context. ABET SO 3j.
    • Apply organizational skills to promote progress. ABET SO 3k.
    • Communicate their progress and achievements through meetings, reports, and presentations. ABET SO Mh.

     
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/7/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
  •  

    MET 496 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MET 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MET 498 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MET 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Military Science and Leadership (MSL)

  
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    MSL 101 - Foundations of Officership


    Description:
    Introduces students to knowledge, skills, and behaviors that are central to a commissioned officer’s responsibilities; leadership, Army values, physical fitness and time management. Open to all students.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Dissect problems in a way that allows for the identification of the unique leadership challenges. Then identify how some problems can become compounded by time constraints.
    • Recognize knowledge, skills, and behaviors central to officership, leadership, and Army values.
    • Know and describe key aspects of the US Army, to include the Army National Guard (ARNG) and US Army Reserve (USAR), as it relates to accomplishing the duties of a commissioned officer (Officership).
    • Explain the role of the US Army in war and peace and the role of commissioned officers in the organization.
    • Discuss current world affairs and their impact on military planning and legislation.
    • Compare the roles of Officers and Non-Commissioned Officers when executing their duties.
    • Explain Army customs, courtesies, and traditions and how to apply those (Values & Ethics).
    • Recognize the role of time management and how it relates to long range, intermediate, and immediate goals.
    • Describe the four key fundamentals of basic rifle marksmanship
    • Identify leadership theory and principles.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    6/3/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 101LAB - Basic Field Craft Laboratory


    Description:
    Students will practice basic soldier skills, including but not limited to individual and buddy team movement techniques, field craft, basic rifle marksmanship, tactics, and land navigation.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Learn to properly set up gear and integrate the gear into field exercises.
    • Learn individual movement techniques (IMT), and how to integrate IMTs into Fire Team movements.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 102 - Basic Leadership


    Description:
    Establishes foundation of basic fundamentals such as problem solving, communications, briefings, effective writing, goal setting, techniques for improving listening and speaking skills, and an introduction to counseling. Open to all students.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define leadership.
    • Describe and understand the four factors of leadership.
    • Describe and understand the eleven principles of leadership.
    • Describe the BE-KNOW-DO framework of current Army leadership doctrine.
    • Describe and understand the nine competencies of leadership.
    • Explain how the professional Army ethic evolves from basic national values.
    • Describe the four fundamental values of the Army ethic.
    • Relate individual values to the professional Army ethic.
    • Relate how the Oath of Office and the Officer’s Commission statement reflect national values, the professional Army ethic and individual values.
    • Describe the nature of groups and explain why people join them.
    • Explain the stages of team development and the leader’s responsibilities in each.
    • Describe the process by which an individual soldier becomes a member of a team.
    • Determine the stages of development of a soldier team and develop a plan to enhance team development.
    • Describe the communications process.
    • Describe the communications barriers affecting the sending and receiving of messages and explain how to overcome these barriers.
    • List and describe the characteristics of good listening and explain active listening.
    • Identify the leader’s responsibilities for soldier development through counseling.
    • Describe the counseling process to include the different counseling approaches, the communications process, and the problem solving process.
    • Describe the types of counseling and their relationship to soldier development.
    • Apply the types of counseling.
    • Explain how the values and obligations of the Code of conduct apply to military personnel as a set of professional ethics in a captive situation.
    • Explain how Articles I thru VI of the Code of Conduct apply to military personnel.
    • List and describe the five paragraphs of an Operations order.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 102LAB - Military Formations and Order of Movement


    Description:
    Students will learn the basics of military patrolling. Students will improve individual movement techniques and fieldcraft skills.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Learn and begin to master individual movement techniques.
    • Learn the doctrinal setup of Fire Teams, Squads and Platoons with regards to patrolling.
    • Continue to learn new ways to setup their equipment and to integrate more types of weapons systems.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 103 - Advanced Leadership


    Description:
    Studies in problem solving, communications, effective writing, goal setting, techniques of listening, advanced speaking skills and professional counseling. Open to all students.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define and understand the definition of leadership.
    • List and discuss the 11 Leadership Principles.
    • Describe the 4 Factors of Leadership.
    • Identify and understand the features and the marginal information on the map sheet.
    • Identify the major terrain features (hill, valley, ridge, saddle and depression) and the minor terrain features (draw, spur and cliff).
    • Determine eight-digit grid coordinates and plot locations using various techniques.
    • Measure and determine distance on a map.
    • Determine and convert azimuths in MILS and degrees.
    • Determine the location of unknown points.
    • Properly utilize a lensatic compass.
    • Identify contour lines and intervals on a map.
    • Determine the slope of a hill utilizing a map.
    • Convert distance in miles and kilometers.
    • Evaluate the casualty following the sequence of steps in the performance measures. Check for: Responsiveness, Breathing, Bleeding, Shock, Fractures, Burns, Head Injury, Seek Medical Aid, and Identify all injuries and conditions.
    • Describe and understand prevention of cold weather injuries.
    • Describe and understand the key fundamentals of basic rifle marksmanship.
    • Operate and maintain an M16A1/M16A2.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 103LAB - Warrior Tasks and Skills


    Description:
    Students learn the role of a Fire Team within platoon patrols, practice incorporating the Troop Leading Procedures at the Fire Team level, and practice tactics and movement techniques in preparation for Spring field training exercise.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Learn the role of Fire Teams in basic Army patrols.
    • Learn Troop Leading Procedures as they impact the Fire Team Level.
    • Build a base of understanding on how battle drills are conducted at the Fire Team Level.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 118 - Military Conditioning


