Jan 29, 2023  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Courses numbered from 101–299 are lower-division courses, primarily for freshmen and sophomores; those numbered from 300–499 are upper-division courses, primarily for juniors and seniors. The numbers 296, 396, 496, and 596 designate individual study courses and are available for registration by prior arrangement with the course instructor and approval of the department chair.

The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the amount of credit each course carries. Variable credit courses include the minimum and maximum number of the credits within parentheses.

Not all of the courses are offered every quarter. Final confirmation of courses to be offered, information on new courses and programs, as well as a list of hours, instructor, titles of courses and places of class meetings, is available online in My CWU which can be accessed through the the CWU home page, and go to www.cwu.edu/registrar/course-information

 

Psychology (PSY)

  
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    PSY 346 - Social Psychology


    Description:
    Social influences on individual behavior.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and describe common research tactics in social psychology, their strengths and weaknesses
    • Identify and describe basic concepts and findings about interpersonal perception, including self-perception, other perception, and stereotypes and prejudice
    • Identify and describe basic concepts and findings about interpersonal influence, including persuasion, conformity, compliance, obedience, and the effects of group membership
    • Identify and describe basic concepts and findings about social relations, including friendship and intimacy, helping behavior, and aggression
    • Identify and describe basic concepts and findings about applied social psychology, including applications to legal practices, business and industry, and health psychology

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 350 - Sleep and Dreaming


    Description:
    Research and theory concerning the functions and dysfunctions of sleep and dreaming.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify methodological issues in the study of sleep and dreaming, including potential problems and biases in these methods.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the measurement of sleep and dreaming including polysomnography and techniques for recording and understanding dreams.
    • Describe and identify disorders of sleep and dreaming, including sleep apnea, limb movement in sleep, narcolepsy, insomnias, and parasomnias.
    • Discuss and identify behavioral, cognitive and pharmacological interventions for sleep disorders.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of circadian rhythms and the biology underlying sleep and dreaming.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/16/2008

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 352 - Application of Adult Development Theories (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    This course is designed to provide students with a broad understanding and application of theories on adult development and aging. Service-learning is integral and students will be involved with older adults though cooperating local agencies. May be repeated up to 4 credits. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply theories of adult development in interactions with older adults.
    • Apply concepts and theories of Personal meaning and purpose.
    • Demonstrate sensitivity to multicultural perspectives and theories.
    • Demonstrate adequate legal/ethical/safety considerations.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 362 - Introductory Statistics


    Description:
    Descriptive statistics and introduction to inferential statistics through one-way analysis of variance. Prior coursework in finite math is recommended.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: math placement test score resulting in placement into Math 100C or successful completion of Math 100B with a grade of C or higher.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: FYE3 - Quantitative Reasoning

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate proficiency at using basic algebra to calculate descriptive statistics, such as means and standard deviations, and use formulas provided to calculate inferential statistical tests
    • Calculate simple and compound probabilities, and use sampling distributions to assign probabilities to sample data
    • Use the steps of null hypothesis testing to determine whether differences in sample data are best interpreted to be due to chance, or to systematic effects
    • Understand the relationship between the variability in sample data and the decisions of null hypothesis testing
    • Correctly choose inferential and descriptive statistics that are appropriate to different types of data

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/6/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg, Online Winter Locations: Ellensburg, Online Spring Locations: Ellensburg, Online Summer Locations: Online
  
  •  

    PSY 363 - Intermediate Statistics and Research Methods


    Description:
    Experience with the design, execution, analysis, interpretation, and communication of psychological experiments in addition to data management and statistical software skills. Four hours lecture and two hours lab each week.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 300 and PSY 362.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate understanding of the theoretical basis of parametric statistics and when it is appropriate to use them
    • Demonstrate understanding of the relationship between random sampling distributions and statistical decision making
    • Demonstrate understanding the concepts of multivariate statistics including multiple regression and MANOVA
    • Choose and calculate an appropriate ANOVA for commonly used experimental designs in the social sciences, including between-, within- and mixed factorial ANOVAs
    • Calculate and interpret simple main effects for an interaction
    • Read and accurately summarize the general scientific literature on a testable research hypothesis in psychology
    • Select and apply appropriate methods to maximize internal and external validity, reduce the plausibility of alternative explanations, and plan for an appropriate statistical analysis
    • Collect, analyze, interpret, and report data using appropriate statistical strategies in APA style, including graphic representations of data
    • Use appropriate software to produce understandable statistical and qualitative analyses
    • Follow the APA Code of Ethics in the treatment of human and nonhuman participants in the design, data collection, interpretation, and reporting of psychological research
    • Exhibit the ability to collaborate effectively

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/18/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  
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    PSY 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 401 - Psychology of Sport


    Description:
    Current theory and research on sports psychology; application of psychological interventions in sports and fitness.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and describe introductory terms and concepts in sport psychology, including the history of sports, basic principles of scientific psychology, and the history of sport psychology.
    • Identify and describe various psychological factors in sport, including psychobiological factors, motivation, attention and memory, mood, and arousal and stress.
    • Identify and describe common applications of sport psychology interventions, including relaxation, “psyching-up,” and imagery.
    • Identify and describe the influence of social factors on sport performance, including aggression and violence, crowd effects, and team cohesiveness.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 413 - Conservation Psychology


    Description:
    Interaction between thought processes, behavior, and environmental decision-making as they relate to environmental change and sustainability. PSY 413 and PSY 513 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of basic facts, principles, and applications related to understanding the reciprocal influence of humans and their environments
    • Identify and review both scholarly and popular literature related to the origins of environmental problems and identify behavioral components of these problems 
    • Compare your attitudes and behavior with those necessary for sustaining the global ecosystem and identify strategies for changing your behavior where necessary to maintain the sustainability of our ecosystem 
    • PSY 515: Summarize and evaluate research focused on one aspect of sustainability

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    PSY 415 - Behavioral Medicine and Health Psychology


    Description:
    The application of psychology to the understanding of illness and to its prevention and treatment with special emphasis on current health topics (e.g., stress, HIV/AIDS). PSY 415 and PSY 515 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both. Formerly, PSY 455; students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify major psychological, social, and cultural influences on the development of health-related behaviors and attitudes
    • Describe major psychological theories concerning health-promoting behavior
    • Describe major psychological approaches to modifying health-related attitudes and behaviors
    • Identify common obstacles to, and facilitators, of treatment adherence
    • Describe the application of two or more psychological theories to the development of education, prevention, and intervention programs addressing current health topics (e.g., addictions, stress, eating disorders, HIV/AIDS)
    • Identify procedures for evaluating behavioral medicine interventions and health promotion programs
    • Demonstrate the ability to reflect upon the application of psychological theory and research to their own health behaviors and attitudes
    • Design a prevention or intervention program targeted at increasing health-promoting behaviors or decreasing health-compromising behaviors
    • Articulate the roles and contributions of behavioral specialists (e.g., mental health counselors, psychologists) in the primary health care setting

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/3/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 420 - Psychology of Language


