Jun 15, 2024  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Courses numbered from 101–299 are lower-division courses, primarily for freshmen and sophomores; those numbered from 300–499 are upper-division courses, primarily for juniors and seniors. The numbers 296, 396, 496, and 596 designate individual study courses and are available for registration by prior arrangement with the course instructor and approval of the department chair.

The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the amount of credit each course carries. Variable credit courses include the minimum and maximum number of the credits within parentheses.

Not all of the courses are offered every quarter. Final confirmation of courses to be offered, information on new courses and programs, as well as a list of hours, instructor, titles of courses and places of class meetings, is available online in My CWU which can be accessed through the the CWU home page, and go to www.cwu.edu/registrar/course-information

 

Information Technology (IT)

  
  • IT 312 - Advanced Application of Web Tools


    Description:
    Advance website construction and design using contemporary tools and techniques.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 248.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain vector based graphics and multimedia formats.
    • Apply advanced HTML and CSS concepts.
    • Apply basic elements and principles of design to web sites.
    • Explain site planning, scaling, and site specifications.
    • Demonstrate responsive design techniques for cross-media and cross-platform graphic applications using CSS.
    • Publish multipage web sites using a remote web server.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 322 - Innovative Design in Web


    Description:
    Design and implementation of the information technology infrastructure needed to operate a business Web site.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 312.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain site planning, scaling, and site specifications
    • Create original working code based in HTML
    • Employ CSS for formatting text elements
    • Employ CSS for page layout
    • Apply jQuery/Ajax components on a page, both with and without XML data
    • Incorporate XML data (including linked and graphic) in a webpage
    • Create and publish web pages that use linked external CSS style sheets
    • Read and reconfigure or repurpose existing HTML and CSS code

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 336 - Digital Forensics


    Description:
    Students will learn skills in digital forensics including how to analyze a device, retrieve “deleted” information, and methods of digital concealment.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 238.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the relevant processes, objectives, and goals of digital forensics.
    • Discuss the legal ramifications of digital forensics investigations.
    • Assess the tools and procedures necessary to investigate and evaluate a perpetrator’s computer assets from a digital forensics perspective.
    • Analyze digital concealment and recovery techniques and related technologies including hardware, software, and networked computers and systems.
    • Utilize digital concealment and recovery techniques and related technologies.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg, Online Winter Locations: Online Spring Locations: Online Summer Locations: Online
  
  • IT 338 - Cybercrime


    Description:
    Investigate vulnerability of computer networks, systems, and computer applications. Learn methods of mitigation and/or prevention of cybercrime. Attributes of cybercrime such as virus attacks, identity theft, electronic funds transfers, and phishing will be examined.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 238.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the various attributes of cybercrime to include hacking, denial of service attacks, cyberstalking, cyberbullying, virus attacks, identity theft, electronic funds transfers, phishing, spoofing, internet fraud and similar attributes.
    • Investigate the vulnerability of computer applications, networks, and systems in terms of computer intrusions and attacks.
    • Analyze the impact of cybercrime (social, economic, and legal).
    • Discuss methods of the mitigation and/or prevention of cybercrime.
    • Utilize tools and procedures to include hardware and/or software to mitigate cybercrime.
    • Discuss the legal ramifications of cybercrime on individuals, organizations, and society.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/16/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Online Winter Locations: Online Spring Locations: Ellensburg, Online Summer Locations: Online
  
  • IT 351 - Computer Networks


    Description:
    Computer network communications including LAN and WAN Topologies, Protocols and Services, such as TCP/IP, and Ethernet, within the context of the OSI Reference Model.  Formerly IT 452, students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define fundamental networking concepts, components, and functions and the three basic network designs
    • Describe how network components are linked either by physical media such as cable or by wireless methods such as infrared or radio transmissions
    • Explain the theoretical structure which forms the foundation of all network activity (OSI model)
    • Identify the different network components such as drivers, packets, and protocols
    • Explain how the access methods control the flow of data across the network
    • Describe the major components, features, and functions of the primary network architectures or layouts
    • Describe the operating system, applications, utilities, and special languages that make it possible for networks to provide the services they do. (Client/Server)
    • Explain what is involved in managing and supporting a network in its day-to-day functions of providing services to its users
    • Describe how networks grow from a LAN into larger WAN’ s
    • Describe how to manage a network to keep it running smoothly

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/17/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 359 - Advanced Spreadsheet Applications


    Description:
    Advanced spreadsheets for business applications such as design of multiple sheet workbooks and templates, advanced functions and formulas, enhanced formats, lists, and pivot tables.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 258 or IT 260.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Construct simple and compound statements and selected functions.
    • Examine lists, data filters and subtotals.
    • Employ macros.
    • Apply What if analysis, goal seek, forecasts.
    • Analyze data with Pivot Tables and Pivot Charts.
    • Demonstrate the application of common statistical methods using spreadsheet formulas.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 362 - Wireless Communications


    Description:
    Broad introduction to wireless communications. Provides students with an exposure to a variety of technologies, standards, and concepts.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe wireless communications: how it works, how it is used, its advantages and disadvantage
    • Contrast and compare radio and infrared wireless communication: models, transmission and standards
    • Describe, explain, configure, and troubleshoot short range wireless communications
    • Identify, troubleshoot, and correct Wireless Local Area Networks and associated protocols
    • Plan and conduct a wireless site survey to evaluate wireless network design for optimum coverage
    • Describe and explain digital Cellular Telephone Applications, Technology and Client software
    • Describe and explain fixed broadband wireless and satellite communication
    • Identify, describe, and explain the uses and challenges of wireless communications in business
    • Describe, explain, configure, and troubleshoot wireless network security