    Description:
    Trains students on Army physical fitness techniques, provides conditioning workouts, and prepares students to pass the Army Physical Fitness Test. This class also provides students opportunities to build cohesive teams and organize and lead training. May be repeated for 2 credits.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize the level of physical readiness in which Army Officers need to be successful.
    • Learn how the Army carries out physical training.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    6/3/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 119 - Military Conditioning II


    Description:
     Trains students on Army physical fitness techniques, provides conditioning workouts, and prepares students to pass the Army Physical Fitness Test. This class also provides students opportunities to build cohesive teams and organize and lead training. May be repeated for 3 credits.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Learn how the Army performs physical training as a unit.
    • Recognize the level of physical readiness required of Army Officers.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    6/3/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 120 - Military Conditioning III


    Description:
    Trains students on Army physical fitness techniques, provides conditioning workouts, and prepares students to pass the Army Physical Fitness Test. This class also provides students opportunities to build cohesive teams and organize and lead training.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Learn how the Army performs physical training as a collective unit.
    • Recognize the level of physical readiness required of Army Officers.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    6/3/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 201 - Individual Leadership Studies


    Description:
    Students identify successful leadership characteristics through personal experience and observation of others during hands-on team building exercises. Explores persuasion techniques and the continuum of guidance to determine leadership styles. Open to all students.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Camouflage all exposed skin areas and individual equipment to avoid detection.
    • Camouflage defensive position so that it cannot be detected from a distance of 35 meters or from the air.
    • Analyze the route or location in terms of the five military aspects of terrain and determine how each affects the mission.
    • Identify cold weather injuries such as: Chilblain/frostnip, Frostbite, Trench foot, Snow blindness, Hypothermia, Dehydration.
    • Give first aid for cold weather without causing further injury to the casualty.
    • Develop and implement a personal physical fitness program that is in agreement with FM 21-20 and meets the goals prescribed in the Army’s fitness doctrine AR 350-15.
    • Introduce, explain, and lead a PT session IAW FM 21-20.
    • Explain the concepts, techniques, and procedures involved in implementing a PT program IAW FM 21-20.
    • Assemble and disassemble an M16A2 rifle and perform a functions check within 5 minutes.
    • Clean, inspect, and lubricate the rifle so that it functions correctly.
    • Thoroughly understand the mechanical operations, functions, maintenance, and safety of the M16 rifle, magazines and ammunition.
    • Operate an M16A2 rifle, safely.
    • Properly load chamber and fire the rifle, and unload the rifle so that no ammunition remains in the rifle and the rifle is in a safe condition.
    • Perform marksmanship fundamentals of steady position, aim, breathing, trigger squeeze.
    • Explain or assume basic firing positions: supported, prone, kneeling supported, kneeling unsupported, standing.
    • Coach other firers on correct procedures for zeroing the M16A2.
    • Place weapon on mechanical zero.
    • Correct individual weapon zero using shot group analysis.
    • Install the Claymore.
    • Perform circuit test and installation of firing wire and blasting cap.
    • Disarm and recover the Claymore using the correct procedures.
    • Properly inspect and correctly identify hand grenades ensuring the hand grenade is safe to use.
    • Select the correct hand grenade to do each of the following: disable or neutralize personnel, signal personnel, screen (provide concealment), destroy equipment and start fires, control riots or disable Individuals without causing serious injury.
    • Properly throw the selected hand grenade to achieve the intended outcome.
    • Correctly mount the M60 machine gun on the M122 tripod.
    • Load the machine gun such that when the safety is put on F (FIRE) and the trigger pulled, the machine gun will fire.
    • Apply immediate action that results in correction of a stoppage and resumption of firing.
    • Unload the machine gun such that it is cleared and rendered safe.
    • Operate the following: M60 Machine Gun Platform and Pintle Group, M60 Machine Gun Pintle Assembly, M60 Machine Gun Mounting Plate, The Safety in the Fire Position, The Cocking in the Forward Position, The Feed Tray, Receiver Group, And Chamber, and Ammunition Correctly Loaded in the Feed Tray.
    • Engage targets with an m60 machine gun.
    • Fire the M60 machine gun, using direct lay, in such a manner that the targets will be hit.
    • Understand Sight Alignment, Sight Picture, Adjusted Aiming Point, Center of Mass, Point Target Engagement, Moving Target Engagement, Trajectory and Maximum Ordinate, Cone of Fire, Relative Size and Shape of Beaten Zone, Danger Space, Classes of Fire with Respect to the Ground, Classes of Fire with Respect to the Target, and Traversing and Searching.
    • Enter the net, transmit and receive a message, and leave the net, without error, using correct phonetic alphabet and Numerals, prowords, and radio procedures.
    • Following established safety procedures inspect the antenna and radio IAW TM 11-5820-667-12 to ensure that it is operational, noting all deficiencies.
    • Using the proper frequency establish contact with another radio.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/7/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 201LAB - Squad Orientation


    Description:
    Basic introduction to Team Leader roles and responsibilities. Students will  practice and master the employment of U.S. Army weapon systems. Students will also practice team formations and order of movement.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand the team leader roles outlined in U.A. Army Training Circular 3-21.76.
    • Begin to understand the capabilities of U.S. Army weapon systems and proper emplacement. 
    • Maneuver a fire team while patrolling and under simulated enemy fire. Students will maintain control of team while halted and understand the team leader’s responsibilities of caring for subordinates.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 202 - Leadership and Teamwork