    Description:
    Basic principles of language, cognition of language, language development, theories of linguistic structure and brain function as it relates to language processing. PSY 420 and PSY 520 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.  Formerly PSY 373, students may not receive credit for both.  Formerly PSY 473, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define language and distinguish a language from a means of communication. Discuss language relevant phenomena like humor, taboo language & non-verbal communication
    • Discuss positions on the relationship between language and thought. Describe theoretical issues involved in understanding and remembering discourse
    • Distinguish kinds of memory and some aspects of their use in language processing
    • Define and discuss basic issues in speech perception and auditory recognition of words
    • Discuss issues of visual recognition of words and describe theoretical issues involved in sentence processing
    • Describe the principal issues surrounding language acquisition, and how language acquisition is affected by various cognitive or sensory deficits
    • Discuss some major findings on the relationship between the brain and language
    • Define and discuss various research methodologies used in the psychology of language

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/3/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 421 - Human Neuroanatomy


    Description:
    An introduction to the anatomical organization and basic functional/clinical principles of the major systems of the human brain and their relations to disease and behavior. PSY 421 and PSY 521 are equivalent courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the historical development of neuroscience as a cross-disciplinary science.
    • Describe and analyze the contributions of anatomical, physiological, behavioral, pharmacological, developmental, and cell and molecular biological studies to the bases of neuroscience.
    • Integrate pathological findings from psychology, psychiatry, physiology, and clinical neurology with basic scientific work in the neurosciences.
    • Identify and explain why research questions rather than methods ideally drive advances in neuroscience.
    • Identify appropriate applications of neuroscientific knowledge in health, service, education, or business professions.
    • Use critical thinking to analyze and critique the literature and compare textbook, popular and peer-reviewed scholarly reports in the neurosciences.
    • Demonstrate appropriate use anatomical terminology and locate and identify major brain structures on brain atlas plates, MRI, CAT, and PET scans.
    • Describe neural mechanisms of motor control, sensory processing, homeostatic maintenance, neuromodulation and higher cognitive functions (e.g. learning, memory and emotions).

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 430 - Positive Psychology


    Description:
    Examination of the theoretical and empirical literature in the field of positive psychology with attention to topics such as happiness, mindfulness, optimism, gratitude, and forgiveness. PSY 430 and PSY 530 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Justify the legitimacy of positive psychology as an important area of study
    • Demonstrate knowledge of major theories and empirical findings in the field of positive psychology
    • Summarize methodological challenges associated with areas of research in positive psychology
    • Demonstrate the ability to apply important information about one or more specific topics in positive psychology to the student’s personal or professional experiences

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/19/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 438 - Substance Abuse and Dependence


    Description:
    Overview of substance abuse from psychological and systems perspectives. Models of addiction and problematic use are explored. Issues including dual diagnosis, family system and cultural considerations, and theories of intervention and treatment are discussed.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the incidence and prevalence substance abuse and dependence among diverse groups in the United States.
    • Identify behavioral and affective symptoms associated with the use of stimulants, sedatives, hypnotics, inhalants, narcotics, hallucinogens, steroids, and psychotropic medicines.
    • Explain and critique the major theories about the etiology of substance abuse and dependence
    • Examine family, sociological, and cultural factors associated with substance abuse and dependence
    • Analyze the potential strengths and limitations of different approaches to defining and assessing substance abuse and dependence as well as “codependency.”
    • List and explain hypothesized effects of the chemically dependent family system on the behavior and emotional experience of individual family members. 
    • Describe major concepts in the family systems view of substance abuse and dependence.
    • Describe the relative advantages and disadvantages of providing chemical dependency treatment within the context of the family system. 
    • Apply concepts of relapse prevention and harm reduction to their own experiences with health behavior change. 
    • Compare and contrast current models of assessment, intervention and treatment for substance abuse and dependence 
    • Analyze their own preconceived ideas or biases as well as their current beliefs about the assessment and treatment of substance dependence.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Online Summer Locations: Online
  
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    PSY 441 - Self-Injurious Behavior


    Description:
    This course covers the occurrence, prevalence, etiology, and treatment of self-injurious behavior in human and nonhuman primates. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: any biology or psychology course and junior standing or above.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Distinguish between established categories of self-injurious behavior (SIB), including stereotypic SIB, major SIB, compulsive SIB, and impulsive SIB;
    • Identify disorders in which SIB is commonly found, and explain the circumstances under which self-injurious behavior is commonly elicited;
    • Critically evaluate the literature pertaining to the etiology and treatment of SIB, both from human clinical reports and comparative nonhuman data; and
    • Critically evaluate popular portrayals of SIB.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/4/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 442 - Evolutionary Psychology


    Description:
    Application of principles of evolution to understanding of human and non-human behavior and cognition. PSY 442 and PSY 542 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate understanding of the principles of evolution by natural selection.
    • Apply the principles of evolution by natural selection to the traditional psychological topics of human and nonhuman behavior and cognition.
    • Think critically about evolutionary theory and the evolution of behavior and the mind.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/9/2003

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 444 - Data Visualization and Presentation


    Description:
    Basic data graphing and presentation skills useful in a wide variety of careers; covers different types of tables, graphs and charts via data graphing software, and suiting the graph type to the audience/presentation type.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate and diagram the differences between a graph and a table
    • Explain and analyze the six key elements of graph construction
    • Identify, demonstrate, and summarize the differences between the five categories of graphs
    • Differentiate and generate commands related to data extraction in Excel
    • Identify and distinguish between graph creation techniques in both Excel and Power Point
    • Summarize and discriminate between the purpose of graphs in each of the five categories
    • Integrate graphs into both presentation and report formats

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/2/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Online
  
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    PSY 445 - Clinical, Counseling, and Community Psychology


    Description:
    History, current trends, fields of employment, professional ethics, methods of psychological diagnosis, and treatment.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the historical development and foci of clinical, counseling, and community psychology.
    • Describe the role and techniques of assessment, interviewing, and treatment in each field.
    • Describe basic skills and approaches to intervention with various populations.
    • Describe and evaluate professional, ethical and legal issues related to each profession.
    • Identify the contributions of theory and empirical research for each profession.
    • Identify and understand the implications of strengths and weaknesses in behavioral and social science research.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/18/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 447 - Psychology of Adolescence


    Description:
    Physiological, cognitive, and social aspects of maturation; problems of vocational choice and of increasing autonomy.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand adolescent development, relationships, and culture in a social/ethnic context along with the revolutionary changes in society and how they affect the lives of adolescents.
    • Understand and articulate the sexual, physical, intellectual and body image changes that adolescents undergo.
    • Understand and critically discuss the changes that adolescent’s undergo concerning self-concept, identity, ethnicity, and gender.
    • Understand and critically evaluate the social development of adolescents including adolescent society, culture, relationships, morality, values, beliefs, and behavior.
    • Articulate and evaluate the changing world of adolescents and their families.
    • Recognize and evaluate the educational and vocational developments and choices that are available to adolescents today.
    • Evaluate and articulate the psychosocial problems of adolescents including alienation, substance abuse, addiction, and dependency.
    • Develop an appreciation for the varied and extensive sources of information/research that encompass topics that adolescent psychologists explore.
    • Understand and assess the various techniques and tools that are available to adolescent psychologists within each the venues that they may be working.
    • Learn about and critically evaluate the development of moral judgment character, values, beliefs, and behavior of adolescents.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/18/2006

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 448 - Sexual Behavior


    Description:
    The scientific study of the learned and innate bases of sexual behavior in humans and lower animals.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the principles natural and sexual selection, and how these relate to sexual behavior
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the genetic and hormonal influences on sexual behavior, and how these interact with cultural factors
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the methods used by sexuality researchers (for both human and nonhuman subjects), and potential problems and biases in these methods
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the factors influencing cultural variability in sexual practices and attitudes