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/7/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • IT 363 - Data Mining for IT Managers


    Description:
    Students will learn to extract data, apply learning methods, and prepare data for further analysis. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 359.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the procedures involved in extracting useful data from multiple sources in an IT Management context.
    • Differentiate between intelligence and analytics and describe the role of each in data-driven decision making.
    • Explain various supervised learning methods that can be used to derive meaning from trained data sets in an IT Management context.
    • Explain various unsupervised learning methods that can be used to derive meaning from large sets in an IT Management context.
    • Identify the best tools to apply to data sets to prepare them for analysis in an IT Management context.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 365 - Data Driven Innovation


    Description:
    Introduction to data analysis techniques that enables real-time decision making in IT organizations. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 363.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the role of machine learning in data mining
    • Apply models and algorithms as used in data mining techniques
    • Analyze the value of data mining techniques used in the information technology field
    • Evaluate visualization techniques used in data mining

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/15/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 370 - The Command Line Interface and Cybersecurity


    Description:
    This course provides an introduction to the cybersecurity script programming paradigm, and introduces and compares a range of security scripting languages used for Linux and Web-based applications.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 238.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Utilize looping and selection statements.
    • Utilize truth tables in the evaluation of conditions.
    • Construct a script that will help secure a system.
    • Evaluate a script for security vulnerabilities.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/7/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Online
  
  • IT 376 - Project Management and Information Technology


    Description:
    IT project management with a focus on facilitating project management areas; risk management, procurement management, HR management, and communication management. Microsoft Project will be used.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: students must be junior standing or above.

    Credits: (3)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 378 - IT Service Management


    Description:
    The focus of this class will be on IT service support and delivery. Additional topics such as the management of IT infrastructure, cybersecurity, enterprise architecture, and software assets are also covered.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ADMG 374.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the metrics necessary to manage the deployment of an organization’s technology assets.
    • Identify the processes for managing the services provided by an IT department.
    • Evaluate change management requirements of regulations for IT compliance.
    • Develop service level requirements and agreements to measure and assess supplier performance.
    • Align IT infrastructure and service delivery activities to an organizations’ core processes.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/22/21

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Online Winter Locations: Online Spring Locations: Online Summer Locations: Online
  
  • IT 381 - Web Apps for M-Commerce


    Description:
    This course will introduce concepts in developing business web apps for use in m-commerce. Web apps review and development using web app authoring/application software for various operating systems.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 322.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of web app planning, scaling, and specifications.
    • Document web app goals, requirements and internal specifications.
    • Demonstrate the ability to create original working web apps.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of native web apps for multiple OS.
    • Create simple dynamic/interactive m-commerce web apps.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/1/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 388 - Cloud Fundamentals for IT Managers


    Description:
    This course provides students with a broad understanding of cloud computing technology and services within IT Management.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 378.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the core concepts of the cloud computing ecosystem and its relationship to the spectrum of hosted/on-premise solutions
    • Distinguish between different types of cloud offerings and emerging technologies
    • Analyze various cloud models and apply them to solve organizational challenges
    • Determine the potential impact of cloud-based systems and technology on management processes

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/22/21

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Online Winter Locations: Online Spring Locations: Online Summer Locations: Online
  
  • IT 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 425 - Reporting Data and Analytics


    Description:
    Skills and applications in pre-processing and preparing as well as presenting and reporting data for further analysis.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 365.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply push and pull approaches to analytics reporting.
    • Interpret information about people in organizations in terms of its usefulness in strategic process decisions.
    • Construct actionable information by using tools to process large data sets.
    • Evaluate potential solutions based on analytics data.
    • Justify recommendations using data mining and analytics appropriate for a client-based environment.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 426 - Application of Web Languages


    Description:
    Web languages for the non-computer science student.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 322.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Select appropriate languages to accomplish specific tasks on a Website
    • Document site goals, requirements and internal specifications
    • Conduct an informal usability test of a Website
    • Explain how browser compatibility can determine functionality of your site
    • Choose an appropriate platform for site development
    • Design site architecture that includes appropriate security considerations
    • Identify key components in development and testing
    • Evaluate and use new technologies for use in a Website including XHTML, CSS, XML, Spry and Ajax
    • Plan and budget for the continued maintenance of a site
    • Create a plan for implementation of a medium sized site
    • Create a working site

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/1/2011

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 436 - Cyberattack/Defense


    Description:
    Examines the techniques and technologies for penetration of networks, detection of attacks, and the prevention of attacks. This course addresses the techniques, technologies, and methodologies used by cyberintruders.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 238.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the major components of the cyber-attack/defense domain.
    • Investigate cyber deterrence capabilities.
    • Investigate reconstitution and robustness capabilities designed to enable U.S. systems to continue to function once they have suffered cyber damage.
    • Assess tools and procedures to include hardware and/or software to simulate an attack on an adversary.
    • Utilize tools and procedures to include hardware and/or software to simulate an attack on an adversary.
    • Discuss the implications societally, socially, legally, and technologically, of cyber-attacks on an entity.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/7/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Online Winter Locations: Ellensburg, Online Spring Locations: Online Summer Locations: Online
  
