Jan 29, 2023  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Courses numbered from 101–299 are lower-division courses, primarily for freshmen and sophomores; those numbered from 300–499 are upper-division courses, primarily for juniors and seniors. The numbers 296, 396, 496, and 596 designate individual study courses and are available for registration by prior arrangement with the course instructor and approval of the department chair.

The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the amount of credit each course carries. Variable credit courses include the minimum and maximum number of the credits within parentheses.

Not all of the courses are offered every quarter. Final confirmation of courses to be offered, information on new courses and programs, as well as a list of hours, instructor, titles of courses and places of class meetings, is available online in My CWU which can be accessed through the the CWU home page, and go to www.cwu.edu/registrar/course-information

 

Physics (PHYS)

  
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    PHYS 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PHYS 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PHYS 499 - Seminar


    Credits: (1)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Political Science (POSC)

  
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    POSC 101 - Introduction to Politics


    Description:
    This course explores the meanings of power, political actors, resources of power and how they are being used for what purposes, under what ideological, institutional and policy processes affecting our quality of life. SB-Foundations of Human Adaptations and Behavior (W).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: SB-Foundations of Human Adaptations and Behavior (W). K6 - Individual & Society

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being, P4 Social Justice, P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the basic terminologies, concepts, political processes, and theories in the study of politics and power structure
    • Students will distinguish the issues of “what to see,” “why,” and “how to see” in real world situations:  recognize the dynamic and complex structure of power within which diverse political issues occur.
    • Analyze and identify political actors, their resources of power, and the interconnections between political, social and economic power.
    • Appraise how citizens in a given society can effectively participate in political processes and impact government’s policy decisions
    • Explain how various types of political ideologies, political culture, government institutions, levels of industrialization, geographic location and current globalization phenomena affect people’s lives.
    • Apply knowledge and critical thinking skills to about “things political” to stimulate continued inquiries in the study of politics.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/7/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    POSC 210 - American Politics


    Description:
    Origin and development of the United States government; structure, political behavior, organizations, and processes; rights and duties of citizens. SB-Perspectives on Cultures and Experiences of U.S.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: SB-Perspectives on Cultures and Experiences of U.S. K2 - Community, Culture, & Citizenship

    General Education Pathways: P1 Civic & Community Engagement, P3 Perspectives on Current Issues

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize the procedures and purposes of the major US institutions (Congress, Presidency, Courts and Federalism.)
    • Describe and explain the historical development of US political culture and voter preferences.
    • Analyze how individual citizens collect political information and develop values and policy preferences, and express them through political participation.
    • Examine evolving rights & responsibilities in US Constitution, Bill of Rights and appraise their effects upon US political development, culture, diversity and citizenship.
    • Evaluate major historical and current public policy debates and differentiate arguments and positions.
    • Identify collective decision making procedures of the US government; apply disciplinary models to explain outcomes.
    • Identify and explain basic concepts of American politics and government used in political science and the real world.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/7/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    POSC 230 - State and Local Government


    Description:
    Examination of the government structures and politics of federal, states, urban regions, and suburbs. Inter-jurisdictional agreement and conflict occurring because of overgrowth or development of these regions.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understanding of the unique responsibilities and interrelationships between local and state governments to one another.
    • Choose the proper components of governments for each of the different levels of government.
    • Explain the functioning and responsibilities of each level of government to their respective constituencies.
    • Identify cases where government officials failed to perform their duties appropriately.
    • Provide examples where failure to coordinate across governmental organizations and describe how to prevent problems in the future.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/20/2020

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 250 - Language and Power


    Description:
    This course surveys political uses of language and consequences for society.  It covers concepts in cultural politics, identity politics, and sociolinguistics. Students propose plans to use language to make societies more just and sustainable. WLC 250 and POSC 250 are cross-listed courses; a student may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize, define, and explain key concepts in cultural politics, identity politics, and sociolinguistics
    • Recognize and reflect on how key concepts in cultural politics, identity politics, and sociolinguistics inform their own experiences with language, power, and wellbeing in their personal, social, professional and economic lives
    • Identify and describe relationships between the exercise of power and use of language in politics, public policy, education, the work place, media, and the arts
    • Recognize, appraise, and compare beneficial and detrimental consequences to individuals, communities, and societies of different uses of language for specific purposes and in different places and historical periods
    • Propose and outline plans to use language to improve political participation, systems of justice, community development, employment policies, public funding for the arts and media, K-12 education, second-language education, or language revitalization programs to make multicultural and multilingual communities and societies more healthy, just, and sustainable.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/21/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 260 - Comparative Politics


    Description:
    Comparative political analysis, utilizing a variety of methods and theoretical approaches; application to selected western and non-western systems. Recommended to precede other courses in comparative politics. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K6 - Individual & Society

    General Education Pathways: P1 Civic & Community Engagement, P3 Perspectives on Current Issues

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify basic concepts, processes, and theories of Comparative Politics
    • Identify comparative political issues in an historical and contemporary context
    • Explain the formal connections between political, social and economic power and governmental performance across countries
    • Analyze the impact of politics, culture, history and economics on contemporary political systems and develop answers to address these problems.
    • Explain how the structures of governance affect comparative institutional performance as concerns issues of equality and equity.
    • Apply knowledge and critical thinking skills to address the performance of diverse national political systems.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/2/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 270 - International Relations