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 449 - Abnormal Psychology


    Description:
    Symptoms, etiology, and treatment of psychopathology and behavior problems.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand and describe the historical views of abnormal behavior that influence how mental illness is viewed today
    • Describe the typical research methods and research controversies regarding abnormal behavior
    • Describe the major diagnostic categories of the DSM-IV and distinguish among symptoms, proposed causes, and preferred treatments of each
    • Summarize the basic psychological theories of abnormal behavior and the treatments that correspond to each theoretical perspective
    • Describe legal and ethical issues related to abnormal psychology
    • Consider and express one’s own values, experiences, and history related to theory, research, and practice in abnormal psychology

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 450 - Sensation and Perception


    Description:
    Research, theoretical models of sensory and perceptual processes. Prior coursework in cell function recommended.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PSY 300.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the classical psychophysical methods and signal detection theory and methods.
    • Describe the basic anatomy and physiology of the sensory systems, with particular emphasis on vision and hearing; and, to a lesser extent, the chemical senses, olfaction, and gustation.
    • Describe how objects in the environment are represented in neurological patterns of visual-system activation, with emphasis on retinal ganglion cells and lateral inhibition, the visual pathway, and the architecture of vision in the cortex.
    • Describe the variables that are important in color vision, light and dark adaptation, depth perception, the perception of form and movement, and the perceptual constancies.
    • Describe the structure and function of the auditory system.
    • Describe the variables that are important in the perception of loudness and aural space and speech perception.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/16/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 452 - Adult Development and Aging


    Description:
    Principles of adult psychological development and the aging process. Examination of adult behavior, life-styles, crises in adult development, and cognitive, personality, and intellectual changes with aging.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and describe and apply major psychological theories about adult change or development.
    • Identify, describe, and define the research methodology frequently used by psychologists in the study of adult aging and development.
    • Observe, identify, and describe the physical and health changes that occur in adult aging.
    • Identify and describe the intellectual changes that occur during adulthood.
    • Assess, identify, and describe the social and work roles in adulthood and the development of relationships.
    • Summarize the particular issues faced in adulthood such as the search for meaning, stresses, and transitions associated with late adulthood.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 453 - Theories of Personality


    Description:
    Focus on the scientific study of how and why people differ from each other. Personality psychology addresses questions regarding shared human nature, dimensions of individual differences, and unique patterns of individual behavior.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the concepts and processes of historically significant theories of personality.
    • Assess the strengths and weaknesses of each major personality theory.
    • Describe and define the research methodology frequently used by psychologists in the study of personality.
    • Identify the contributions of theory and empirical research to our contemporary understanding of personality.
    • Utilize theory and research in personality in understanding the student’s own life.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/20/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 454 - The Helping Interview


    Description:
    Theory and practice of supportive interviewing skills.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify some of your personal qualities that may support or hinder attempts at being helpful to others
    • Describe a framework for conceptualizing the helping interview
    • Describe key concepts and theory related to helping relationships in a multicultural society
    • Explain major ethical and legal principles governing professional helping relationships
    • Describe methods for organizing well-formed helping interviews
    • Identify skills and strategies for promoting client change
    • Describe factors that influence interviewer’s and client’s decisions about the structure, purpose, and goals of the helping interview
    • Demonstrate basic helping skills such as attending, paraphrasing, summarizing, reflection of feelings, challenging, and focusing
    • Describe your personal style and assumptions about the helping process

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 456 - Industrial and Organizational Psychology


    Description:
    Application of psychological principles to personnel and organizational problems in labor, industry, government, education, and the military.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe what I/0 psychologists do
    • Apply I/0 research methods to practical problems
    • Explain how psychological measurements are used in the workplace
    • Describe how I/0 psychology relates to the human resources function
    • Explain the importance of facilitation, team building and teamwork in the workplace
    • Describe the various leadership styles and the characteristics of good leadership

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/22/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 460 - Cognitive Psychology


    Description:
    Methods and theories of human cognition and information processing.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 300.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Appropriately use terminology.
    • Describe the history.
    • Appropriately use the methods, theories, and research findings of cognitive psychology.
      • Concepts and research areas may include: Diversity as it relates to cognitive psychology, Reductionism and how a science of mind is possible, Brain structures related to cognitive processing, The information processing model, including attention, perception, encoding, storage, and retrieval, Parallel distributed processing, Memory constructs, Knowledge representation processes, Language, Biases in thinking, Cognitive assumptions, Perceptual organization, Problem solving, Cognitive development, Sensory analysis, and Learning.
    • Perform the skills of synthesizing, organizing, and analyzing the literature in a research topic, conducting a research experiment in cognitive psychology, and reporting research in APA style.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/2007

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 461 - History and Systems of Psychology (Put on reserve 9/16/19)


    Description:
    Historical development and persistent theoretical problems of contemporary psychology. (Put on reserve 9/16/19, will go inactive 8/24/22)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe major problematic themes of systems of psychology and describe where a given system stands on these dimensions: conscious mentalism-unconscious mentalism, behaviorism-mentalism, determinism-indeterminism, empiricism-rationalism, functionalism-structuralism, mechanism-vitalism, molecularism-molarism, monism-dualism, naturalism-supernaturalism, nomotheticism-idiographicism, and staticism-dynamicism
    • Describe common problems in historiography
    • Compare at least four views of how science makes progress
    • Describe the major figures and contributions to the history of modem psychology made by: Early Greek philosophy, cosmology and idealism, Post-Aristotelian worldly philosophy, The Renaissance and the beginnings of modem science and natural philosophy, Empiricists, sensationalists and positivists
    • Describe the major figures and contributions to the history of modem psychology made by: Rationalists, Romantics and existentialists, Early Experimental psychologists, Voluntarists, structuralists, other early psychologists, and the Darwinian influence and the testing movement
    • Describe the major figures and contributors to the history of modem psychology made by 20th century developments in Functionalism, Behaviorism, Neobehaviorism, and Gestalt Psychology
    • Describe the major figures and contributions to the history of modem psychology made by: Pioneers in early diagnosis, explanation, and treatment of mental illness Freud, psychoanalysis and its early alternatives, Humanistic (third force) psychology, Cognitive psychologists, Psycho biologists, and Contemporary professional psychologists
    • Use scholarly resources in the library and internet to write a coherent brief history of a selected event in the history of psychology in proper APA style

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/18/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    PSY 465 - Psychology and the Law


    Description:
    How the discipline of psychology contributes to our understanding of matters related to the law.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understanding the psychologist’s approach to the law and the dilemmas reflected in this approach along with understanding the roles that psychologists may play in the legal system.
    • Understand and articulate how psychologists balance legality versus morality versus justice.
    • Learn about the various ways that psychologists help with the selection and training of police. This includes understanding the personality characteristics of police and their relationship to the community.
    • Understand and evaluate the psychological aspects of witnesses, suspects, and victims.
    • Develop an understanding of and appreciation for forensic psychological assessment.
    • Learn about the trial process and develop and appreciation for the special concerns involved with jury trials.
    • Understand and assess the psychological components of punishment and sentencing
    • Develop an appreciation for the varied and extensive sources of information/research that encompass topics that psychologists explore.
    • Understand and assess the various techniques and tools that are available to psychologists within each the legal venues that they may be working.
    • Learn about and critically evaluate how changing social value impact the tasks of psychologists within the legal arena.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/2/2006