  • IT 437 - Mobile and Cloud Forensics


    Description:
    Students will learn skills in mobile and cloud forensics including how to analyze a mobile device, retrieve “deleted” information, recover information from the cloud environment and methods of digital concealment. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 336.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Appraise a given scenario, and then choose the correct digital forensic tool and technique for that scenario.
    • Prepare a cloud forensics case using the tools provided in the text and other research areas.
    • Prepare a mobile digital forensics report after being provided the scenario and necessary tools to include software.
    • Demonstrate the understanding of digital forensics in situations where the device is an IoT, Mobile Device, Cloud environment or standard desktop environment.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/15/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 438 - IT Risk Management


    Description:
    Explores Networking Security from the perspective of risk management to develop strategies to mitigate and manage risks. Focuses on assessment strategies for effective mitigation measures and risk management practices in terms of cybersecurity.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 238.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify risk assessment strategies requisite to implement risk mitigation measures and practices.
    • Identify the levels of sensitivity of information kept by an organization and the procedures necessary to protect it.
    • Examine the tools and procedures utilized by attackers to infiltrate an organization’s infrastructure in order to obtain sensitive information.
    • Develop an effective risk management plan for organizations of various sizes, compositions, and industries.
    • Construct a disaster recovery plan for organizations of various sizes, compositions, and industries.
    • Discuss the legal ramifications in the risk management arena from an IT perspective.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/16/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Online Winter Locations: Ellensburg, Online Spring Locations: Online Summer Locations: Online
  
  • IT 456 - Advanced Computer Network Management


    Description:
    Students will analyze network requirements, design network infrastructures, and install, configure and maintain routing and switching equipment.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define the purpose of routing and switching
    • Identify the principles of network design
    • Design a switched network
    • Install, configure, & manage routing and switching equipment
    • Load multiple protocols and be able to differentiate between routing and routed protocols

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/16/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • IT 459 - Workstation Administration


    Description:
    Implementation, administration, and troubleshooting workstations as a desktop operating system in any network environment.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Install A Workstation Networking Software
    • Implement and conduct administration of resources
    • Implement manage, and troubleshoot hardware devices, and drivers
    • Monitor and optimize system performance and reliability
    • Configure and Troubleshoot the Desktop Environment
    • Implement, Manage, and Troubleshoot Network Protocols and Services
    • Implement, Monitor, and Troubleshoot Security

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/7/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • IT 461 - Systems Analysis


    Description:
    Feasibility studies of systems, cost analysis, budgets, and tools of systems analysis.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: senior standing.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Position system analysis in the development process
    • Develop an understanding of the concepts of problem recognition and problem definition
    • Use tools like PIECES framework
    • Explain in detail the individual phases of the SDLC, along with the expected activities and deliverables from each
    • Identify and select IS projects
    • Gather and organize end users’ requirements
    • Read, correct, and create data flow diagrams (DFD)
    • Read, correct, and create entity relationship diagrams (ERO)
    • Perform basic project management tasks associated with scope, time and budget
    • Understand ERO extensions
    • Create logical and relational models
    • Write a system proposal
    • Understand the basic elements of other analysis methods like object oriented analysis or rapid application development
    • Understand the job of system analyst
    • Work effectively in a pair
    • Follow a process to solve organizational problems
    • Write better

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/2/2006

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 463 - Computer Network Management


    Description:
    Develop and improve network administration and management skills within a network server environment.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Install Windows 2000 Server
    • Install, Configure, and Troubleshoot Access to Resources
    • Configure and Troubleshoot Hardware Devices and Drivers
    • Manage, monitor, and optimize system performance, reliability, and availability
    • Manage, configure, and troubleshoot storage use
    • Configure and Troubleshoot Network Connections
    • Implement, monitor, and troubleshoot security

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/7/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • IT 464 - Directory Services (Put on reserve 9/16/18)


    Description:
    Students will plan, implement, and maintain directory service features including forests, sites, domains, and organizational units to meet network accessibility, performance, and security goals. (Put on reserve 9/16/18, will go inactive 8/24/21)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 463.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Evaluate network traffic when planning and creating global catalog servers
    • Improve network efficiency and performance using operations master roles
    • Implement a directory service forest and domain structure
    • Manage forest and domain structure
    • Monitor, diagnose and restore directory services
    • Identify security issues and plan an effective strategy for dealing with those issues
    • Plan and implement a strategy for configuring user and computer environments using Group Policy
    • Maintain installed software using Group Policy

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/15/2004

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 466 - Open Source Server Management


    Description:
    Open Source Server Management covers the concepts required for Linux/UNIX server system administration and common networking services configuration, operation, and management.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 459.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Install, configure, & manage a Linux server for network environments
    • Compare Linux administration from the command line shell with GUI based tools
    • Install, configure, and manage some of the more commonly used network services, (DHCP, DNS, LDAP, email)
    • Install, configure, and manage file and print services
    • Install, configure, & manage a Linux web server and associated services (http, ftp, php, mySQL)
    • Demonstrate best practices for secure server standards within a networked computing environment

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/16/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 467 - Network Security