    Description:
    This course explores political issues and theories in international relations. This class will focus on issues of war and peace, international law and organization, foreign policy, diplomatic history, and international political economy. SB-Perspectives on World Cultures (W).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: SB-Perspectives on World Cultures (W). K4 - Global Dynamics

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the basic concepts, processes, and theories of international relations.
    • Identify global issues in an historical and contemporary context.
    • Explain ithe connections between global inequality and political, social and economic power.
    • Analyze the impact of politics, culture, history and economics on contemporary global issues and develop answers to address these problems.
    • Explain how gender, economic class, ethnicity and sexuality impact human rights in international relations.
    • Apply knowledge and critical thinking skills to address global problems.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/2/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    POSC 280 - Introduction to Western Political Thought


    Description:
    This course explores political thought in the West from its origins in Ancient Greece through the 20th century. This course examines concepts such as democracy, religious freedom, ethics, realism, citizenship, and human nature. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Spring, and Summer).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K5 - Humanities

    General Education Pathways: P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify basic concepts, processes, and theories of normative political theory
    • Identify normative political issues after reading the works of normative political theorists
    • Explain the connections between the normative concepts and insights of the past (ancient, medieval, etc..) and contemporary issues including religious freedom, democracy, and social justice.
    • Analyze western normative concepts and interpretations of the human experience with concepts and interpretations from non-western thinkers and traditions.
    • Identify and analyze how our normative assumptions and presuppositions shape our response to issues of social justice around the globe.
    • Analyze how religious traditions and normative political thought have shaped the human experience.
    • Explain and analyze how ideas concerning gender, sexuality, race, class and ethnicity have been utilized to promote social justice over various historical periods.
    • Discuss social justice from multiple historical, religious, and ethical perspectives and explain what factors that make social justice difficult to obtain and maintain.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/2/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 298 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 311 - Women and Politics


    Description:
    The politics of human sexuality: men’s and women’s rights, sex roles, sexual discrimination, laws governing sexuality, and related issues.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 313 - The Legislative Process


    Description:
    The Congress of the United States, drafting of bills, legislative leadership, the committee system, relation to executive and judicial branches, pressure groups.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 314 - American Presidency


    Description:
    The office of the chief executive: its constitutional, political, and administrative processes.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 315 - Political Campaigns and Elections


    Description:
    Evaluations of campaign techniques and practices; campaign financing and expenditures; voting behavior; election theory; elections and public policy.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 316 - Latinos and the U.S. Political System


    Description:
    This course examines the political reality of Latinos in the United States: a diverse population made up largely of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban American, and other Latinos of Central and South American origins.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the history of the Latina/o population political relations with and experiences in the US political system.
    • Demonstrate knowledge on the variety of methods and theories utilized to approach, analyze, and understand the Latina/o political experience in the United States.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the history of political organizations from mutual aid societies to contemporary civil rights organizations.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the nature of Latino electoral behavior and political participation.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of basic policy issues (Immigration, education, criminal justice, language policy, foreign policy, and the economy) affecting the largest ethnic racial minority in the US.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the Latina/o community experience towards power, authority, role of government, and actions taken by governmental bodies.
    • Use library resources and Internet research tools to find scholarly information about research questions.
    • Incorporate knowledge acquired in the course in a written report on a topic of students’ choice.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/17/2008

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 318 - Political Parties and Interest Groups


    Description:
    Theories of party systems; elitism and pluralism; party organization, functions, and activities; status, functions, and activities of interest groups in the public policy-making process.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 320 - Public Administration


    Description:
    Setting, purpose, functions, and performance of public bureaucracy in the United States.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 325 - Introduction to Public Policy


    Description:
    Institutional context, politics and processes of agenda setting and policy formulation, implementation, evaluation, change and termination in the United States.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examination of the various theoretical approaches towards public policy
    • Identify policy concepts common to nations of the world.
    • Compare and contrast the various constituencies, ideas, knowledge, political forces affecting public policy in different political systems.
    • Discriminate, through the comparative method, how different political and governmental structures affect each of the stages of the policy process.
    • Critique and analyze policy development and implementation from a variety of selected countries.
    • Determine the difficult points in the development and implementation of public policy.
    • Identify, describe and analyze the effects of historical, cultural, and socioeconomic factors on how public policy has been traditionally formulated and implemented.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/7/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    POSC 340 - Politics and American Capitalism


    Description:
    A survey of the interrelationship of the worlds of politics and business enterprise in American history; analysis of relevant philosophical and ideological arguments; case studies in such areas as industrial and trade policy.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 341 - Politics and Religion


    Description:
    The impact of religion upon American political thought and behavior.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 342 - U.S. Foreign Policy


    Description:
    Factors, processes, and techniques in the formulation and execution of the foreign policy of the United States.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand something of the historical background and context of American foreign policy.
    • Recognize the existence of multiple “actors” in the making of American foreign policy at the national, governmental level.
    • Gain an appreciation and comprehension of the interrelationships between internal, domestic factors such as fundamental cultural values and interest groups, and the formulation of policy at the national, governmental level.
    • Critically analyze and evaluate the appropriateness of given policies from the standpoint of different participants and from the standpoint of those to whom such policies are directed.
    • Understand the different models and frameworks utilized by political scientists in the study of American foreign policy.
    • Understand the basic theoretical or comparative framework for identifying similarities and dissimilarities among the world’s varied political systems.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/8/1998

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 343 - The Politics of the U.S. Mexico Border