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 467 - Child Psychopathology


    Description:
    Identification and treatment of the child with psychological disturbances; the home, school, community, and cultural context in relation to the child’s mental health; relevant resources and research. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, and Summer).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PSY 313 or PSY 314.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Use terminology, concepts, models, and theories to explain behavior and mental processes in children and adolescents
    • Identify major historical events, theoretical perspectives, and figures in child and adolescent psychology
    • Identify and describe biological, familial, social, and cultural factors related to the development, diagnosis, outcome and treatment of relevant conditions
    • Examine classification and assessment techniques used in child and adolescent psychopathology
    • Evaluate empirical literature regarding taxonomy, etiology and effective treatments for childhood disorders
    • Use the DSM-V to compare and contrast specific disorders found in children and adolescents
    • Explain how individual and sociocultural differences may influence the diagnostic process and the applicability/generalizability of research findings
    • Discuss relevant ethical issues in the treatment and study of child and adolescent psychopathology
    • Describe how issues of global concern (e.g., poverty, physical health, migration, rights of children, conflict and violence) impact child and adolescent psychopathology

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 476 - Psychopharmacology


    Description:
    Common drugs, psychotherapeutic agents and hallucinogens. Behavioral effects and physiological mechanisms.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define, identify, and explain the basic principles of pharmacokinetics .and pharmacodynamics
    • Define, identify, and explain nervous system organization and function, and chemical signaling
    • Define, identify, and explain the methods used to study drug action
    • Define, identify, and explain the organization and function of the major neurotransmitter systems
    • Define, identify, and explain the mechanisms of drug dependence and addiction
    • Define, identify, and explain how the foregoing concepts and principles apply to a selected set of psychoactive drugs

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/26/2009

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 478 - Behavioral Neuroscience


    Description:
    Problems, methods, and techniques of neurophysiology and the physiology of human and infrahuman behavior patterns. Prior coursework in cell function recommended.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PSY 300.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe different theories that relate the brain to human behavior.
    • Cite the contributions of historical figures or case-studies.
    • Explain the evolutionary history of the human brain.
    • Identify basic structural features of the brain and describe the function of each.
    • Explain conventional methods for studying the structures and functions of the nervous system.
    • Describe the structural anatomy of the neuron and function of each feature.
    • Describe the process of synaptic transmission, including the effects of drugs and hormones.
    • Describe the behavioral effects of the factors affecting synaptic transmission, including developmental phenomena, critical periods, abnormality, learning, and memory.
    • Using the visual system as a model, explain the physiological processes of human sensation and perception.
    • Explain how a combination of basic structures and functions give rise to human emotion.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/16/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 479 - Comparative Psychology (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    Seminar in the study of behavior and cognition across species. This course is listed under the graduate version of PSY 576; students may not receive credit for both. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the historical and theoretical roots of comparative psychology.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the methods used in comparative psychology.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of differing perspectives within comparative psychology, and how these influence and are influenced by choice of species.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of major topic areas with comparative psychology, including their historical roots and theoretical bases.
    • Demonstrate detailed knowledge of a specific area within comparative psychology, including its historical roots and the current state of the field.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/31/2007

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 483 - Psychology of Gender


    Description:
    The psychology of gender from a social psychological perspective, which examines implications of gender roles, schemas, and stereotypes.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe basic concepts and findings in the psychology of gender, including: historical development of the field, including important contributions from the literature on the psychology of women, contemporary issues (e.g., the psychology of men and masculinity), and biological, social, psychological, cultural, and political influences related to gender and gender identity development.
    • Identify context-related gender differences (e.g., education, career, health care, social networks).
    • Critically deconstruct gender messages in contemporary society.
    • Distinguish between gender differences and gender stereotypes.
    • Use research resources to support class-related written assignments.
    • Discuss theory and research on the psychology of gender.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/5/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 484 - Violence and Aggression


    Description:
    Violence and aggression directed toward self, others, and society. Problems of prevention and treatment, related ethical and legal issues.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand and analyze the lifetime of developmental processes involved in violence and aggression.
    • Develop an understanding for the multi-disciplinary model that incorporates the biological, psychological, political, social and environmental contributors to violent and aggressive behavior.
    • Analyze and appreciate how mental illness may or may not be a contributing factor to violence and aggression.
    • Understand and critically evaluate how the justice system, imprisonment, other forms of punishment, and the victims’ rights movement affect violent and aggressive behaviors.
    • Analyze how the justice system, imprisonment, other forms of punishment, and the victims’ rights movement affect individual victims and society as a whole.
    • Learn to articulate the inter-connected risk factors for violent and aggressive behavior.
    • Learn about the successful and unsuccessful violence prevention programs while also integrating the obstacles to prevention into a coherent framework for future prevention programs.
    • Develop an appreciation for the varied and extensive sources of information/research that encompass topics that psychologists explore.
    • Understand and assess the various techniques and tools that are available to psychologists within each the venues that they may be working.
    • Learn about and critically evaluate how changing social values impact the tasks of psychologists.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/2/2006

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 489 - Senior Assessment


    Description:
    An end-of-major course. Portfolio review, career planning, and program evaluation activities. Grade will either be S or U. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PSY 200 and admitted to a psychology major and senior standing. It is recommended that this class is taken in the last academic quarter.

    Credits: (2)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate clear communication strategies and techniques oral, written, or expressive from in preparation for graduate school or career.
    • Apply higher-order critical thinking to evaluate growth as a psychology student.
    • Reflect and  integrate, and apply skills and knowledge learned as a psychology major
    • Create a portfolio synthesizing your work as a psychology student.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of psychological principles
    • Engage with and serve community as scholar-citizens

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/16/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  
    Learning Agreement Forms

    PSY 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized, contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: prior approval required.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 491 - Workshop


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 495 - Directed Research


    Description:
    Not more than 5 credits of PSY 295, PSY295C, PSY 495, and PSY495C combined may be applied to a 45-credit psychology major and not more than 10 credits, combined, may be applied to a 60-credit major. By permission. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 495C - CHCI-directed Research


    Description:
    Directed research at the Chimpanzee and Human Communication Institute. Course fee will be assessed. Not more than 5 credits of PSY 295, PSY 295C, PSY 495, and PSY 495C combined may be applied to a 45-credit psychology major, and not more than 10 hours combined may be applied to a 60-credit major. May be repeated up to 10 credits. Grade will either be S or U.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  
  •  

    PSY 497 - Undergraduate Honors Thesis


    Description:
    By invitation of department chair. Research supervised by three-member committee of the department of psychology. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Departmental Honors Program.

    Credits: (2-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 498 - Special Topic


    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PSY 499 - Seminar


    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Public Health (PUBH)

  
  •  

    PUBH 209 - Consumer Health


    Description:

    This course explores issues related to information, products, services, and regulation influencing the health of people as consumers. Emphases are information environment and perspectives of both consumers and health professionals. Formerly HED 209, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Spring).