    Description:
    Analysis and design of computer network security in the business environment.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 463.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze the existing and planned business model
    • Analyze the existing and planned organizational structures
    • Analyze factors that influence company strategies
    • Analyze business and security requirements for the end user
    • Analyze the structure of IT management
    • Analyze the current physical model and information security model
    • Evaluate the company’s existing and planned technical environment
    • Analyze the impact of the security design on the existing and planned technical environment
    • Design a security baseline for a network
    • Identify the required level of security for each resource
    • Design an audit policy
    • Design a delegation of authority strategy
    • Design a placement and inheritance of security policies for sites, domains, and organizational units
    • Design an Encrypting File System strategy
    • Design an authentication strategy

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    6/1/2006

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 468 - Projects in Database


    Description:
    Techniques in database design and management.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 260.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of terminology used in database management
    • Demonstrate an understanding of relational models
    • Demonstrate an understanding of QBE and SOL
    • Demonstrate an understanding of Normalization
    • Demonstrate an understanding of Database Design
    • Demonstrate an understanding of Database Administration

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/7/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg, Online Winter Locations: Ellensburg, Online Spring Locations: Ellensburg, Online Summer Locations: Online
  
  • IT 469 - Enterprise Database Systems: SQL


    Description:
    Students will learn to write SQL statements, basic database administration, and report writing skills. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 468.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Manipulate a database on paper prior to working in SQL
    • Examine concepts and terminology associated with relational databases.
    • Use SQL to query a database, discussing the use of simple and compound conditions; computed columns; the SQL operators BETWEEN, LIKE, and IN; SQL functions; nesting queries; grouping data; and retrieving columns with null values.
    • Use queries to join multiple tables, discussing the SQL operators IN and EXIST, SQL set operations, and the use of the ALL and ANY operators.
    • Apply specific SQL commands, including COMMIT, ROLLBACK, UPDATE, INSERT, and DELETE commands to update table data.
    • Use procedural code to write stored programs, including the use of transactions and locking.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/15/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 470 - Database and the Web Capstone


    Description:
    Provides a culminating experience for students in the Web and Database specialization; giving the students an opportunity to use knowledge from their specialization courses to develop a data-driven website, to include the associated database. Course will be offered every year (Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Corequisite: IT 426. Prerequisite: IT 468.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Develop a data-driven website
    • Connect to a database from within a script
    • Use SQL from within a script to query a database
    • Use a script to build dynamic web pages
    • Use a MVC architectural design pattern for a website

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/15/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 481 - Quality Verification and Validation


    Description:
    System quality improvement through reviews, testing, and quality management.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 461.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the aspects of quality assurance with particular focus on managing reviews and tests.
    • Define the roles of developer, peer reviewer, and tester, and describe their interactions on a successful project.
    • Define the stages and types of review and testing in system development.
    • Demonstrate the inputs, deliverables, and flows of the testing process.
    • Develop and implement a test plan, mining system specifications for useful test cases.
    • Apply an accepted document review technique for verification.
    • Deploy and utilize an effective automated testing tool.
    • Apply a suite of systems testing techniques for system validation.
    • Apply effective acceptance testing techniques for approval of delivery.
    • Manage defects for quality improvement.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/17/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 482 - Cybersecurity Capstone


    Description:
    This course is to provide a culminating experience for students in the cybersecurity specializations. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 336 and IT 338 and IT 436 and IT 438.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Given a scenario, students will use risk-assessment techniques to prioritize the defense of a given set of information assets.
    • Determine and implement the appropriate defensive mechanisms to protect the information assets.
    • Use various attack vectors to test the defensive mechanisms.
    • Use various digital forensics techniques to assess the effectiveness of their defensive mechanisms and to witness what data was breached.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/18/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 483 - Applied Predictive Analytics for IT Managers


    Description:
    Students will utilize the skills gained in the previous data and analytics courses for practical application to real-world IT problems. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Pre or co-requisites: IT 425 and IT 469.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the processes involved in mining, analyzing, and reporting on varied data sets in an IT Management context.
    • Consider how predictive models can be used with large datasets to drive meaning from the data.
    • Explain how predictive analytics can be utilized to support strategy in an IT Management context.
    • Apply critical thinking strategies to predictive analytics in an IT Management context.
    • Provide a cursory explanation of artificial intelligence (AI) and its likely impact on innovation and IT.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 486 - Critical Issues in Information Technology


    Description:
    This investigative study course provides a culminating opportunity for graduating IT seniors to adopt a societal perspective, collaborating to analyze key IT issues of today and tomorrow, and to publish the solutions online.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 301 and senior standing.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Work collaboratively to evaluate the criticality of current IT issues - technical, corporate, and global.
    • Lead a group investigation and synthesis of current knowledge and apply solutions to the most critical IT issues.
    • Think critically, analyzing colleagues’ proposals in the context of critical IT issues.
    • Publish resulting effective solutions to most critical IT issues, for use by industry.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/7/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Online Winter Locations: Online
  
  • IT 487 - Networking Capstone


    Description:
    This course will provide a culminating experience for students in the Networking specialization. This project-based course will provide the students the opportunity to use knowledge from their specialization courses to build a fully-functional, heterogeneous network. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 362 and IT 466 and IT 467.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Design and implement a network that is suitable for a small business that has at least two sites
    • Implement all infrastructure components on the network (DNS, AD, DHCP, etc.)
    • Implement firewalls on the network
    • Secure the network

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/15/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • Learning Agreement Forms

    IT 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized, contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student-learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: RMT 379.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 491 - Workshop


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 496 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IT 499 - Seminar