    Description:
    This course examines the politics of the United States and Mexico border region focusing on the important role of the state in the development of policies affecting one of the longest border regions in the world. Topics covered in the course include the politics of border regions and the national state, and the diverse policy concerns of the region from economic development and immigration, to ecological degradation, and health concerns.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the various terms associated with the study of borders, frontiers, borderlands, and boundaries.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the various theories of the state, power and political economy and their application to the US-Mexico border region.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the history of US-Mexico relations and their impact in the development of the border region from the Mexican American War to contemporary times.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the basic policy issues, specific to the US-Mexico border region (economic development, immigration, urbanization, ecological degradation, and security concerns).
    • Use library resources and Internet research tools to find information about research questions.
    • Incorporate knowledge acquired in the course in a written report on a topic of the student’s choice.
    • Properly document sources in research and writing, as well as organize, present, and communicate opinions in thoughtful and coherent fashion.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the US-Mexico border region in comparative perspective with other regions in the world.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 344 - Environmental Politics


    Description:
    Introduces contemporary environmental problems and politics. Activities and projects enable students to examine how political systems, institutions, policy processes, movements, perceptions of the environment, and power account for outcomes in environmental policy, administration, and development. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize and identify roles of political systems and institutions, policy processes, movements, and relations of power in creating outcomes observed in environmental policymaking and public administration
    • Examine and describe environmental problems and related ecological processes that pose challenges to sustainable development that must be addressed by political and policy processes
    • Examine contemporary political conflicts and debates related to a particular environmental problem and appraise how these are informed (or not) by research findings on dimensions of the environmental problem
    • Apply models from public policy and the social sciences to assess how relations of power influence the efficacy of solving environmental problems and addressing challenges to sustainable development
    • Formulate and propose political and policy solutions to a particular contemporary environmental problem

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/21/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 350 - Introduction to Public Law (Put on reserve 9/16/19)


    Description:
    Legal bases and structure of governmental organization; fundamental doctrines and principles of constitutional, international, and administrative law. (Put on reserve 9/16/19, will go inactive 8/24/22)

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 361 - Latin American Politics


    Description:
    A comparative introduction to the political systems, cultures, and histories of Latin America and to prominent theories on democracy and political and economic development.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of political systems typical in Latin America
    • Demonstrate knowledge of political cultures of Latin America
    • Explain theories of political and economic development
    • Explain theories of democracy
    • Demonstrate knowledge of one of five countries studied in-depth during the term

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/15/2001

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 362 - European Politics (Put on reserve 9/16/19)


    Description:
    Comparative analysis of political cultures, civil societies, parties and elections, and systems of governance in a selection of European countries. (Put on reserve 9/16/19, will go inactive 8/24/22)

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the essential functions of democratic governance.
    • Demonstrate a satisfactory knowledge of the nomenclature used in each country.
    • Explain how the functional components of states fit together (congruence) and interact to represent and govern polities.
    • Trace the institutionalized patterns through which a given function is accomplished in the selected countries.
    • Deal effectively function/nomenclature problems.
    • Draw lessons and make recommendations to improve effectiveness and/or congruence for countries with problems from successful countries.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 363 - Russian Politics (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    Evolution, patterns, and comparative analyses of the Russian polity. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify, describe, and explain major concepts, themes and theories relevant to non-state actors, institutions, and political behavior of Russian polity/political system
    • Explain and demonstrate effects of Russian history (prerevolutionary, Communist era, post-Communism) on contemporary politics, especially transitions from Communist rule to political system of today
    • Apply political science models and methods of comparative political analysis to Russian system through comparative examination of European and other relevant nations to critically evaluate Russia’s political development
    • Explain and assess Russia’s geopolitical contexts and analyze relations with other nations, international state and non-state actors
    • Develop and ask appropriate questions and utilize appropriate research tools such as comparative case study approaches or expert analysis to critically evaluate a specific topic or controversy in course subject matter and/or current event(s) as well as demonstrate effective written communication

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/17/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 364 - Environmental Conflict and Change


    Description:
    Using an interdisciplinary approach, assess environmental conflicts from historic and contemporary times, interpret how changing roles of ecosystems, economies, and relations of power play in creating conflicts, analyze case studies, and appraise conflict resolution. ENST 364 and POSC 364 are cross-listed courses; a student may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine history of environmental conflict in the Americas
    • Assess contemporary environmental conflicts in historical context
    • Evaluate development and environmental policies as causes of environmental conflict
    • Recognize, describe, and discuss environmental conflicts that interest them
    • Recognize and describe perspectives environmental historians, political scientists, sociologists, and scholars of political ecology use to interpret environmental conflict and apply vocabularies of natural and social sciences
    • Apply knowledge to evaluate environmental conflicts that interest them
    • Appraise resolution processes
    • Demonstrate ability to synthesize knowledge about environmental conflicts with interpretation of changing roles of ecosystems, economies, and relations of power in creating environmental conflicts

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/16/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 365 - African Politics


    Description:
    Comparative analysis of the political systems of the African continent, including historical, social, economic, and international contexts.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate basic knowledge of African political geography (e.g., country locations, names, colonial rulers, leaders, etc.)
    • Demonstrate mastery of various analytic concepts, facts, and political science models (within sub-field of comparative politics) and how they apply in the African context and/or to African political systems
    • Improve research, analytical and written communication skills

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/2003

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 366 - Government and Politics of East Asia


    Description:
    An introduction to the politics and governments of selected East Asian countries. Focus will center on China, Japan, and Korea.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 367 - Politics of Japan