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K6 - Individual & Society

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being, P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the ways regulation, systems, and resulting product/services options are related to consumer values and decisions;
    • Find and use credible information about health-related services & products, policy, and/or decision making;
    • Collect and share qualitative and/or descriptive-level quantitative data regarding consumer health
    • Outline key societal decisions, knowledge building, and events shaping contemporary consumer health issues and options;
    • Analyze constructs of behavioral and other public health-relevant theory with respect to impact on consumer outcomes 

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/1/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 230 - Foundations of Public and Community Health


    Description:
    This is an introductory course for students interested in public and community. The course introduces students to the core foundational concepts for continuing study in the areas of public and community health. This course surveys the history, philosophies, and underlying the practice of public health. This course involves community and campus interaction through service learning. Formerly HED 230, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize, describe, and discuss the history, philosophy, and foundational concepts the field of public health.
    • Define and explain the 3 core functions and 10 essential services of public health. 
    • Differentiate among the roles that federal, state and county governments play in the control of community and public health activities
    • Describe the top causes of morbidity and mortality in terms of incidence and prevalence, risk and protective factors, and mechanism for prevention and intervention.
    • Identify the role of public health in addressing the needs of vulnerable communities and populations.
    • Define social determinants of health and articulate their impact on individual and community level health
    • Use health data to identify disparities in health status and outcomes on a population level
    • Reflect on how their field experience connect to the 3 core functions and 10 essential services of Public Health

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/12/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 240 - Writing in the Health Sciences


    Description:
    Fundamental skills and practice for effective written communication in the health sciences; attention to clarity and accuracy; various styles and strategies; appropriate use and citation of peer-reviewed literature; audience concern; hierarchy of evidence; APA style is a focus. Formerly HED 240, students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: Academic Writing I.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify, critique, and synthesize credible sources of appropriate scholarly evidence related to population health issues and strategies.
    • Produce a literature review and a proposal regarding a public health issue or strategy.
    • Organize research to develop an evidence-based argument on a public health issue or strategy, with the aim of proposing a health promotion initiatives and future research.
    • Substantiate assertions with appropriate scholarly evidence using American Psychological Association (APA) Style.
    • Identify weaknesses in argument clarity and inappropriate writing style for the intended audience to strengthen prose through iterative revisions.
    • Produce writing appropriate for a general public audience, designed to communicate information about an issue and/or prevention strategy.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/9/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 250 - Introduction to Health Policy and Systems


    Description:
    This introductory course provides an overview of the U.S. health system, and explores the conceptual process of health policy development, the social and political environment in which policy decisions are made and their implications on the health and well-being of populations. Formerly HED 250, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the basic structure of the U.S. health system and its major components
    • Identify the basic lawmaking and policymaking processes in health and related domains
    • Conduct basic policy analyses related to public health policy decisions and interventions
    • Summarize major health policy decisions in U.S. history and their impact on current population health
    • Articulate basic policy positions that reflect public health decisions

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/5/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Online Summer Locations: Online
  
  •  

    PUBH 298 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated up to 12 credits.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 310 - Community Health


    Description:
    An overview of contemporary community health programs; problems in community health at the local, national, and international levels. Formerly HED 310, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Winter, Summer).

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe various determinants of health at a community level
    • Differentiate among the roles that federal, state and county governments play in the control of community health activities
    • Identify risk factors and protective factors at play for various community health problems
    • Describe socio-economic, racial/ethnic, linguistic and other related health disparities
    • Examine the primary differences between non-communicable and communicable diseases and how these conditions impact the health of a community
    • Appraise possible community-based interventions designed to address a variety of community health problems

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 311 - Cross Cultural Practices for Health and Medicine


    Description:
    Course examines beliefs, values, biases, and other culturally-driven variables affecting, and reflecting, societal health status and outcomes. Students will consider issues and strategies, and learn to connect with people and systems, in new ways. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Spring).

     

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K2 - Community, Culture, & Citizenship

    General Education Pathways: P1 Civic & Community Engagement, P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize the breadth and impact of cultures and cultural definitions as related to health status and outcomes.
    • Demonstrate self-awareness about culturally-driven beliefs, values, norms, and biases in personal models of desirable health, medical, and related social outcomes.
    • Identify changeable health and social outcomes impacted by the ways culture has been inadequately considered as part of community health and medical care strategies.
    • Describe the role of beliefs, values, norms, and other cultural nuances as levers to improve health outcomes for individuals and communities.
    • Explain a positive health status or outcome experienced by a group, community, or society as a function of its social, psychological, and/or culturally diverse experiences. 
    • Analyze a community’s health-relevant decisions, policies, or status as related to local, national, regional, and/or global cultures.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/4/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
  •  

    PUBH 317 - Global Health Issues and Solutions


    Description:
    Course examines health and social issues as a function of setting in the global community. Explores differences in experiences, resource bases, strategies, and outcomes. Introduces global policy, major initiatives, and alternative approaches and opportunities. Formerly HED 317, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Spring).

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K4 - Global Dynamics

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being, P3 Perspectives on Current Issues

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define and use key terms relevant for global health issues analysis and improvement
    • Discuss disparities of resource base that initiate and maintain health and social Inequities
    • Research and share case- based strategies that support effective change in global health outcomes
    • Use concepts, theories, and skills from relevant disciplines for global health improvement
    • Find and use credible sources relevant for understanding and solving global health issues

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/4/2018

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 318 - The Politics of Food and Health


    Description:
    Exploration of the politics of food from farm to table, and the implications for human and environmental health. PUBH 318 and NUTR 318 are cross-listed courses; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze changes in U.S. diet over time.
    • Question food systems, choices, and discourse relative to personal and population health.
    • Identify influential factors in the food environment relative to power.
    • Evaluate regulatory influence on food production, manufacturing, and distribution and the potential effects on human and environmental health.
    • Frame a food system issue, from a population health standpoint, for discussion.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 320 - Environmental Health


    Description:
    Examines environments, agents, and outcomes related to human and ecosystem health. Explores basic toxicology and environmental epidemiology principles; behavioral, social, economic, and political factors; scientific and technological advances; and sustainability issues and strategies. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

     

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K8 - Science & Technology

    General Education Pathways: P5 Sustainability

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe scientific/ technological developments, and societal perspectives about them, with respect to human and ecosystem outcomes.
    • Recognize social, political, economic, and ethical contributors to, and implications of, environmental issues.
    • Analyze environmental challenges that threaten human and natural environment health.
    • Calculate environmental epidemiology rates and other statistics.
    • Describe historical and theoretical/scientific foundations of strategies, specific sub-areas, and epidemiology related to environmental health.
    • Describe and differentiate between sustainability efforts, environmental justice issues and strategies, and governmental public health strategies as related to human and ecosystem outcomes.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
  •  

    PUBH 324 - Infectious and Non-infectious Disease


    Description:
    This course introduces students to the various principles related to the identification, treatment, and prevention of prevalent infectious and non-infectious diseases. Additionally, the physical, social, psychological, and economic effects of these illnesses/diseases in society are explored. Formerly HED 324, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the disease process for chronic illnesses such as cancer, cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, sensory, nervous, and endocrine disease.
    • Identify risk factors related to the development of non­infectious diseases.
    • Identify primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of care for non-infectious diseases.
    • Communicate and advocate for preventive health education in regard non-infectious disease.
    • Provide information and act as a health education resource.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/4/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 351 - Community Building Strategies for Public Health


    Description:
    Introduces students to practical strategies designed to engage others in creating change that matters to them. Explores ideas, evidence, examples, and possibilities from the activist to the establishment. Course offers community practice opportunities. Formerly HED 351 and HED 450, students may only receive credit for one. Course will be offered every year (Winter).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PUBH 230.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K2 - Community, Culture, & Citizenship