    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Integrated Energy Studies (IEM)

  
  • IEM 103 - Introduction to Energy and Science Inquiry


    Description:
    Complex global issues of regional energy and energy management impacts today’s global society and is best approached by learning and applying knowledge and skills of scientific investigation through basic life, physical, and earth sciences. Course will be offered every year (Fall).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K7 - Physical & Natural World

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P5 Sustainability, P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define, explain, and apply basic life, physical, and earth/space science concepts of energy science and global implications.
    • Design, perform, and modify approaches to inquiry-based experimentation through best practices research in energy science.
    • Identify and apply measurement technologies to record valid and reliable data during best practices research experimentation in energy science.
    • Analyze experimental data using tables, graphs, and math models to propose and experimentally test sustainable solutions to energy problems.
    • Research current literature, evaluate, create, use, modify, and defend perspectives of energy science that use evidence based claims that are scientifically valid and reliable through scientific investigation that yields experimental reproducible results.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/21/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IEM 198 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IEM 201 - Introduction to Energy Management


    Description:
    Principles and methods of energy management in residential, commercial and industrial settings, history of energy production; basics of energy supply and uses; energy conservation and efficiency in various settings; environmental, political and economic implications. Formerly IEM 301, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize the principles of energy management in different settings.
    • Discuss the history of energy production.
    • Explain the role of energy managers in identifying basie energy management techniques (auditing, optimization, etc.) to real world problems.
    • Identify energy conservation opportunities in residential, commercial, and industrial settings.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • IEM 290 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized field experience with energy companies and relevant governmental and non-governmental organizations to develop basic and advanced skills in energy management. The course involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. Instructor permission.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: by permission of director of the institute for integrated energy studies.

    Credits: (1-10)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Research, apply, interview, and obtain work in energy management related position.
    • Be able to discuss the benefits of the Integrated Energy Management degree and your career plans with a superior in the organization.
    • Describe the organizational structure of the placement, including scope, product or service, history, and management style and indicate possible career paths with the organization.
    • Analyze the connections that exist between the particular skills learned and tasks performed at the workplace with what was learned in the Integrated Energy Management degree program.
    • Evaluate how skills learned and tasks performed at the workplace help you understand and manage the main energy issues at local, national and global scales.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/9/2020

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • IEM 298 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IEM 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IEM 302 - Energy, Environment, and Climate Change


    Description:
    The course examines the physical principles behind climate change science and how they relate to energy and resource use on our planet. Emphasis placed on examining how energy decisions impact past, present, and future climates. Course will be offered every year (Winter).

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K8 - Science & Technology

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P5 Sustainability, P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the Earth’s climate system and how both natural and human factors influence the functioning of that system.
    • Explain how and why past climates vary from those of today and evaluate how energy production in all forms has influenced those climatic variations.
    • Discuss and present the ways in which global climate change impacts Earth’s non-energy resources (i.e., freshwater supply, food supply, faunal/floral biodiversity, soils, etc.) and the effects of this on society and its sustainability.
    • Evaluate how global energy production and consumption choices influence the development of Global Climate Models and how different scenarios (mathematical inputs) alter projections of future climate change.
    • Research, analyze, and present on the extent to which a select country/region contributes to global climate change and how their energy production and consumption decisions play a role in this.
    • Identify, collect, and critique data and literature resources relating to past, present, and future global climate change.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • IEM 310 - Inquiry Science in Energy Management (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    Interdisciplinary investigation of applied life, physical, and earth science concepts applicable to secondary school classrooms using integrated contexts.  Applied inquiry processes are used to increase student knowledge, skills, and dispositions. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ECON 130 or MATH 130 or MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe and explain basic life (biology), physical (chemistry/physics), and earth science (geology) concepts relevant to energy science.
    • Design and implement experiments using investigative processes in energy science.
    • Use computers and related technologies to gather and analyze data. 

    • Interpret and present data using quantitative reasoning including graphs, tables, and 
charts from scientific literature and hands-on scientific investigations. 

    • Work in small groups to solve complex problems relevant to energy science.
    • Form opinions based on scientific evidence and defend positions using both written and oral methods.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/4/2016

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IEM 330 - Geopolitics of Fossil Fuels


    Description:
    Critical analysis of the geopolitical characteristics of fossil fuels. Course draws upon policy, historical data, production and consumption patterns, and political processes to understand the relationship between fossil fuels and geopolitical processes around the world.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K4 - Global Dynamics

    General Education Pathways: P1 Civic & Community Engagement, P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify, analyze and evaluate past, present, and likely future developments in global, national, and local energy issues resulting from geopolitical changes.
    • Analyze the uneven distribution of fossil fuels around the world and discuss how their exploitation affects social groups in different ways based on diversity, inequality, privilege, or political power from a critical perspective.
    • Define geopolitical concepts that relate to fossil fuel energy systems and demonstrate an understanding of the processes required to become an active participant in the economy, politics, and the environment at a global scale.
    • Asses significant energy resource issues and identify social, cultural, economic, historic, environmental, or political factors of concern regarding production, transportation, transformation, and consumption of fossil fuels globally.
    • Write, research, analyze, and present on any complex global energy problems that address themes covered in class.
    • Explain the different strategies used by petro-states to influence political decisions and propose ways in which the impacts of these strategies affect society locally, regionally, and globally.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • IEM 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IEM 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IEM 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IEM 399 - Seminar