    Description:
    Examines how to build successful teams, various methods for influencing action, effective communication in setting and achieving goals, the importance of timing the decision, creativity in the problem solving process, and obtaining team buy-in through immediate feedback. Open to all students.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Conduct all commands, individual movements, formations, marching and conducting of drill, and ceremonies will be in accordance with FM 22-5.
    • Transmit information to the receiving authority in size, activity, location, unit, time, and equipment (S-A-L-U-T-E) format via radio, wire, cable, or written message with a messenger within 5 minutes after observation with six out of six S-A-L-U-T-E items correctly identified.
    • Maintain security during halts and movement.
    • Keep at least one element prepared to maneuver or to provide suppressive fire.
    • Continuously control movement.
    • Select the movement technique based on the likelihood of contact.
    • Move to within 100 meters of the enemy position without being exposed for over 5 seconds.
    • Understand individual movement routes including high crawl, low crawl, and rush.
    • React to a ground flare so that you do not draw accurate fire onto your position.
    • React to overhead flare with warning, without warning, when not under direct enemy fire, and when under direct enemy fire so that you do not draw accurate fire onto your position.
    • React to each situation by following leader’s action or perform appropriate actions.
    • Have a plan that must be developed using the key word SURVIVAL to avoid capture, maintain health, and return to friendly lines.
    • Know and understand the Army supply system as it relates to accomplishing your duties as a commissioned officer.
    • Specify the classes of supply within the Army.
    • Contrast wholesale with retail supply within the Army.
    • Specify the main actions involved in Army supply.
    • Specify documents which the loss, damage or destruction of government property must generate.
    • Specify the purpose of the Unit Supply Update.
    • Specify the two supply documents with which the cadet/candidate works and the purpose of each.
    • Specify the names of automated supply systems and a purpose of each.
    • Identify factors which influence accidents in both training and garrison environments.
    • Establish prevention plan.
    • Prepare risk assessment matrix.
    • Comply and enforce compliance with Army’s EO and sexual harassment policies, and take appropriate and expedient action to correct the problem or situation.
    • Define racism, sexism, and prejudice.
    • Define leader roles and responsibilities in the prevention of sexual harassment.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/7/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 202LAB - Squad Command and Control


    Description:
    Students will improve on their command and control while in the Team Leader position. Students will understand how the team affects the squad. Students will begin to transition to lead as a squad leader.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Give clear and concise commands to their subordinates to ensure the mission and end state is met. 
    • Command in their teams to conduct battle drills effectively and without hesitation. 
    • Begin to familiarize themselves with army communications and reporting procedures.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 203 - Army Doctrine and Decision Making


    Description:
    Principles of Army Doctrine and Decision Making as it relates to Army leaders. Formerly MSL 211, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Learn about the Law and Policies that govern land warfare for the U.S. Army.
    • Evaluate and apply counseling and coaching methods
    • Recognize the indicators of potential insider threats. Students will also be able to determine the appropriate response and reporting channels.
    • Evaluate mitigating factors for cases of natural and man-made disasters.
    • Identify and Define the elements of Leadership Definition in accordance with Army Doctrine Publication 6-22, Army Leadership and the Profession.
    • List and discriminate core leader attributes and competencies

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 203LAB - Orders and Planning


    Description:
    Covers the basics of mission orders; operations orders (OPORD), fragmentary orders (FRAGORD), and warning orders (WARNORD) as they affect the squad level. Introduces students to troop leading procedures as executed at the squad level.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Learn how to operate and maneuver at the squad level.
    • Exercise troop leading procedures at the squad level.
    • Understand different military orders and when they are used. Students will also begin to understand the U.S. Army’s planning process.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 212 - Leadership Laboratory


    Description:
    Practical experience in leadership and basic military skills. May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply leadership principles and basic military skills learned in both the basic and advanced course.
    • Demonstrate the ability to treat for shock, cold/hot weather injuries, fractures and burns, perform mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, transport and evaluate a casualty.
    • Use a compass, and utilize a grid reference map and protractor to locate points in the wilderness.
    • Compose and issue an oral operations order, develop sub­teams to perform tasks, conduct an after action review/evaluation.
    • Conduct and apply movement techniques for a squad. They will apply the principles of war, terrain analysis; mission planning, battle drills and reporting.
    • Respond to situational exercises using the proper leadership techniques and principles.
    • Identify battle drill application; integrate leadership, land navigation, first aid, and communication skills.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 292 - Leader’s Training Course, Internship


    Description:
    Basic military skills and leadership techniques taught at Ft. Knox, Kentucky, during the summer. Qualifies the student for enrollment in the ROTC advanced course. Training emphasizes leadership development and can be taken in place of the basic  course. Students receive pay, food, lodging, and travel expenses to and from Ft. Knox. By permission.