    General Education Pathways: P1 Civic & Community Engagement

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the ways in which community organizing has been and can potentially be used to improve community outcomes
    • Discuss challenges faced by practitioners using community building strategies
    • Share evidence related to advocacy and similar strategies as effective in improving outcomes
    • Present an outline for community building strategies for making personally meaningful community change
    • Design a plan, and tools for advocacy around a specific issue
    • Engage with a personally accessible community opportunity for action

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/4/2018

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 370 - Contemporary Issues in Public Health


    Description:
    Contemporary health education topics and issues are explored through classroom and community contacts, visual, web-based, and interactive media.  May be repeated for up to 8 credits, provided topic is different. Formerly HED 370, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Distinguish credible information from unreliable information pertaining to issue areas.
    • Research the evidence base surrounding a particular issue area (such as mental health, reproductive health, HIV/AIDS, food justice, or global human rights).
    • Discuss norms, values, beliefs, and attitudes related to the issue area, as well as the impact of such thinking on current approaches and outcomes.
    • Synthesize, and share credible information surrounding the issue area, with attention to meeting the needs of various audiences of interest.
    • Propose feasible strategies to improve population outcomes surrounding the issue area.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 375 - Theories of Health Behavior


    Description:
    Provides an introduction to methods and theories of behavior change related to community and public health. Examines change process of individual and communities including motivating factors essential to maintaining positive behavior change. Formerly HED 375, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PUBH 230 and PUBH 240 or by instructor permission.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define what theory is and identify key types of social and behavioral science theory that are relevant to public health interventions. 
    • Describe the key constructs of four theories that are often used in public health interventions: the Health Belief Model, The Transtheoretical Model and Stages of Change, Social Cognitive Theory, and the Social Ecological Mo.
    • Evaluate the evidence about the relative effectiveness of theory-based interventions.
    • Identify the most important considerations in choosing the right theory to address a health behavior problem in a particular population and context.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/12/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 376 - Community Food Strategies: Campus Garden


    Description:
    Project-centered course designed to introduce students to skills and strategies relevant for developing and sustaining campus-based community food strategies to improve health and social outcomes. May be repeated up to 12 credits. Course will be offered every year (Spring, Summer).

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Share information about contemporary community food systems issues and strategies designed to solve them.
    • Assess current, and potential, opportunities for feasible campus garden-based food and health promotion strategies.
    • Engage potential partners.
    • Collaborate with a team to contribute to a campus garden-based community food project. 
    • Share the story of the project.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/5/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 380 - Epidemiology


    Description:
    Epidemiology is the scientific study of the determinants, rates, and distribution of disease amongst populations. Formerly HED 380, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Winter, Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PUBH 230 and PUBH 240 or by instructor permission.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the history, philosophy, and uses for epidemiology.
    • Compute rates, distributions, and risk of morbidity and mortality.
    • Explain the ethical principles of research are important to epidemiological design and public health. 
    • Identify basic epidemiological study designs and apply examples of appropriate use.
    • Assess the use of epidemiological evidence in determining contributory and casual relationships between variables.
    • Understand the broad application of epidemiology to the field of clinical health, public health practice, and public policy.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/12/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 398 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated up to 12 credits.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 409 - Community Mental Health Issues and Strategies (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    This course provides an overview of the history, trends, and promising models of community-based mental health from a public health perspective. This includes the broad range of determinants of mental health and substance abuse, U.S. delivery system and supports, program and policy interventions, and other mental health promotion efforts from a community-based context. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PUBH 230.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe a variety of community mental health program delivery models currently being used in the US
    • Examine determinants of mental health as they relate to community-based factors
    • Assess the role things like educational level, income, and access to services play in treating mental illness
    • Examine the contributions of various policies to mental health status of groups
    • Appraise the various treatment options available through a variety of community-based prevention, intervention, and treatment programs
    • Recognize the role mental health plays in various other community-based social health issues such as prisons and substance abuse treatment, and homelessness

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/19/2016

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 412 - Aging and Public Health (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    Population aging is a major challenge facing public health. Public health professionals must be prepared to meet the social, economic, and healthcare needs of aging populations. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Discuss the challenges of aging in society and the public health impacts of population aging.
    • Demonstrate their knowledge of the implications of age related disease and disability on the health of the individual and the healthcare, social, and economic systems of society.
    • Analyze policies that impact successful aging and those that prevent healthy aging. 
    • Prepare a position stand on an age related health issue.
    • Evaluate the effectiveness of healthy aging programs. 

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/19/2016

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 413 - Health Disparities in Rural and Frontier Communities


    Description:
    Overview of differences in health statuses, resources, and outcomes in rural and frontier communities in the U.S. from a population health perspective. PUBH 413 and PUBH 513 are layered courses. Students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Spring and Summer Quarters).

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and analyze differences in health status and outcomes in rural and frontier communities using publicly available data
    • Identify elements of health systems specific to rural and frontier communities
    • Discuss strategies aimed at improving health disparities in rural and frontier communities
    • Assess a public health program and/or policy using a case study approach

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/1/2016

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 420 - Women’s Health Issues


    Description:
    This course examines selected women’s health issues and their physical, mental, and emotional effects, as well as the political, social, and cultural climates that influence the health of women. ​Course will be offered every year (Winter).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key health issues that disproportionately affect women and/or that are unique to women and those who identify as women. 
    • Identify and assess community resources that aim to promote the health of women and/or address health disparities related to women’s health issues. 
    • Differentiate women’s health conditions (infectious and non-infectious) from a treatment and prevention perspective.
    • Critique and discuss components and influences of physical, emotional, mental, and sexual health of women from a gender-perspective.
    • Identify and examine the health status/issues of a vulnerable sub-population and evaluate the historical and contemporary treatment of the sub-population in the health care system.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 422 - Community Health Communication and Promotion


    Description:
    Based upon the seven areas of responsibility for entry-level health educators, students will utilize best practices in prevention science to develop methods/materials to educate individuals and groups on topics that they need to remain healthy. PUBH 422 and PUBH 522 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Winter and Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Co- or Prerequisites: PUBH 380 and PUBH 375 or by instructor permission. 

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define and describe methods of health promotion, including community education, health communication, social marketing, and policy
    • Identify evidence-based health promotion initiatives (education, health communication, social marketing and policy) that address risk factors for various community health problems.
    • Critique health promotion strategies (education, health communication, social marketing, and policy) in terms of their impact on health.
    • Plan and apply a theory-based education strategy, using appropriate mass media and electronic technology, to address a community health issue.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/12/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 424 - Maternal and Child Health


    Description:
    A survey of public health issues affecting women, children, and families from a population health perspective.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PUBH 230.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the broad range of individual, environmental, biological, and social determinants of health of women, children, and families
    • Discuss methods and data sources used for assessing maternal and child health from a population health perspective
    • Develop strategies and interventions to improve the health needs of women, children, and families 
    • Identify and evaluate the implications of policies that affect maternal and child health at the local, state, federal, and international level

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/19/2016

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 440 - Public Health Communication (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    Basic theory and practice of public health communications to inform and influence individual and community decisions that enhance health. Course will be offered every year (Fall and Summer). (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PUBH 230.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and differentiate between public health communication theories and strategies
    • Utilize market research techniques to design health communication materials
    • Critique existing public health communication materials (e.g. public service announcements, websites, multi-media, social marketing, etc).
    • Describe the role of health literacy and numeracy in communicating health promotion concepts with the public
    • Describe the advantages and disadvantages of different types of media in public health communications
    • Design and plan a comprehensive public health communication campaign related to a specific health problem or challenge