    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IEM 443 - Energy Policy


    Description:
    Legal, institutional, and economic frameworks for regional, national, and international energy decisions. Formerly GEOG 443, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the policy process in the US and identify the variables that influence energy policy outcomes.
    • Identify the steps in a rational-comprehensive policy analysis framework.
    • Identify a range of environmental/energy policy instruments (e.g., regulation, tradable permits, taxes, subsidies, legal instruments) and articulate their strengths and limitations as applied to environmental problems.
    • Identify and describe the multifaceted dimensions of a variety of energy “problems” (e.g., climate change, new energy resource development, energy transportation).
    • Follow the steps in policy formulation to develop an energy policy that attempts to resolve an environmental/energy problem.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • IEM 489 - Integrated Energy Management Capstone


    Description:
    Capstone course designed to assess student’s mastering of fundamental knowledge of energy management through a submission of a portfolio of work collected throughout the program. Exploration of future opportunities and exit interview with program director. Grade will be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admitted to integrated energy management major with senior standing.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Illustrate through familiarity with the discipline’s vocabulary, concepts and themes, and the complexity of energy systems, energy resources, and political-economic processes.
    • Define and discuss historical and contemporary energy problems, policies, and processes in the field.
    • Identify the patterns created through the interactions between human processes and energy systems (i.e. production, distribution, petrochemical transformations, and consumption) and the manner in which political and economic processes shape nature and society.  
    • Analyze the value of an interdisciplinary approach to analyze the social, political, economic, and environmental implications of energy systems and energy transition in the world.
    • Identify professional opportunities and prospects for energy managers.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/4/2016

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IEM 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized field experience with energy companies and relevant governmental and non-governmental organizations to develop basic and advanced skills in energy management. The course involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. Instructor permission. Grade will either be S or U. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: by permission of director of the institute for integrated energy studies.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Research, apply, interview, and obtain work in energy management related position for at least nine weeks.
    • Be able to discuss the benefits of the Integrated Energy Management degree and your career plans with a superior in the organization.
    • Describe the organizational structure of the placement, including scope, product or service, history, and management style and indicate possible career paths with the organization.
    • Analyze the connections that exist between the particular skills learned and tasks performed at the workplace with what was learned in the Integrated Energy Management degree program.
    • Evaluate how skills learned and tasks performed at the workplace help you understand and manage the main energy issues at local, national and global scales.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/9/2020

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg

  
  • IEM 496 - Individual Study


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IEM 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IEM 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IEM 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS)

  
  • IDS 289 - Introduction to the Major


    Description:
    Introduction to the interdisciplinary studies major, interdisciplinary studies degree proposal design and preparation. By permission. Grade will either be S or U.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Design an individual course of study leading to the accomplished through the Interdisciplinary Studies - Social Sciences degree program.
    • Design an individual course of study leading to the accomplishment of the individual learning goals.
    • Design an individual learning plan, including academic goals, to be accomplished in the Interdisciplinary Studies-Social Sciences degree program.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/6/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 298 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 305 - Surviving to Thriving: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Developing Resiliency and Coping


    Description:
    Critical exploration of concepts, research, and techniques pertaining to resiliency and coping. Application of biopsychosocial and cultural perspectives. Students will utilize experiential exercises to understand ways to enhance optimism, decrease stressors, and improve well-being. Course will be offered every year (Winter, Summer).

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Distinguish between resilient and non-resilient characteristics.
    • Outline the variety of factors (biopshychosocial and cultural) that contribute to resiliency.
    • Analyze the development of resiliency.  
    • Predict resiliency and decipher coping capabilities, limitations, and competencies.
    • Design an individual plan to apply resiliency-related concepts to approaches to life situations.
    • Implement and evaluate a variety of resiliency and coping techniques by applying and executing some of the strategies included in individual plans of study.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 311 - Don’t Lie to Me: Contemporary Profiling


    Description:
    This course explores and examines the use of profiles is contemporary policing with a focus on violent crimes. The discussions and readings examine what criminal profiling is, what it accomplishes, and how it is utilized. Criminological theory and applicable research articles are used to examine the legitimacy of profiles and measures deception.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101 or SOC 107.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an understanding of the basic theories and practice surrounding profiling.
    • Identify measures of deception and how to detect them.
    • Review and apply contemporary research articles associated to the basic theory (profiling) and the relevance that they provide to the practice of profiling.
    • Teach students the psycho-social impacts that influence serial and habitual offenders in their formative years.
    • Identify the basic personality types represented within the habitual offender population and the most common “triggers” of violent and anti-social actions.
    • Identify and differentiate the basic “signatures” of serial offenders and to interpret archival clues contained in report and scene documentation.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/19/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 321 - Body Image, Wellness and Popular Culture


    Description:
    This course focuses on body disturbances and how they affect wellness; including examination of how popular culture influences them. Various aspects, influences and assessments of body image will be used as the basis to develop an action plan to prevent and/or support individuals who experience them.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    Describe the signs and symptoms of body image disturbances and how these disorders impact the different aspects of wellness.

    Identify and interpret aspects of popular culture that leads to unhealthy attitudes and practices surrounding weight, shape and physical appearance in general.

    List the ways in which one can prevent and treat body image disturbances.