    Description:
    Investigation and analysis of politics and government in contemporary Japan.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 369 - Korean Politics


    Description:
    Political systems, institutions, and processes of contemporary North and South Korea.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 372 - Politics of Globalization


    Description:
    Inquiry in the nature and trends of globalization from the economical, political, and cultural perspectives, and their impacts on our way of life. Roles of government, non-government organizations, and global institutions will be examined.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of basic terms, concepts, dominant ideologies and theories of globalization since the 1970s.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of major actors, institutions, systems and structures of globalization as powerful new forces of social change.
    • Identify and understand both state power and non-governmental organizations as powerful political actors in the current system of globalization.
    • Identify current issues in globalization studies such as global campaigns for democracy, the economic and cultural dimensions of globalization, and the gendered nature of globalization.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of political resources in globalization (e.g., information technologies, global networking ability, finance, oil, gender, etc.), and their impacts on our daily lives.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the meanings of Americanization and globalization through analysis of economic and cultural dimensions of current path of globalization.
    • Demonstrate how to investigate the dynamic nature of globalization that involves many countries in multi-dimensional areas (e.g., politics, economics, culture, security, environment, gender, etc.).

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2008

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 373 - International Politics of the Pacific Rim


    Description:
    Political and economic relations of the contemporary Pacific Rim. Special focus on North America, Russia, and East Asia.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 375 - The Middle East and International Politics


    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 377 - Model United Nations


    Description:
    Designed to acquaint students with the operations of the United Nations through the study of political positions of member nations. Students should achieve a level of understanding in the use of simulation activities. Maay be repeated up to 6 credits. Permission of department.

    Credits: (1-2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Articulate the foreign policy of the selected country
    • Analyze an issue currently before the United Nations from the selected member nation’s perspective,
    • Explain the rationale, format, and instructional methods of the Model United Nations simulation and Define the structures and general procedures of the United Nations
    • Understand and competently use the rules of procedure, diplomatic protocol, and negotiating techniques common to UN delegates.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/2/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    POSC 378 - International Political Economy


    Description:
    Political problems of management and development in the global economy and the prospects for creating improved mechanisms at the international level and for less-developed countries.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of basic terms, concepts, dominant ideologies and theories of international political economy (IPE) since WWIl.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of major actors, institutions, systems and structures of IPE in contemporary society.
    • Identify current issues in IPE such as trade regime, transnational corporate structure, international debt trap, politics of industrialization and development, and the gendered nature of IPE.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of political resources in contemporary society (e.g., oil) and how they are used in real world situations affecting people.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the U.S. economic policies and their impact on contemporary IPE system.
    • Demonstrate how to investigate the dynamic and symbiotic relationships between politics and economics in contemporary society.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/16/2008

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    POSC 401 - Nobel Prize Winning Political Scientists


    Description:
    A discussion course that examines the lives and work of five Political Scientists from the American academy who have won either the Nobel Peace Prize or the prize in economics. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine the thinking and approaches from various scientific disciplines that defined the lives and careers of the Nobel Prize winners.
    • Write a short topical review article based on the assigned readings from each Nobel Laureate. (At least one of the articles must deal with the specified criteria in Health and Well Being and the Ways of Knowing pathways.)
    • Synthesize and evaluate a trend from class postings in a short class presentation for each segment.
    • Propose, compose and write a paper on the Prize, the winner(s) and some idea or body of work and prepare a presentation for the final class sessions and @ SOURCE.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 410 - Contemporary Issues in American Politics


    Description:
    Focus on specific contemporary issues in US politics, with emphasis on in-depth analysis and utilization of available research tools. Subject matter will vary by instructor and with the changing nature of the American political scene.

    Credits: (3-5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify, describe, and explain relevant disciplinary and topical concepts in current American polity (politics, government, political economy, policy, etc.)
    • Analyze, discuss and assess contemporary issues in sub­field and controversies surrounding politics and policy of such issues experts in the field as well as political practitioners
    • Develop and ask appropriate question(s) and prepare appropriate research design methodologies to specific topic or controversy in course subject matter and/or current event(s)
    • Utilize, illustrate and apply political science models and research tools to come to an appropriate conclusion as well as relate political science literature to “real world” political and policy issues of the day

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 411 - American Indian Politics and Sovereignty


    Description:
    Examines American Indians as sovereign nations and as participants in U.S. politics. Provides historical and contemporary overview of legal and political experiences of native Americans in the USA.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Synthesize the political impacts in the creation of contemporary Indian Country and Indian Governance across the different arenas of interaction and time frames.
    • Appraise the relevance of key concepts (e.g., sovereignty, self-determination) in different contexts and revise/modify concepts to fit circumstances (e.g., Dakota Access Pipeline).
    • Evaluate the effectiveness of tribal rights under different conditions (i.e., historical eras, court cases, etc.).
    • Develop strategies for the effective application of tribal rights in the changing American Political landscape.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/16/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    POSC 429 - Research Seminar in Public Policy


    Description:
    Review of theory and methods, proposal for policy analysis, preparation, and presentation of policy analysis.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: POSC 320 or POSC 325 or by permission.