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/3/2016

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 445 - Professionalism in Public Health


    Description:
    Professional ethics, job readiness, and job search in public health. Students will propose their culminating experience/capstone in this course in preparation for graduation. To be taken last two quarters before internship placement. Formerly HED 445, students may not receive credit for both. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PUBH 230, and PUBH 240, and PUBH 375 and acceptance into the public health major.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Review principles of professionalism and professional ethics in public health careers
    • Prepare a professional resume and accompanying materials for a public health job search
    • Identify methods of career/professional development (e.g. volunteerism, community involvement/experience, professional organization membership, job shadowing, interning, mentoring, etc).
    • Prepare and deliver a mock job interview and offer peer-to-peer feedback on interviewing
    • Prepare a scope of work and timeline for completion of the capstone project.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/12/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 448 - Sexual Health


    Description:
    This course surveys sexual health from a public health perspective, focusing on both individual and societal factors contributing to sexual health. Course will be offered every year (Fall and Spring).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify anatomical and physiological aspects of human sexual functions.
    • Identify male and female specific sexual function and sexual variation.
    • Comprehend the risk factors, prevention, and treatments for various sexually related diseases and dysfunctions.
    • Analyze the affect of sexual health education on health outcomes across various states, countries, and cultures.
    • Synthesize information about how sexual beliefs, values, and behaviors can influence sexuality and health over the life span. Students will discuss the findings of these reports.
    • Evaluate the impact of policies affecting sexual health in the US.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 460 - Public Health Ethics


    Description:
    Overview of key ethical frameworks and their application to ethical issues in public health practice. Formerly HED 460, students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PUBH 230 and PUBH 240 and acceptance into public health major and senior standing.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the role of personal values, morals, and biases in ethical decision-making
    • Describe the process for ethical decision making in public health
    • Review major ethical events in U.S. public health history
    • Analyze the ethical implications of community-based practice and research
    • Discuss strategies and models for the ethical distribution of constrained resources for health

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/5/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 465 - Research Experience in Public Health


    Description:
    This course is intended to help undergraduate students pursue research projects related to population health. The course will help prepare the learner to complete a variety of necessary steps to design, implement, and disseminate possible short-term research projects under the mentorship and guidance of faculty member(s) and with the assistance of rigorous review from peers. It is expected that students will emerge from this course with at least one scholarly product that could be presented at SOURCE or other relevant academic venues. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PUBH 375 and PUBH 380 and PUBH 445 or by instructor permission.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and evaluate various study designs and methods for public health research
    • Identify the appropriate mechanisms and ethical protocols for the protection of human subjects in public health research
    • Prepare a research proposal, including a review and synthesis of relevant literature, identified gaps in current literature, and propose research question and/or testable hypotheses
    • Implement a proposed research project related to public and population health, such as a systematic literature review, quantitative or qualitative analysis of data, case study, or other relevant study design
    • Participate in the peer review process of proposed research studies in public and population health
    • develop a research abstract in public and population health
    • Propose a plan for dissemination of their intended research project, such as a research poster or presentation at SOURCE, professional associations, conferences, peer-review or other academic journals, public forums, or other appropriate venues
    • Prepare a final research product, including a research poster/oral presentation and/or research manuscript for submission to undergraduate journal.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/12/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 470 - Public Health Programming


    Description:
    Population health assessment. Public health program planning, implementation, and evaluation.  Formerly HED 330 and HED 470, students may only receive credit for one. Course will be offered every year (Fall).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PUBH 230 and PUBH 240 and PUBH 375 and PUBH 380 or by instructor permission. 

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify, discuss, and appraise tools and data sources used to assess population health.
    • Critique existing public health programs, implementation, and evaluation strategies and outcomes.
    • Select and apply health behavior theory to develop population health programming and interventions.
    • Develop goals and objectives for a public health program, based on population health assessment data and evidence.
    • Create a timeline and logic model for a public health program and evaluation.
    • Propose a public health program and evaluation.
    • Summarize the challenges faced in programming for population health.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/12/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 471 - Program Planning


    Description:
    Health program planning including needs assessment and goal setting. PUBH 471 and PUBH 571 are layered courses; a student may not receive credit for both. Formerly HED 471, students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PUBH 470 and acceptance into public health major.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Use the language and concepts of program planning, including behavioral and other theory and planning models, relevant for public health improvement.
    • Use literature and other data to produce a rationale for a public health-relevant program or other intervention.
    • Write mission, vision, values, and goal statements, as well as measurable objectives surrounding population health improvement and their program’s success.
    • Prepare a feasible plan for program implementation, including planned evaluation strategies.
    • Present their plan formally to an audience of peers, professionals, and campus and community stakeholders.
    • Graduate students will be able to summarize best practices used in public health program planning
    • Graduate students will be able to assemble extant or collect original needs assessment data to support public health program, including community needs, strengths, assets, barriers, resources, and target outcomes
    • Graduate students will be able to demonstrate program plan designs that incorporate culturally-sensitive and culturally-relevant information, processes, resources, and outcomes
    • Graduate students will be able to communicate public health information and content through multiple methods and across a wide variety of audiences, literacy levels, and venues
    • Graduate students will identify strategies to engage members of the target population and other collaborative partners in public health program plans

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    PUBH 472 - Program Implementation and Evaluation


    Description:
    Implementation and evaluation of programs and other strategies designed to improve population health outcomes. Formerly HED 472, students may not receive credit for both. PUBH472 and PUBH572 are layered courses and cannot be taken for duplicate credit.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PUBH 471 and acceptance into public health major.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the relationship between an effective plan and implementation of a public health intervention
    • Translate an existing plan into action using a linear process involving strategizing with peers and instructor, and taking steps toward their goal
    • Work with colleagues to produce a completed campus- or community-based intervention from an existing plan
    • Conduct an evaluation of a public health intervention
    • Describe challenges faced, and resources useful in overcoming them
    • Effectively describe the implemented intervention, and communicate evaluation results, to an audience of peers, professionals, and campus and community stakeholders
    • Synthesize key findings from their intervention evaluation and assemble them for academic and professional audiences
    • Select and justify an appropriate evaluation design for a proposed public health intervention
    • Design implementation and evaluation strategies that engage culturally-sensitive and culturally-relevant information, processes, communication, resources, and outcomes
    • Utilize fiscal, resource, and organizational management tools including operating budgets, forecasting, hiring plans, variance analysis and other relevant methods
    • Identify strategies to engage members of the target population and other collaborative partners in the delivery of public health programming, evaluation, and dissemination

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    PUBH 475 - Community Health Administration


    Description:
    Understanding and application of knowledge to various administrative tasks in community health. Grants, management, and personnel issues will be covered.  Formerly HED 475, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Spring).