    Credits: (8)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Evaluate a Casualty
    • Perform 1st Aid to Prevent/control Shock
    • Perform 1st Aid for Bleeding of an Extremity
    • Perform 1st Aid for suspected Fracture
    • Perform 1st Aid for Burns
    • Perform Mouth-to-Mouth Resuscitation
    • Perform 1st Aid for an Open Head Wound
    • Perform 1st Aid for an Open Chest Wound
    • Perform 1st Aid for an Open Abdominal Wound
    • Perform 1st Aid to Clear Object from Throat
    • Perform 1st Aid for Cold Injuries
    • Perform 1st Aid for Heat Injuries
    • Transport a Casualty
    • Request Medical Evacuation
    • Perform 1st Aid for Nerve Agent Injury
    • Decontaminate yourself and individual Equipment Using Chemical Decontamination Kits
    • Protect Yourself from NBC Injury/Contamination with the Appropriate MOPP Gear
    • React to a Nuclear Hazard or Attack
    • Protect yourself using Protective Mask
    • Detect Chemical Agents Using MB or M9 Detector Paper
    • Identify Chemical Agents using M256 Chemical Agent Detector Kits
    • Conduct Unmasking Procedures
    • Recommend Admin and Personnel Actions
    • Supervise Financial Readiness Actions
    • Employ Military Justice
    • Supervise Supply Activities
    • Conduct Preventive Maintenance Checks and Services
    • Write in the Army Style
    • Conduct a Military Briefing
    • Communicate Effectively in a Given Situation
    • Conduct Drill and Ceremonies
    • Apply Characteristics of Profession to Officer Service
    • Identify Ways Values Affect Leader Obligations
    • Comply w/Joint Ethics Regulation Requirements
    • Create a Climate that Fosters Ethical Behavior
    • Apply the Just War Tradition
    • Resolve an Ethical Problem
    • Implement a Total Fitness Program
    • Conduct Risk Assessment
    • Implement Preventive Medicine Measures
    • Enforce Detection Prevention Measures
    • Defend Yourself and Unit Against Terrorism
    • Operate an M60 Machine Gun
    • Report Intelligence Information
    • Process Captured Materiel
    • Identify Future Threats
    • Employ IEW Assets
    • Navigate While Dismounted
    • Apply Leadership Doctrine to Given Situation
    • Identify Duties/Authority of Officer/WO/NCO/Civ
    • Conduct Pr-Combat Checks
    • Coordinate Activities with Staffs
    • Apply Team Development Techniques
    • Motivate Subordinates to Improve Performance
    • Counsel Subordinates
    • Enforce EO/Sexual Harassment Program
    • Act IAW the Provisions of the Code of Conduct
    • Comply w/Environmental Laws/Regulations
    • Apply Branch Information to Career Decisions
    • Apply Customs and Traditions of the Service
    • Integrate Mil History into Education of Officers
    • Maintain Assigned Protective Mask
    • React to Chemical/Bio Hazard or Attack
    • Issue an Oral Operations Order
    • Conduct Movement Techniques by Squad
    • React to Direct/Indirect fire
    • Conduct a Defense by Squad Sized Unit
    • Control Entry into a Restricted Area
    • Adjust Indirect Fire
    • Analyze Terrain
    • Apply Principles of War in Mission Planning
    • Conduct Small Unit Operations IAW Law of War
    • Report Casualties
    • Process Captives
    • Communicate by Tactical Radio
    • Communicate by Tactical Telephone
    • Implement Operational Security Measures
    • Protect Classified Information/Material
    • Employ Physical Security Measures
    • Identify Roles/Organization of US Army
    • Train Subordinates to Perform Individual Task
    • Train a Team (or Squad)
    • Train a Squad
    • Operate a M 16A 1 /M 16A2 Rifle
    • Maintain a M16A1/M16A2 Rifle
    • Maintain a M60 Machine Gun
    • Prepare a Range Card for M60 Machine Gun
    • Employ a M1 BA 1 Claymore Mine
    • Employ Hand Grenades

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 293 - Ranger Challenge Training


    Description:
    Prepares students to compete as a team member on the CWU Ranger Challenge team.

    Prerequisites:
    Corequisite: PEF 118.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Construct a one-rope bridge over a river crossing using wireman’s knot, half hitches, swiss seat, and teamwork.
    • Conduct orienteering and land navigation in small teams using all techniques, compass, protractor, grid reference system, and maps.
    • Conduct a 10K team endurance march using military load equipment, packing list, and teamwork.
    • Conduct a hand grenade toss using proper throwing techniques and safety measures.
    • Learn the maintenance of military weaponry, assembly, disassembly, safety checks, and demonstrate operation (function checks).
    • Conduct a physical fitness tests using correct push up, sit up, and running 2 miles.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  
  •  

    MSL 298 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 301 - Leadership and Problem Solving


    Description:
    Students conduct self-assessment of leadership style, develop personal fitness regimen, and learn to plan and conduct individual/small unit tactical training while testing reasoning and problem solving techniques. Students receive direct feedback on leadership abilities. Required for commissioning.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MSL 102.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate how to give a briefing.
    • Demonstrate how to navigate using a map and compass.
    • Develop the use of troop leading procedures.
    • Conduct pre-combat inspections.
    • Write an operations order.
    • Conduct an after action review.
    • Apply movement formations, operations order, drill and ceremony, offensive operations, land navigation, and defensive operations to situational exercises.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 301LAB - Military Science and Tactics III Laboratory


    Description:
    Requires concurrent enrollment in MSL 301. Practical experience and application in first aid, weapons, communications, and advanced land navigation.

    Prerequisites:
    Corequisite: MSL 301.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to perform:

    • First Aid
    • Communications
    • Advanced land navigation

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/21/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 302 - Leadership and Ethics


    Description:
    Students learn small-group leadership methods with emphasis on problem solving and dealing with situational change required for commissioning.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MSL 301.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Practice battle drills 1,2,3,4, & 5.
    • Describe the principles of land navigation.
    • Demonstrate how to conduct an ambush.
    • Identify the principles of patrolling.
    • Demonstrate how to receive and issue an operation order.
    • Demonstrate ability to plan and conduct military operations.
    • Apply battle drills, patrolling, land navigation, and mission planning to numerous situational exercises.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 302LAB - Military Science and Tactics III Laboratory


    Description:
    Practical experience and application in small-unit leadership techniques, and small-unit tactics.