    Credits: (3-5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Gather factual data and apply them to real societal problems in public policy.
    • Demonstrate an ability to select among alternative academic models of the policy process; critically analyze and evaluate existing public policy case studies.
    • Utilize a variety of concepts and models to evaluate public policy problems, offer recommendations to guide decision making or evaluate decisions already made for feedback or adjustment in approach.
    • Demonstrate and employ effective professional communication of oral and written formats through invention, organization, drafting, revision, editing and presentation.
    • Participate, collaborate, and communicate effectively within groups with an emphasis on listening, analytical and reflective thinking, and speaking.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 441 - Politics and Film


    Description:
    Since its inception, film has been used to convey political ideas and ideologies, as well as offer social and political criticism. This class will examine the techniques film directors and writers use to “manipulate” the viewing audience.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 451 - Introduction to Constitutional Law (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    Role of the United States Supreme Court in shaping governmental structure of the United States. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 452 - The Constitution and Human Rights


    Description:
    Role of the United States Supreme Court in the development of political and social rights.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 453 - The Constitution and War


    Description:
    Americans like to believe that the Constitution is a constant–in effect during times of peace and during times of war. The truth is more complicated. If history is our guide, the Constitution has been far more “flexible” in times of was than most Americans would like to admit. This class examines how the nation and its presidents have applied the Constitution during times of extreme crisis.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the challenges facing policy makers when balancing freedom and security in times of war and crisis.
    • Compare and contrast the American policies during the “War on Terror” with policies during previous wars and crises.
    • Differentiate between legal and political solutions to security crises over time.
    • Identify and understand major shifts in policy regarding civil liberties in times of war or crises.
    • Apply knowledge of war time civil liberties law to current events and topics.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 460 - Contemporary Issues in Comparative Politics


    Description:
    Focus on a specific contemporary issue in the field of comparative politics, with an emphasis on in-depth analysis and utilization of available research tools. Subject matter will vary with the instructor and with the changing nature of world politics. May be repeated by sub-topic two times, for a maximum of 10 credits.

    Credits: (3-5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify, describe, and explain concepts and theories relevant to contemporary comparative politics (politics, government, political economy, policy, etc. across more than one polity or national political system)
    • Analyze, discuss and assess contemporary issues in sub­field and controversies surrounding politics and policy of such issues experts in the field as well as political practitioners
    • Develop and ask appropriate question(s) and prepare appropriate research design methodologies such as qualitative or quantitative comparative case study approaches to specific topic or controversy in course subject matter and/or current event(s)
    • Utilize, illustrate and apply political science models and research tools to come to an appropriate conclusion as well as relate political science literature to “real world” political and policy issues of the day

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 470 - Contemporary Issues in International Relations


    Description:
    Focus on specific contemporary issues in the field of international politics, with an emphasis on in-depth analysis and utilization of available research tools. Subject matter will vary with the instructor and with the changing nature of world politics. May be repeated by sub-topic two times, for a maximum of 10 credits.

    Credits: (3-5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify, describe, and explain concepts and theories relevant to contemporary international politics (politics, policy and relationships between nations or across the global geo-political system)
    • Analyze, discuss and assess contemporary issues in sub­field and controversies surrounding politics and policy of such issues experts in the field as well as political practitioners
    • Develop and ask appropriate question(s) and prepare appropriate research design methodologies such as qualitative or quantitative cross-national approaches to specific topic or controversy in course subject matter and/or current event(s)
    • Utilize, illustrate and apply political science models and research tools to come to an appropriate conclusion as well as relate political science literature to “real world” political and policy issues of the day

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 475 - International Human Rights


    Description:
    A survey of internationally recognized human rights, analysis of relevant international laws, case studies in women’s rights, minority rights, and humanitarian policies.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the important political actors (states, IGOs, NGOs) in international relations who affect human rights
    • Identify what international human rights consists of
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical development of international human rights
    • Identify international laws that protect human rights
    • Identify policies to protect human rights

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/3/2008

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 481 - Early Political Thought (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    Plato to Machiavelli. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 482 - Early Modern Political Thought


    Description:
    Political thought in the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 483 - Recent Political Thought


    Description:
    Political thought in the 19th and 20th centuries.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 485 - American Political Thought and Culture


    Description:
    The ideas and circumstances that have shaped the political culture of the U.S., as reflected in the works of selected political theorists, politicians, and literary figures.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Know different conceptions of democracy
    • Know the influence of religion on American culture
    • Know the influence of ideas of racial and gender equality
    • Know the influence of ideas of economic justice
    • Know the implications of the interplay between federal and state governments
    • Understand the influence of individual thinkers, religious leaders, and politicians
    • Understand the historical evolution of our system

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/6/2003

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 488 - Introduction to Political Science Methods and Research


    Description:
    Class will introduce students to the research methods of political scientists. Taught in a seminar format, the class will engage in an original research project culminating in a peer-reviewed article submission to an academic journal. Students will learn to write literature reviews, collect data, analyze data using SPSS, and write academic research papers. By instructor permission.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Construct basic causal models using multiple Independent variables and a singular dependent variable.
    • Reproduce a literature review of the given research project by examining the previous research on the given topic.
    • Collect data for the given research project using the Internet, online databases, and participant interviews.
    • Organize and compile collected data into SPSS worksheets.
    • Analyze collected data using basic statistical methodologies.
    • Compose a research paper summarizing the finding of the collected and analyzed data.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/6/2009

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 489 - Senior Assessment


    Description:
    A “capstone” course designed to assess students’ mastery of fundamental knowledge of politics and of writing and analytical skills.