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe qualities of successful public health administrators.
    • Describe the importance of standards and essential skills in relation to effective management of public health programs.
    • Realize the role of public health leadership in community/population-based health.
    • Demonstrate skills of effective management in collaborative relationships.
    • Use skills needed to write a successful grant application.
    • Compare and contrast different funding sources.
    • Develop a grant application for a health-related topic.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/19/2017

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 479 - Senior Seminar in Public Health


    Description:
    This course is intended to provide students an opportunity to reflect on and synthesize coursework, academic background, and related professional development components in a topic-based and discussion-focused format.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: senior standing, public health major, most PUBH required courses complete or permission of instructor.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and analyze disciplinary areas of particular interest to them as developing professionals.
    • Discuss current and audience-relevant resources surrounding a public health issue or strategy area.
    • Identify areas of personal professional readiness, strengths, challenges, and desires for additional education and professional training.
    • List and discuss tasks related to pursuing further education, professional training, or positions in the field.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/19/2016

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 480 - Grant Seeking and Administration in Public Health


    Description:
    This course introduces students to grant seeking, writing, and administration in the broad field of public health. PUBH 480 and PUBH 580 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Fall).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PUBH 230 or PUBH 240.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate their knowledge of common public health funding sources.
    • Propose a program or project idea for which they will seek funding.
    • Evaluate grant proposal samples targeting health related projects.
    • Calculate and justify a budget for a health related grant proposal.  
    • Create a public health grant proposal.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/2/2017

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 488 - Culminating Experience in Public Health


    Description:
    The public health culminating experiences provides an opportunity for students to reflect upon, integrate, and demonstrate knowledge and skills from their undergraduate experiences to a final presentation of their applied public health project.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PUBH 445.

    Credits: (3)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate clear, discipline-appropriate oral and written communication strategies and techniques.
    • Reflect upon and integrate knowledge and skills from undergraduate experience as it relates to students’ applied public health project.
    • Critically appraise knowledge and skills gained through public health capstone experience/project in the context of three core functions of public health and/or ten essential services.
    • Articulate the relationship between the public health capstone project, knowledge and skills gained through the undergraduate experience, and the three core functions and/or ten essential services of public health.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/12/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 489 - Academic Service Learning in Public Health


    Description:
    Student will engage in community and/or campus based academic service learning related to public health. May be repeated under a different topic. Grade will either be S or U. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and describe a public health that exists in the campus and/or community.
    • Design and propose an academic service learning project that addresses a public health issue in the campus and/or community.
    • Develop learner-led outcomes related to public health to achieve through their academic service learning project.
    • Apply principles of public health to a campus or community based academic service learning project.
    • Relate public health program coursework to their academic service learning project.
    • Evaluate impact of public health academic service learning project on campus and/or community partner/issue using appropriate measures. 

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/5/2019

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  
    Learning Agreement Forms

    PUBH 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized, contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. May be repeated up to 12 credits. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: prior approval required.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 496 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 498 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    PUBH 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Recreation (REC)

  
  •  

    REC 150 - Experience Leadership Project


    Description:
    A unique experiential transition program held off-campus (camp/outdoors/community) designed to provide students with the skills and networks to develop leadership skills and Wildcat spirit.  Formerly RT/RTE 150, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify elements of effective communication.
    • Match student needs to campus resources and services.
    • Demonstrate interpersonal and intrapersonal growth.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    6/4/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    REC 210 - Student Leadership


    Description:
    Provides leadership experiences in the planning/implementing of student activities and services within Recreation Programs.  Students will initiate on-campus or off-campus community projects, programs, and activities. May be repeated up to 3 credits. Formerly RTE 210, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the leadership process and discuss how values and experiences affect how individuals choose to serve and lead.
    • Identify the elements of effective community programs.
    • Diagram elements of effective community programs.
    • Write a personal philosophy statement of leadership, social responsibility and civic duty.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/22/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    REC 300 - Challenge Course Leadership


    Description:
    Students will develop leadership skills using the challenge course. Specifically, students will learn and use facilitation techniques to improve group and individual interaction.  Formerly RT/RTE 300, students may only receive credit for one.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate how different apparatus of a Challenge Course works.
    • Apply a leadership model to improve self- awareness or team work.
    • Demonstrate the process of evaluation to improve activities.
    • Identify and apply group facilitation techniques.

     
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/22/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg

  
  •  

    REC 321 - Leadership in Human Development


    Description:
    This highly interactive (challenge course, community service) course focuses on developing students’ leadership skills that provide a base for improved communication in both personal and professional situations. Formerly FSCG/FCS 220, students may only receive credit for one.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify leadership theories and models
    • Demonstrate and assess active listening skills
    • Identify personal participation style in activities and relationships
    • Self-assess personal contributions in teamwork
    • Demonstrate the elements of effective interpersonal communication in professional and personal life, through concept application and evaluating results
    • Demonstrate teambuilding skills to overcome challenges and create positive results
    • Identify the power and influence leaders can and should have over others
    • Demonstrate an increase sense of self-efficacy and civic responsibility for addressing community issues

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/22/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg, Online Winter Locations: Ellensburg, Online Spring Locations: Ellensburg, Online Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online

  
  •  

    REC 322 - Recreation Programming and Activities


    Description:
    The essential skill of recreation programming will be developed. Games and activities appropriate for playgrounds, camps, and community centers are learned, along with socialization, education, trust building, and outdoor adventure.  Formerly RT/RTE 222, students may only receive credit for one.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate programming in class and, in practical situations.
    • Develop a program from conceptualization to implementation.
    • Demonstrate, plan, and lead a game or adventure activity.
    • Identify the fundamentals of play leadership.
    • Demonstrate concern for safety of self and others
    • Modify a games for a specific identifiable population.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/22/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    REC 333 - Outdoor Adventures in Public Lands


    Description:
    This course is designed to provide students an experiential education in outdoor recreation within public lands. Students will explore how ideas become thoughtful practice in outdoor adventure program. Ability to hike and camp in wilderness areas. Formerly RT/RTE 333, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify Issues pertaining to outdoor recreation.
    • Outline broad-based models that describe the issues.
    • Construct a theoretical model that pertains to an issue in outdoor recreation.
    • Design a 1-3 hour activity that meets specific parameters established in the models.
    • Test the theoretical model through observation and questionnaire research methods.
    • Revise the theoretical model based on observational and questionnaire research methods.
    • Defend a theoretical model.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/22/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Summer Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    REC 339 - Recreation Enterprise Development


    Description:
    This course focuses on the Business Plan as a necessary component to beginning a small business in the fields of Recreation. It addresses facets of the business plan from determining actual content, reviewing examples to creating a comprehensive plan. Formerly RTE 339, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify different organizational structures used in recreation.
    • Describe the components of a business plan.
    • Critique the business plans of several other start-up ventures in recreation
    • Create a formal business plan for a recreation enterprise

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/22/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    REC 340 - Introduction to Adventure Programming


    Description:
    The course is an overview of the history, evolution and implementation of adventure learning in education. Students will mix classroom time and field experience. Course will be offered on even numbered years. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern. Formerly RTE 340, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the history and evolution of Adventure Education.
    • Select “best” adventure theories to use in various situations.
    • Design appropriate outdoor program for selected participants.
    • Implement outdoor program.
    • Assess outdoor program effectiveness through data collected.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/22/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    REC 345 - Backcountry Leadership


    Description:
    Prepares students to be leaders in outdoor settings by building the practical and logistical skills needed in the effective delivery of trips. Covers the teaching skills and essentials for trip leaders in the wilderness, including trip planning, logistics, risk management, and group interaction in the back-country. Course will be offered on odd numbered years. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern. Formerly RTE 345, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify methods for teaching kinesthetic skills.
    • Illustrate the proper use of trip policies and procedures.
    • Develop and implement an Incident Response Plan for the end of term outing.
    • Apply camping and backpacking techniques.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of risk management planning.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/22/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
 

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