    Prerequisites:
    Corequisite: MSL 302.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to understand:

    • Small Unit Leadership
    • Small Unit Tactics

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/21/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 303 - Leadership and Small Group Tactics


    Description:
    Students learn and demonstrate small-unit tactics and land navigation methods while using advanced problem-solving techniques. Emphasis on decision making and communication skills. Required for commissioning.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MSL 302.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate ability to lead Raid, Ambush, and Reconnaissance patrols.
    • Demonstrate navigation proficiency using a map and a compass.
    • Explain how to cross danger areas.
    • Demonstrate the ability to be a Squad Leader, Platoon Leader, and Platoon Sergeant.
    • Demonstrate proficiency with M16A2.
    • Demonstrate proficiency at MEDEVAC procedures using the 9 line format.
    • Demonstrate ability to write military operation orders and conduct troop leading procedures.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 303LAB - Military Science and Tactics III Laboratory


    Description:
    Practical experience integration of small-unit tactics, land navigation, techniques of fire support, and military skills.

    Prerequisites:
    Corequisite: MSL 303.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to understand:

    • Fire Support
    • Small Unit Tactics

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/21/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 314 - Military History of the United States


    Description:
    A comprehensive and systematic survey and analysis of the American military experience from colonial times through the Vietnam War. MSL 314 and HIST 314 are cross-listed courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Survey America’s military history from the colonial era through the Vietnam War.
    • See military history, broadly defined, encompasses more than battlefield tactics and strategy, war heroes, technology, or professionalism.
    • Study how America’s military experience was at the nexus of foreign policy, political and social change, and economic development.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 392 - Leader Development and Assessment Course Preparation


    Description:
    Practical exercise in small-unit leadership and tactics. Prepares the student for leader development and assessment course.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MSL 302.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Prepare for NALC conducted at Fort Lewis, Washington
    • Challenge, develop and evaluate leadership abilities
    • Test intelligence, common sense, ingenuity and stamina
    • Meet established standards in physical fitness, weapons training, communication, combat patrols and demonstrate their proficiency in other military skills
    • Demonstrate a proficiency in the following areas:
      • Field Leader’s Reaction Course
      • Confidence Training
      • Basic Rifle Marksmanship
      • Automatic Weapons Training
      • Land Navigation
      • Individual Tactical Training
      • Fire Support
      • Hand Grenade
      • Nuclear, Biological Chemical
      • Squad Situational Training Exercises
      • Patrolling Situational Training Exercises
      • Military History (Regimental)
      • Rappelling & Rope Bridge Operations
      • Establish Bivouac
      • Branch Orientation

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 398 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 401 - Leadership and Management


    Description:
    Develops student proficiency in planning and executing complex operations, functioning as a member of a staff, and mentoring subordinates. Students explore training management, methods of effective staff collaboration, and developmental counseling techniques. Required for commissioning.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MSL 303.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Begin the final preparation of training before assuming the obligation of a commissioned officer in our Army.
    • Demonstrate proficiency in the following areas :
      • Communicate effectively in writing.
      • Implement how to coordinate activities with staffs.
      • Conduct proper subordinate counseling.
      • Present briefings.
      • Implement a total fitness program.
      • Apply characteristics of the profession to officer service.
      • Assist in the planning of the Winter FTX
      • Discuss staff coordination process, planning, preparing for and executing class presentation.
      • Describe the Army’s Supply Activities.
      • Refine the After Action Review Process.
      • Prepare and conduct small unit training.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 401LAB - Battalion Staff Operations


    Description:
    Students, assigned to positions as either coordinating or special staff officers within the Wildcat Battalion, design duties and responsibilities associated with their position, and integrate their roles to plan and execute multiple events. May be reapted up to 3 credits.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Design duties and responsibilities using the U.S. Army writing style. Students will establish running estimates for their assigned position to facilitate future planning.
    • Assess and counsel subordinates in accordance with Field Manual 6-22, Leader Development.
    • Plan, execute, and recover from various training, service, and ceremonial events.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 402 - Officership


    Description:
    Study includes case analysis of military culture and practical exercises on establishing a command climate. Students must complete a quarter-long Senior Leadership Project that requires them to plan, organize, collaborate, analyze, and demonstrate their leadership skills. Required for commissioning.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MSL 401.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Begin the final preparation of training before assuming the obligation of a commissioned officer in our Army.
    • Demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:
      • Explain Military Customs and Courtesies.
      • Discuss the Army’s Preventive Maintenance.
      • Communicate effectively in the Army Writing style.
      • Practice training on BOS, METT-T and OCOKA.
      • Use Leadership Counseling.
      • Use stress reduction techniques.
      • Demonstrate time management.
      • Develop assertive skills.
      • Define organizational systems, cultures, and theories.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 402LAB - Staff Integration


    Description:
    Students continue to develop their competence with the duties and responsibilities of coordinating or special staff officers through guided event planning and execution. The position and role of the Special Project Officer is introduced. May be repeated up to 3 credits.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Design duties and responsibilities using the U.S. Army writing style. Students will establish running estimates for their assigned position to facilitate future planning.
    • Use the Military Decision Making Process and Army Doctrinal Publication 5-0 to plan, execute and recover from various training, service, and ceremonial events.
    • Conduct effective command post operations in accordance with Army Training Publication 6-0.5, Command Post Organization and Operations.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 403 - Officership II


    Description:
    Emphasis on analyzing case and situational studies which cover contemporary leadership problems. Required for commissioning.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MSL 402.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Complete the final preparation of training before assuming the obligation of a commissioned officer in our Army.
    • Demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:
      • Plan, organize and execute Spring FTX to Army standards.
      • Communicate effectively in writing.
      • Demonstrate a full understand of the Military Code of Conduct.
      • Use personnel administration.
      • Define values and ethics.
      • Discuss Military Law.
      • Discuss Law of War.
      • Describe the Joint ethics regulations.
      • Demonstrate task organization.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 403LAB - Command and Staff