    Prerequisites:
    Co- or prerequisites: POSC 101, POSC 210, POSC 260, POSC 270, and either POSC 481, POSC 482, POSC 483, or POSC 485 and senior standing.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Develop, or one hopes, further refine students’ writing skills in the context of the study of politics.
    • Read primary and secondary sources in the student’s chosen research area.
    • Review and be able to demonstrate knowledge of the fundamentals and foundation of the discipline of political science at the undergraduate level.
    • Demonstrate an acceptable level of analytical and research skills.
    • Evaluate, by way of the end-of-course questionnaire, the faculty of this department, its curriculum, and its program.
    • Develop, in the process of the course, a greater understanding of the nature of the discipline of political science.
    • Develop, in the process of the course, an appreciation of the diversity and complexity of political life from an historical and from a contemporary perspective.
    • Differentiate between subjective values and opinions and objective facts.
    • Learn to organize one’s thoughts and communicate those thoughts in a clear, written form.
    • Become an all-round good person, eat all one’s vegetables, don’t be cruel to animals (unless they deserve it), and struggle against corporate fascism.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  
    Learning Agreement Forms

    POSC 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized, contracted field experience with business, non-profit organizations or government. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. By permission. May be repeated for credit up to maximum of 12 credits. Grade will either be S or U.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  
  •  

    POSC 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    POSC 499 - Seminar


    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Primate Studies (PRIM)

  
  •  

    PRIM 220 - Procedures in Captive Primate Care (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    Laboratory procedures to ensure physical, social, and psychological well-being of captive nonhuman primates: sanitation, safety, medical care, diet, USDA requirements, and socio-psychological factors. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify chimpanzees behaviors and their contextual meanings
    • Gain familiarity with a system of abbreviations for behavioral observations
    • Learn and perform husbandry tasks such as cleaning enclosures around captive chimpanzees. They will understand safety protocols
    • Read about the nature of chimpanzees and their social behavior and the history of the sign language research
    • Learn basic laboratory management
    • Identify individual chimpanzees at CSNW

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 298 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 398 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 450 - Primate Behavior and Ecology Capstone


    Description:
    A capstone course designed to assess students’ mastery of fundamental knowledge of primatology through submission of a portfolio of work collected throughout the program. Includes exit interview with program director.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: senior standing.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Prepare a portfolio of work in primatology.
    • Articulate if and how her or his attitudes have changed during the PBE program.
    • Identify ways for program faculty to improve research and internships experiences provided by the PBE program.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/16/2008

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized, contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. By permission. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 495A - Directed Research in Primatology


    Description:
    By permission. May be repeated for credit. Grade will be either S or U.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Create a testable research hypothesis.
    • Select appropriate data collection method.
    • Collect data relevant to research hypothesis.
    • Write a scientific report.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/16/2008

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 495C - CHCI Directed Research


    Description:
    Directed primatological research at the Chimpanzee and Human Communication Institute. By permission. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PRIM 220 (currently on reserve 9/1/20).

    Credits: (1-10)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Interact with data.
    • Describe research protocols and procedures at CHCI by readings and research tasks.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/16/2008

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 496 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 498 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PRIM 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Psychology (PSY)

  
  •  

    PSY 101 - General Psychology


    Description:
    The study of the basic principles, problems and methods that underlie the science of psychology, including diversity, human development, biological bases of behavior, learning, sensation and perception, cognition, personality, and psychopathology. SB-Foundations of Human Adaptations and Behavior.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: SB-Foundations of Human Adaptations and Behavior. K6 - Individual & Society

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being, P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and interpret basic psychological theory and principles that underlie human behavior and interaction (individual, group, cultural, and societal) with regard to biology, cognition, and emotion.
    • Identify, explain, and apply the different empirical methods used in the subfields of Psychology (research study design, data collection methods, and data analysis).
    • Compare and contrast human behavior, perspectives, and culture through exploration of the human cognitive thought processes.
    • Explain ways in which humans perceive, experience, and interact with the natural and human-made environments
    • Describe and evaluate diversity and similarities with regard to behavior and the thought process in the areas of culture, social, gender, age, and ethnicity.
    • Describe and evaluate the biological bases of behavior and the role of biology in fostering a better understanding of the human condition
    • Describe and evaluate the role of human development in the contribution of behavioral differences.
    • Describe and evaluate abnormal behavior and role in which behavior plays a role in understanding differences among humans and how to foster greater respect, understanding of our differences  and compassion for the human condition.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/16/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    PSY 200 - Introduction to the Major


    Description:
    Orientation to the psychology major. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: must be declared with a psychology major program.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify a range of possible careers in psychology.
    • Select electives appropriate to an initial specialization.
    • Identify practice and research interests of department faculty or community members.
    • Identify opportunities for service learning within psychology.
    • Identify professional organizations pertinent to psychology.
    • Demonstrate how research and practice are interdependent within psychology.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/18/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 205 - Psychology of Adjustment


    Description:
    The nature of the adaptive process and the means by which people adjust to their environment. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer). SB-Foundations of Human Adaptations and Behavior (W).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: SB-Foundations of Human Adaptations and Behavior (W). K6 - Individual & Society