    Articulate how to decrease the impact body image disturbances can have on a person’s wellness.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/5/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
  • IDS 323 - Dangerous Women: Mad, Bad or Misunderstood


    Description:
    Violent crimes are generally associated with men; however, more and more women are becoming dangerous criminals. This class examines different theories behind violent women. Material will include cases of real-life female criminals, as well as fictional representations in movies and television.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PSY 101 or SOC 107.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Ability to identify the various theories relating to violent behavior in women.
    • Increased ability to critically analyze and discuss controversial topics and actively participate in group discussions with peers and professor.
    • Produce interdisciplinary research and persuasively argue a position based on this research.
    • Ability to create dynamic presentations around a central theme.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/3/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 343 - Origins and Results of Food Technology: The Gluttonous Human


    Description:
    As food production technologies have become increasingly complex, humans are facing adverse consequences. This course explores the evolution of feeding strategies from Paleolithic until the present, including corporate farming, GMO, and diseases of novel environments. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K4 - Global Dynamics

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being, P3 Perspectives on Current Issues

    Learner Outcomes:
     

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine the Neolithic revolution, the development of agriculture, its origin, the various steps up to GMO plants.
    • Contrast food choices and availability among various social classes and commensurate outcomes in health, especially obesity.
    • Outline approaches to the management of natural and labor resources in various settings: Tiwanaku, Machu Picchu, Bali, Bolivia
    • Examine diseases of novel environment and infections from viruses.  Inventory the use of chemicals, additives, dyes, flavorings, and preservatives in food.
    • Apply evolutionary approaches to understand obesity in the United States. Be able to recognize and predict opportunistic behaviors and instant gratification.
    • Evaluate the ingredients in processed food and in fast food restaurants, and apply this knowledge to one’s own eating behavior.
    • Critically analyze the contributions of genes, individual life choices, and culture on health outcomes (e.g., cancer risk, diabetes, and obesity).
    • Record behaviors in one’s eating pattern and deduce the negative and positive ones.  
    • Outline approaches to the management of natural and labor resources in various settings: Tiwanaku, Machu Picchu, Bali, Bolivia.
    • Analyze survival strategies in calorie restricted hypoxic environment (Bolivia, 13000 ft.)
    • Evaluate how biology and physiology can be negatively affected by food technology locally and internationally (thrifty genotype/diabetes/
    • Obesity.)

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/2/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
  • IDS 354 - Bedlam to Bellevue - On Being “Mad” in the US from 1960 to Present


    Description:
    An exploration of important developments in the treatment of mental health, focusing on the years between 1960 and today. Political decisions, advances in medication, changes in institutionalization, and individual experiences of mental illness are examined.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Generate a timeline of the important events in mental health care over the last 60 years and determine how those milestones have created the framework of our current mental health care system.
    • Reflect on the stigma of madness in the mid-twentieth century to the stigma of the present and determine how changes in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual have impacted public views on mental health.
    • Design a timeline of pharmacological and psychological treatment regimens for a student-selected diagnosis and discuss how the changes at each major point in time impacted the individual experience, as well as hypothesize future trends.
    • Reflect on the way that modern society views heinous events (e.g., mass shootings) and determine at what point in history we changed from judging such acts as “evil” and began to focus on the perpetrators’ diagnoses of mental illness or contributing psychological factors.
    • Create a timeline for one diagnosis, exploring the optimal  psychological and pharmacological treatment of each era, the public perception of the diagnosis, and the way that individuals accessed treatment.
    • Differentiate between the lived experience of three individuals with the same diagnosis during three different eras, and integrate their shared experiences into a single analysis of how diagnosis and institutionalization impacted their mental state, their physical well being, their relationships with others, and their ability to return to the world.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/27/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Summer Locations: Online
  
  • IDS 357 - Race, Drugs and Prohibition in the U.S.: What Makes Drug Use Criminal?


    Description:
    Marijuana, cocaine, coffee and sugar. Why are some drugs “good” and some “bad?” Explore the “Drug War,” motivations for regulation, current dilemmas and social justice implications in the United States, from an interdisciplinary approach. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

     

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K6 - Individual & Society

    General Education Pathways: P1 Civic & Community Engagement, P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the basic principles and ideologies that underlie drug regulation in the U.S., as well as the institutions that support and promote regulation.
    • Distinguish between social, political, economic, health and moral motivations for drug regulation.
    • Identify and distinguish common assumptions about drug use/abuse and explain how they inform social attitudes about drugs and the people who use them.
    • Evaluate the pros and cons of a specific ideology that informs U.S. drug policy, and assess whether this ideological approach guides regulations towards productive or counterproductive outcomes. 
    • Analyze how social attitudes help shape drug regulation and how existing social inequalities inform enforcement.
    • Articulate ways that race, class, and gender might influence individual attitudes about drug use, abuse, and regulatory enforcement.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/21/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
  • IDS 363 - The Simpsons: Social Institutions and National Community


    Description:
    The television show, “The Simpsons”, students will gain an understanding of the major themes and concepts that structure life for the members of the pluralistic American community.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Gain an understanding and appreciation of the pluralistic American community.
    • Critically examine the role of informed citizen and leader in the United States of America.
    • Conduct research and inquiry in the major themes and concepts structuring American life.
    • Use evidence to develop and evaluate positions on topics covered in the class, including historical, political, literary and cultural perspectives.
    • Make plausible interpretations and express informed opinions about topics covered in the class.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/7/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 369 - Living Voices of America: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Indigenous Women in the U.S.