    Description:
    Students, assigned to positions as either coordinating or special staff officers within the Wildcat Battalion, design duties and responsibilities associated with their position, and integrate their roles to plan and execute multiple events. May be repeated for 3 credits.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Assess and counsel subordinates in accordance with Field Manual 6-22, Leader Development.
    • Plan, execute and recover from various training, service, and ceremonial events.
    • Become familiar with the Army Lessons Learned Program (ALLP) in accordance with Army Regulation 11-3.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    MSL 492 - Leader Development and Assessment Course Internship


    Description:
    Practical exercise in small-unit leadership and tactics. Five-week camp at Ft. Lewis, Washington. Required for commissioning. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: MSL 301, MSL 302, and MSL 303.

    Credits: (8-15)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Attend NALC to incorporate a wide range of training designed to challenge, develop and evaluate leadership abilities.
    • Test intelligence, common sense, ingenuity and stamina.
    • Placed in a variety of leadership positions, many of which simulate stressful situations.
    • Meet established standards in physical fitness, weapons training, communication, combat patrols and demonstrate their proficiency in other military skills.
    • Demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:
      • Field Leader’s Reaction Course
      • Confidence Training
      • Basic Rifle Marksmanship
      • Automatic Weapons Training
      • Land Navigation
      • Individual Tactical Training
      • Fire Support
      • Hand Grenade
      • Nuclear, Biological Chemical
      • Squad Situational Training Exercises
      • Patrolling Situational Training Exercises
      • Military History (Regimental)
      • Rappelling & Rope Bridge Operations
      • Establish Bivouac
      • Branch Orientation

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 496 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 498 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MSL 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Music (MUS)

  
  •  

    MUS 101 - History of Jazz


    Description:
    History of artistic, cultural, and technological developments in jazz, focusing on important players and performances. Introduction to fundamental musical concepts and methods; emphasis on active listening, social justice, current issues. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring). AH-Aesthetic Experience.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: AH-Aesthetic Experience. K3 - Creative Expression

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and describe selected important historical developments, styles, and performers in jazz history.
    • Evaluate jazz performances in their historical, aesthetic, and cultural contexts.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of jazz from the perspectives of aesthetic development, nationalism, race, and gender.
    • Analyze jazz and related music examples using appropriate terminology, and communicate clearly and thoroughly the student’s descriptions of and reflections on jazz music.
    • Analyze the ways that technology and industry have influenced the social, cultural, and artistic development of jazz in the past and in contemporary society.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/7/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 102 - Introduction to Music


    Description:
    Landmark composers, styles, and works of Western music history from the Middle Ages to the present. Fundamental musical concepts (melody, harmony, rhythm, form, etc.) are emphasized to develop student understanding and listening skills. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring). AH-Aesthetic Experience.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: AH-Aesthetic Experience. K3 - Creative Expression

    General Education Pathways: P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and describe the fundamental elements, such as melody, harmony, rhythm, sonority, and form. 
    • Demonstrate an understanding of a basic narrative of Western music history, including details about representative composers, pieces, and genres. 
    • Describe and differentiate musical style characteristics related to the different periods and genres of Western music. 
    • Demonstrate an understanding of traditions associated with concert attendance, including concert etiquette, in a variety of performance settings. 

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/21/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 103 - History of Rock and Roll


    Description:
    History of Rock and Roll, America’s second indigenous musical art form, after jazz. Emphasis placed on artists, music genres, and cultural/societal forces shaping rock’s evolution, 1950s to present. Extensive listening, reading; required online discussion. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring). AH-Aesthetic Experience.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: AH-Aesthetic Experience. K3 - Creative Expression

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P4 Social Justice, P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Employ precise musical and cultural terminology and concepts for the discussion and analysis of rock music and its history.
    • Describe the influence of American and British cultural and historical traditions upon rock music, including various manifestations of racial, sexual, and gender inequality.
    • Compare and contrast different examples of rock music as well as other contemporaneous popular music, demonstrating an understanding of the musical and cultural commonalities and distinctions between them.
    • Evaluate rock music using aesthetic criteria, musical analysis, and critical judgment.
    • Describe the geographical aspects of various rock genres’ history and popularity arcs.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    04/21/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 105 - Introduction to World Music


    Description:
    An interdisciplinary exploration of the many roles played by music in traditional societies, with emphasis on music’s social functions, life contexts, and influence on self-identity. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ENG 101.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K4 - Global Dynamics

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P4 Social Justice, P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze the impact of global and local issues on the development of traditional music, especially those that affect its viability and preservation.
    • Evaluate the roles that music plays in traditional cultures that reinforce or break down patterns of socioeconomic and political inequalities in those societies and in the global village.
    • Identify key concepts and strategies that foster stewardship activities to promote, advocate, and celebrate traditional music and cultures associated with them.
    • Evaluate the influence of traditional music on global culture, including the phenomena of music fusion, ethnonationalism, and global music forms (e. g. jazz and world beat.)
    • Integrate ethnomusicological theories with field research and observations to generate coherent models that can be used to interpret and apply data in a real-world setting.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/21/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 120 - Composition 1