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being, P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Compare and contrast adjustment and personal growth which include major psychological theories used to explain personality development, psychological adjustment, and learning.
    • Examine and discuss the concept of the self and how the social world contributes to self-esteem, self-concept, and self-identity and deciding on a career that leads to satisfaction and fulfillment along with identifying the current issues associated with the workplace.
    • Identify and explain the difference between physical and psychological factors associated with health, including physical and psychological reactions to stress related to the immune system and cognitive processes, eating and living habits that contribute to a healthy life including nutrition, substance abuse, and sleep hygiene.
    • Examine and discuss prejudice and bias and its development along with the effects of social influence and the factors associated with persuasion, obedience, and conformity and how it contributes to behaviors within society.
    • Analyze and evaluate the building and maintaining of relationships including interpersonal, intimate, sexual, and romantic relationships, and friendships, and the importance of effective communication to overcome the challenges related to relationships as well as maintaining healthy relationships.
    • Identify and describe the types of mental disorders along with the overall development, prevalence, biological factors, and criteria used to diagnose a mental disorder and evaluate the types of therapy associated with psychological disorders and well-being and the effectiveness of each therapy.
    • Identify, explain and apply some empirical research methodologies including the scientific method and the major features of research methods used to study psychology.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/4/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 235 - Relationships and Personal Development


    Description:
    Development of interpersonal relationships from initial encounters to stable commitments. Major focus on interaction patterns in intimate relationships. PSY 235 and FSCF 235 are cross-listed courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand aspects of interpersonal relationships, with some ideas about how to find and to be a life-partner and how to achieve growth and actualization as partners
    • Identify and describe basic concepts and research findings related to self-knowledge and self-esteem, gender roles in society and child-rearing patterns of childhood retained in adulthood and intimate relationships, solitude: knowing yourself, and solitude v. loneliness
    • Identify and describe basic concepts and research findings related to the nature of intimacy, actualization v. neediness in relationships, dangers of intimacy, dysfunctional relationships, finding and promoting healthy intimacy, threats to healthy intimacy, the nature of desire, regulating desire, dysfunctional forms of desire, cultural myths and misunderstandings
    • Reflect upon and express elements of one’s understanding and experiences with relationships, solitude, and knowledge of self

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 242 - Psychology of Video Games


    Description:
    This course outlines many foundational theories of psychology within the lens of video games. Students will examine psychological concepts present in video games and how knowledge of psychology can improve the gaming experience. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Spring).

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K6 - Individual & Society

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine and evaluate the way video games (and gaming broadly) influence how humans feel, think, and behave
    • Apply critical thinking to analyze the role of community, gender, & culture in games
    • Demonstrate how psychological research has contributed to developments in games
    • Recognize the social, political, and ethical implications of advancements in games
    • Formulate questions that can be addressed through scientific solutions
    • Utilize quantitative reasoning and critical thinking skills to understand information sources and address the credibility of such sources

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/21/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 275 - Community Development in Residence Halls


    Description:
    Components of successful student development in residential settings. Educational philosophy of residence halls, community development, and problem solving. Credits do not apply toward psychology degree major or minor. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand the theories and skills necessary to become a successful Resident Assistant (RA) and student leader.
    • Describe and discuss the major student developmental theories.
    • Understand the importance of community and how to create one.
    • Develop and practice communication and confrontation techniques.
    • Understand the importance of programming and how to facilitate a program in their current residence hall.
    • Describe and discuss diversity and multicultural topics.
    • Describe and discuss social issues facing college students today.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 295 - Laboratory Experience in Psychology


    Description:
    Not more than 5 credits of PSY 295, PSY 295C, PSY 495, and PSY 495C combined may be applied to a 45-credit psychology major and not more than 10 credits, combined, may be applied to a 60-credit major. May be repeated up to 10 credits. Grade will either be S or U.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 295C - CHCI Laboratory Experience


    Description:
    Laboratory experience at the Chimpanzee and Human Communication Institute. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U. Course fee will be assessed. Not more than 5 credits of PSY295, PSY 295C, PSY 495, and PSY 495C combined may be applied to a 45-credit psychology major and not more than 10 credits, combined, may be applied to a 60-credit major.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: permission of department chair. PSY 101 is also a recommended prerequisite.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 298 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 299 - Seminar in Psychology


    Credits: (3)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 300 - Research Methods in Psychology


    Description:
    Addresses basic experimental and non-experimental research designs and strategies, as well as the APA-approved professional writing style. Includes both lecture and laboratory experiences. PSY 362 is a recommended co-requisite.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Summarize the steps of the psychological research process
    • Compare scientific and nonscientific approaches to knowledge
    • Describe the process of constructing and testing psychological theory as well as the characteristics of a good theory
    • Describe the characteristics, advantages, and limitations of research methods used in psychological research including correlational and quasi-experimental designs
    • Identify one or more advantages of a complex experimental design
    • Construct a “researchable” question that pertains to your interests
    • Develop a research question into a specific hypothesis that relates two or more operationally defined variables
    • Describe research designs appropriate to a behavioral research question
    • Identify potential threats to internal and external validity in reported behavioral research
    • Use computer databases to generate a list of relevant sources on a topic
    • Identify and address relevant ethical issues in the treatment of human and animal participants in a specific proposed behavioral research project
    • Write professionally using APA style

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/18/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 301 - Learning


    Description:
    Addresses basic theory and research related to classical and operant conditioning, stimulus control, and memory.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 300.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Discuss the historical development of the theoretical orientations to the study of learning.
    • Demonstrate mastery of critical terms and concepts from the field of learning and behavioral psychology.
    • Develop the ability to communicate in the language and format of the disciplines of learning and behavioral psychology.
    • Develop the ability to read, comprehend and discuss technically sophisticated experimental procedures, data analysis methods, theoretical arguments and interpretations specific to behavioral psychology.
    • Demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate research designs, data collection methods and interpretations common to the field of learning and behavioral psychology.
    • Describe the basic behavioral principles of reinforcement, stimulus control, extinction, punishment, and classical conditioning.
    • Identify procedures, methods and techniques developed within the field of learning that have been employed by other disciplines.
    • Discuss the relevance of the theories and findings from the field of learning from an interdisciplinary perspective.
    • Recognize the continuity of species and the relevance of animal models of behavior.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/18/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 303 - Analysis of Everyday Behavior