    Description:
    This course will focus on Indigenous women in the United States from past to present day. There will be extensive coverage of Indigenous women’s daily roles and lives, including socialization, colonization, and social service issues. The course will also focus on methods of decolonization.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: ANTH 130 or PSY 101 or SOC 107 or SOC 301 or WGS 201 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine Indigenous women’s roles in historical, cultural, and regional contexts in the U.S.
    • Investigate the ways that traditional knowledges and cultures have shaped Indigenous women’s identities and will consider the alliances that Indigenous women have built across national geographies.
    • Explore gender issues within Indigenous communities, focusing on the effects of legislation on Indigenous women’s roles and the impact of colonization on gender practices.
    • Examine colonization through the prisms of Indigenous women’s life experience, exploring colonization issues and methods of decolonization.
    • Explore the role of social service organizations in the lives of Indigenous women in the United States.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/21/2016

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 373 - The Purpose of the United States


    Description:
    Is the United States just another country, acting in its own national interest? Or does the United States have some long term global purpose? This course analyzes patterns in the American experience to answer these questions.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Discuss the connection between expanding democracy within the United States and increasing democracy in the rest of the world.
    • Discuss the cultural differences between collectivism and individualism, and the United States role in increasing global individualism and decreasing global collectivism.
    • Discuss the connection between Great Britain’s global role between 1815 and 1914 and the United States global role between 1941 and the present.
    • Discuss the United States role in establishing free market economies in other countries.
    • Understand the interaction of culture, economics, politics and demographic and sociological trends in the development of democracy.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/7/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 389 - Academic and Career Exploration


    Description:
    This course leads IDS-social sciences students in the development of a career/graduate school plan. Students will investigate the work world and/or graduate schools in terms of their academic and personal goals. Students will modify their IDS 289 program.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IDS 289 and junior status or above.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explore the relationship between personal characteristics, e.g., interests, values and skills, influence career development.
    • Use a variety of resources to explore academic and occupational options.
    • Develop an individual career/academic plan.
    • Build a career or graduate school portfolio.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/5/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 405 - Essentials of Project Funding in the Social Sciences


    Description:
    Students enrolled in this course will be introduced to essentials of project funding specific to the social sciences disciplines. Course topics include defining the purpose and identifying the need for funding, completing a needs assessment, and identifying funding resources. Students will be required to submit a funding proposal.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite:  B or higher in Academic Writing II.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define a problem or identify an opportunity for a funding.
    • Choose, assess and prioritize funding options.
    • Prepare a viable funding proposal solution, including goals, objectives, outcomes and evaluation techniques.
    • Propose a final and complete funding plan.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/6/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Online
  
  • IDS 416 - What did you mean by that? Exploring how differing interpretations can sabotage human interactions


    Description:
    In our increasingly connected world, humans interact more often, but face frequent misunderstandings. Class examines causes and offers effective techniques for overcoming misunderstandings, thereby increasing professional and personal interaction competencies.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (PSY 101 or SOC 107) and 10 upper division credits from IDS, PSY, and SOC.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Contrast various micro and macro influences, which shape individuals, looking at various behaviors, which can lead to misunderstandings.
    • Examine various grammatical forms in different languages and propose reasons for these differences, which at times can lead to misunderstandings.
    • Outline how gestures from citizens from various countries can play a role in misunderstandings.
    • Analyze the issues of pronunciation as possible contributors to misunderstandings.
    • Critically analyze the construction of a sentence and distinguish various meanings this sentence can transmit.
    • Evaluate non-verbal expressions within a culture and score these non-verbal expressions with feelings of the person being observed.  
    • Formulate and diagnose the ways a person understands a comment on their own level using cognitive filters, and how this can lead to biases.
    • Argue that people in front of you do not think like you do, or support the fact that the person may be thinking in a different way.
    • Predict how misunderstandings will increase through use of technology and assemble solutions to prevent this problem in the future.
    • Diagnose and design techniques to be aware of everyday examples of misunderstandings and techniques to prevent them.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/22/21

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Online Spring Locations: Online Summer Locations: Online
  
  • IDS 489 - Senior Portfolio Project


    Description:
    End-of-program assessment; preparation of comprehensive degree report and/or descriptive portfolio of project. Students must earn at least a C grade to pass this course. Students will enroll in IDS 489 no earlier that 2 quarters following successful completion of IDS 289. Instructor permission.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IDS 289, student will have completed a minimum of 165 credits, and admission to the Interdisciplinary Studies: Social Sciences major.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Assess one’s own progress toward the learning goals of interdisciplinary Studies - Social Sciences major and provides the university with program assessment feedback.
    • Prepare for academic or career future alternatives, job interview, and/or graduate school application
    • Integrate documents representing skills learned as an Interdisciplinary Studies - Social Sciences major.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/6/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized, contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. By permission. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 496 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • IDS 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

International Study (INTL)

  
  • INTL 110 - Agriculture


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • INTL 115 - Business or Management


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • INTL 120 - Education


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • INTL 125 - Engineering


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • INTL 130 - Fine or Applied Arts


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • INTL 135 - Foreign Languages


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • INTL 140 - Health Sciences


    Description:
    May be repeated for credit under different subtitle. Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • INTL 145 - Humanities


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • INTL 150 - Law


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • INTL 155 - Math or Computer Sciences


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
 

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