    Description:
    Introduction to composition addressing such topics as phrase structure, melodic development, modulations, textures, and transitions. Small compositional projects emphasizing certain stylistic traits for piano and other genres. May be repeated up to  3 credits.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: MUS 145 and MUS 145A with a C or higher.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify forms and structural elements in compositions including: form, phrase structure, modulations, and transitions.
    • Aurally identify, discuss, and analyze formal structures of a composition including: form, key centers, modulation, secondary functions, tonicization, chromaticism, change of orchestration, transitions, types of modulation, and compositional techniques.
    • Be able to identify the performance practice of certain composers.
    • Recognize the “voice” certain composers exemplify in their music and understand what characterizes such a voice and find ways to begin to create their own “voice”.
    • Incorporate terminology/techniques pertaining to melodic development, form, structure, harmony, style, and compositional techniques.
    • Compose original works incorporating theoretical knowledge while developing a creative and unique “voice”.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/3/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 143 - Introduction to Music Theory


    Description:
    Introduction of fundamental music theory: scales, keys, meter, and rhythm, triads, ear-training, and keyboard fundamentals. Course is designed for non-majors seeking basic musical skills, and for music majors with limited theoretical backgrounds. Does not count toward a music degree.

    Credits: (3)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 144 - Theory 1


    Description:
    Basic theoretical concepts dealing with fundamental elements of common-practice period melody, harmony, and rhythm. This course is the first in the six-course harmony sequence. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: online fundamental exam with 75% or higher, or successful completion of the online fundamental course. Co-requisite: MUS 152A.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply fundamental concepts through written comprehension of clefs, scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, and seventh chords.
    • Demonstrate the fundamentals of harmonic function and progression.
    • Identify a variety of written rhythmic patterns.
    • Write major and minor scales, intervals, triads, seventh chords, and apply written solfege to short tonal excerpts.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 144A - Aural Skills 1


    Description:
    Basic fundamental concepts of common-practice period melody, harmony, and rhythm through ear training, sight-singing, dictation, rhythm, and basic keyboard applications. This course is the first in the three quarter, first year aural skills sequence. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: online fundamental exam with 75% or higher, or successful completion of the online fundamental course. Co-requisite: MUS 152A.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply fundamental concepts through aural comprehension and identification of clefs, scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, and seventh chords.
    • Notate short melodic and harmonic diatonic dictation exercises.
    • Perform a variety of rhythmic patterns at sight.
    • Sing, using solfege, major and minor scales, intervals, triads, seventh chords, and short tonal melodies.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 145 - Theory 2


    Description:
    Basic theoretical concepts dealing with fundamental elements of common-practice period melody, harmony, rhythm, and voice leading as demonstrated through analytical and compositional perspectives. This course is the second in the six-course harmony sequence. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: MUS 144 and MUS 144A with grades of C or higher. Co-requisite: MUS 145A and MUS 152A or MUS 153A.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply fundamental concepts through written comprehension of clefs, scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, seventh chords, figured bass, phrase structure, and cadence types.
    • Demonstrate the fundamentals of harmonic function and progression.
    • Identify a variety of rhythmic patterns.
    • Write major and minor scales, intervals, triads, seventh chords, realize figured bass, diagram phrase structure, and cadence types.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 145A - Aural Skills 2


    Description:
    Basic fundamental concepts of common-practice period melody, harmony, and rhythm through ear training, sight-singing, dictation, rhythm, and basic keyboard applications. This course is the second in the three quarter, first year aural skills sequence. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: MUS 144 and MUS 144A with grades of C or higher. Co-requisite: MUS 145A and MUS 152A or MUS 153A.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply fundamental concepts through aural comprehension and identification of clefs, scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, seventh chords, figured bass, phrase structure, and cadence types.
    • Notate short melodic and harmonic diatonic dictation exercises.
    • Perform a variety of rhythmic patterns at sight.
    • Sing, using solfege, major and minor scales, intervals, triads, seventh chords, and short tonal melodies.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 146 - Theory 3


    Description:
    Basic theoretical concepts dealing with fundamental elements of common-practice period melody, harmony, rhythm, and voice leading as demonstrated through analytical and compositional perspectives. This course is the third in the six-course harmony sequence. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MUS 145 and MUS 145A with grades of C or higher. Co-requisite: MUS 146A and MUS 154A or MUS 153A or MUS 154A.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply fundamental concepts through written comprehension of clefs, scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, seventh chords, figured bass, and cadence types.
    • Demonstrate the fundamentals of harmonic function and progression.
    • Apply fundamental concepts through written comprehension of non-chord tones (embellishing tones), resolution of dominant seventh chords, diatonic seventh chords, phrase structure, and texture types.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 146A - Aural Skills 3


    Description:
    Basic fundamental concepts of common-practice period melody, harmony, and rhythm through ear training, sight-singing, dictation, rhythm, and basic keyboard applications. This course is the third in the three quarter, first year aural skills sequence. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MUS 145 and MUS 145A with grades of C or higher. Co-requisite: MUS 146A and MUS 154A or MUS 153A or MUS 154A.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply fundamental concepts through aural comprehension and identification of clefs, scales, key signatures, intervals, triads, seventh chords, figured bass, and cadence types.
    • Apply fundamental concepts through aural comprehension and identification of non-chord tones (embellishing tones), resolution of dominant seventh chords, diatonic seventh chords, and texture types.
    • Perform a variety of rhythmic patterns at sight.
    • Sing, using solfege, major and minor scales, intervals, triads, seventh chords, and short tonal melodies.
    • Notate short melodic and harmonic diatonic dictation exercises.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 152A - Class Piano I