    Description:
    Environmental, cognitive, and biological influences on behavior in daily life.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Name and describe behavioral tactics for changing behavior (reinforcement, stimulus control, aversive control and its limitations).
    • Develop and implement a behavioral self- management program.
    • Evaluate the effectiveness of your behavior change strategies.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 310 - Multicultural Psychology and Social Justice


    Description:
    An examination of human behavior in cultural context emphasizing the role of culture on thought, behavior, relationships and society. Addresses the influences of identity differences on individuals and society. Examines cross-cultural theory, and methodology. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K2 - Community, Culture, & Citizenship

    General Education Pathways: P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the ways that psychology has perpetuated social injustice.
    • Summarize how privilege, power, and oppression may affect experiences of, and beliefs about prejudice, discrimination, and inequality.
    • Critically examine personal beliefs, experiences and assumptions about culture, cultural difference, and social justice.
    • Articulate how they will become informed citizens through critical analysis of social and cultural influences on the field of psychology.
    • Explain how social, psychological, and culturally diverse experiences enhance both individual life experience and improve the community
    • Analyze how the relationships between local, regional, national, and global cultures impact individuals’ experiences of community, citizenship, politics and mental health/wellbeing.
    • Critically examine  how historical, social, economic, and cultural developments have affected communities, citizenship, politics and government

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/7/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 312 - Queer Theory and Sexuality


    Description:
    This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the academic field of lesbian and gay studies through examination of the history, politics, theories, culture, and community of those who identify as lesbian, bisexual, gay, transgender, and queer.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Trace the history of gay, lesbian, and bisexual culture and articulate their understanding of that history in both written work and class discussion.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the major concepts within queer theory by using some of these concepts to analyze patterns of behavior, outlook, and identity in gay, lesbian, and bisexual communities.
    • Examine how queer self-expression contests and challenges homophobic oppression and heterosexual norms.
    • Analyze the psychological and social tensions that arise from transgressing gender norms.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/15/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 313 - Developmental Psychology


    Description:
    Cognitive, social-emotional, and physical development through the lifespan.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101 or by permission.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate understanding of the basic theories of lifespan development.
    • Demonstrate understanding of the diverse influences on lifespan development, including hereditary, environmental, normative, and non-normative influences.
    • Demonstrate understanding of the physical, cognitive, language, and social/emotional development of individuals throughout the lifespan.
    • Demonstrate the use of research skills, including the University library and/or the Internet.
    • Demonstrate appropriate writing skills, including the correct format for APA references.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/21/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 314 - Human Development and the Learner


    Description:
    Human development from conception through adolescence. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of physical, cognitive, language, moral, and social-emotional development of individuals from conception through adolescence.
    • Apply the key components of prominent developmental theories.
    • Identify the effects of diverse influences on individual development including the impact of a variety of cultural backgrounds.
    • Describe the effects of diverse influences on development, including hereditary, environmental, normative, and non-normative influences.
    • Demonstrate the use of research and writing skills, including the University library and/or the internet as well as using APA style.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/19/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 315 - Psychology in the Schools (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    Psychology applied in school settings including principles of learning, instruction, and behavior management. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe major theories of psychology (behavioral, cognitive, sociocultural, etc.) and how those apply to student learning and behavior in school settings.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of diversity and human development and how these impact student learning and the learning environment in school settings.
    • Describe psychology’s role in the schools in relation to other disciplines or interdisciplinary fields of study, particularly education.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of contemporary educational settings and contemporary issues in educational psychology and to consider those issues from various viewpoints (e.g. teacher, student, parent, and administrator).
    • Demonstrate knowledge of research methods used in school settings, research skills and the ability to apply research to classroom settings.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/31/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 333 - Social Justice: The Psychology of Stereotyping, Prejudice, and Discrimination


    Description:
    Study phenomena and processes associated with one’s beliefs about members of social groups (stereotypes), evaluations of group members (prejudice), and behaviors toward others based on their group membership (discrimination) from a psychological perspective. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Spring).

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K6 - Individual & Society

    General Education Pathways: P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Articulate how approaching the issues of stereotyping, prejudice, and minority experience from a psychological perspective improves our understanding of human behavior.
    • Analyze how theory helps to frame issues associated with stereotypes, prejudice, and minority experience and how research that examines these issues speak to basic psychological theory.
    • Identify and analyze the techniques and findings of psychology relating to stereotyping and prejudice to facilitate the application of psychological research and theory to the solution of real-world problems
    • Evaluate the influence of group-relevant psychological processes on human behavior in the real world.
    • Apply findings and theories to “make sense” of why people do the things they do, and further appreciate the importance of social groups in society.
    • Cultivate theabilities to think critically, to formulate arguments, and to express reasoned ideas

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/4/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 340 - Teaching of Psychology


    Description:
    May be repeated up to 6 credits. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: completion of course in which teaching or assisting is to be done and approval of department chair.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Read and acquire fluent knowledge of basic concepts and skills of the course for which you are assisting the professor.
    • Execute basic tasks of academic instruction, such as finding source material, evaluating exams and papers, leading discussion groups, explaining concepts to students.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
 

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