    Description:
    Group instruction providing beginning skills to prepare for the piano proficiency requirement and to reinforce music theory concepts. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Co-requisites: MUS 144 and MUS 144A.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of clefs, note reading, hand position, posture, score markings, and basic terminology related to beginning piano students.
    • Be able to play standard scales with correct fingering.
    • Demonstrate proficiency of reading skills, technique, and rhythm through assigned beginning solo repertoire.
    • Demonstrate basic transposition skills of beginning level excerpts.
    • Be able to demonstrate basic harmonic progressions as presented in concurrent music theory class.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of basic theoretical concepts through keyboard applications.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 153A - Class Piano II


    Description:
    Group instruction providing beginning/intermediate skills to prepare for the piano proficiency requirement and to reinforce music theory concepts. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MUS 152A.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of clefs, note reading, hand position, posture, score markings, and basic terminology related to beginning/intermediate piano students.
    • Be able to play standard scales with correct fingering.
    • Demonstrate proficiency of reading skills, technique, and rhythm through assigned beginning/intermediate solo repertoire.
    • Demonstrate basic transposition skills of beginning/intermediate level excerpts.
    • Be able to demonstrate basic harmonic progressions as presented in concurrent music theory class.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of basic theoretical concepts through keyboard applications.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 154 - Class Instruction


    Description:
    May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites:
    Each course prerequisite to the next numeral (A.) Piano I, II, III; (B.) Voice I, II; (H.) Guitar I, II. Course fees do apply.

    Credits: (1)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 154A - Class Piano III


    Description:
    Group instruction providing intermediate skills to prepare for the piano proficiency requirement and to reinforce music theory concepts. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: MUS 153A.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of clefs, note reading, hand position, posture, score markings, and basic terminology related to intermediate piano students.
    • Play standard scales with correct fingering.
    • Demonstrate proficiency of reading skills, technique, and rhythm through assigned intermediate solo repertoire.
    • Demonstrate basic transposition skills of intermediate level excerpts.
    • Demonstrate basic harmonic progressions as presented in concurrent music theory class.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of basic theoretical concepts through keyboard applications.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 154B - Class Voice for the Non-major


    Description:
    This course is designed for the non-major beginning voice student. Through group instruction the fundamentals of proper vocal production will be introduced and practiced; concepts of breathing, resonance and articulation. Students will prepare group songs and individual solos by the end of the quarter. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: each course prerequisite to the next numeral (A.) Piano I, II, III; (B.) Voice I, II; (H.) Guitar I, II.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Properly use vocal and musical terminology and skills related to the study of voice.
    • Sing with confidence and poise.
    • Demonstrate command of beginning vocal skills.
    • Demonstrate various approaches to the fundamentals of vocal technique: breathing, resonance and articulation in their own singing.
    • Identify their range and demonstrate beginning mastery of the vocal registers.
    • Demonstrate fundamental concepts of diction: vowel formation, legato singing and free articulation of consonants.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 164 - Major Applied Area (Individual Instruction)


    Description:
    Instruction available in performance areas A-H and K. Department consent required. May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate musicianship through the artistic mastery of the instrument.
    • Acquire beginning pedagogical knowledge of the instrument.
    • Demonstrate beginning/intermediate proficiency in rhythm, sight-reading, and style.
    • Acquire knowledge and develop beginning/intermediate performance ability through the study of basic literature of the instrument appropriate to the level of study.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 171 - Secondary Applied Area (Individual Instruction)


    Description:
    Private study on instruments secondary to a student’s major performance area. Intended particularly for beginning students who wish to develop additional skills on an instrument or in voice to enrich their total music background. Instruction available in performance areas A-I and K. May be repeated for credit. One credit any quarter, may be repeated.

    Credits: (1)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 171A - Secondary Applied Area Piano


    Description:
    Private study on instruments secondary to a student’s major performance area. Intended particularly for beginning students who wish to develop additional skills on an instrument or in voice to enrich their total music background. By permission. May be repeated for credit. One credit any quarter, may be repeated.

    Credits: (1)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 198 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 210 - Vocal Jazz Choir


    Description:
    Must attend all scheduled rehearsals and performances. An ensemble specializing in performance of repertoire from jazz choir tradition established in the Northwest and beyond. Limited to SATB singers and rhythm-section instruments. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: student must be freshmen or sophomore standing.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate characteristic jazz tone quality on their instruments and voices.
    • Demonstrate characteristic jazz phrasing and style on their instruments and voices.
    • Work together to create a cohesive group sound with an overall high quality artistic, emotional and technical impact.
    • Perform a wide variety of music composed and arranged for the vocal jazz ensemble.
    • Improvise in a vocal jazz ensemble setting, including musical interaction within the ensemble.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/7/2006

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 211 - Women’s Choir


    Description:
    May be repeated for credit. Two hours of rehearsal per week plus all scheduled rehearsals and performances.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: student must be freshmen or sophomore standing.

    Credits: (1)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 213 - Flute Choir


    Description:
    Previous experience in flute performance and permission of instructor. Two hours of rehearsal per week plus all scheduled rehearsals and performances.  May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: students must be freshmen or sophomore standing.

    Credits: (1)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 214 - Brass Choir


    Description:
    Two hours of rehearsal per week plus all scheduled rehearsals and performances. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: student must be freshmen or sophomore standing.

    Credits: (1)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    MUS 215 - Chamber Orchestra


    Description:
    Two hours rehearsal per week plus all scheduled rehearsals and performances. By audition. May be repeated for credit. Course will be offered every year (Winter and Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: student must be freshmen or sophomore standing.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate fundamentals of proper tonal production including
    • Improve their recognition of aural skills including using intervals, rhythms, and listening to other sections in the ensemble
    • Perform quality music of varying time periods in the appropriate style
    • Practice sight reading skills

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
 

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