Jun 20, 2024  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Courses numbered from 101–299 are lower-division courses, primarily for freshmen and sophomores; those numbered from 300–499 are upper-division courses, primarily for juniors and seniors. The numbers 296, 396, 496, and 596 designate individual study courses and are available for registration by prior arrangement with the course instructor and approval of the department chair.

The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the amount of credit each course carries. Variable credit courses include the minimum and maximum number of the credits within parentheses.

Not all of the courses are offered every quarter. Final confirmation of courses to be offered, information on new courses and programs, as well as a list of hours, instructor, titles of courses and places of class meetings, is available online in My CWU which can be accessed through the the CWU home page, and go to www.cwu.edu/registrar/course-information

 

Film (FILM)

  
  • FILM 250 - Introduction to Film


    Description:
    Learning and applying motion picture vocabulary and aesthetic concepts through screenings, discussions, and writing. Emphasis on the social context, cultural influences, and aesthetic qualities of film.Intended for film majors and minors. AH-Aesthetic Experience (W). Formerly FVS 250, students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: Academic Writing I and Academic Writing II with a grade of C- or higher, or permission of instructor.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: AH-Aesthetic Experience (W)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recall Influence of historical movements in cinema on contemporary cinema.
    • Define and distinguish between approaches to narrative structure.
    • Name conventions of major and hybrid film genres.
    • Recognize techniques of mlse-en-scene and cinematography.
    • Recognize techniques of editing and sound design.
    • Recall the phases and positions employed in the creation, production, completion, and distribution of a film.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 256 - Sound and Mixing - Aesthetics and Essentials


    Description:
    Students will gain an understanding of how to mix on a digital console. Audio/sound aesthetics and fundamentals will also be the focus of this course. FILM 256 and TH 256 are cross-listed; students may not receive credit for both. Formerly FVS 256, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate competency on a digital and analog mixing board
    • Display an ability to mix a multi-source input into a coherent and fluid mix.
    • Display fundamental skills on how to maintain and dress microphones on an actor
    • Display basic audio connection and hardware skills.
    • Demonstrate the ability to successfully mix live microphones.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/31/16

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 267 - Screenwriting Fundamentals


    Description:
    Introduction to the basic script format, the creative story and style elements, and the writing process steps for screenplays and teleplays. Focus on the narrative script development process from idea conception to first draft. COM 321 recommended. FILM 267 and ENG 267 are cross-listed courses, students may not receive credit for both. Formerly COM 267; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: ENG 102 or FILM 250.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recall and apply correct grammar, punctuation, spelling, and format for narrative screenplays.
    • Evaluate a feature script for quality of story, characters, and style and compose a “coverage” document.
    • Practice using screenplay writing style and story elements on a story from another medium.
    • Propose a concept for an original short screenplay.
    • Compose an original short screenplay.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/18/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 298 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 327 - Scriptwriter in Development and Production


    Description:
    Combined lecture/workshop, overview of the creative, and collaborative responsibilities expected of a scriptwriter in development and production. Students explore the challenges of this profession, as well as solutions to typical problems. Formerly COM 327; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: ENG 267 or FILM 267 and admission to the communication or film major.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Compose and present a narrative production “pitch” (proposal).
    • Compose and present a corporate or promotional production “pitch” (proposal).
    • Use industry-based communication strategies in a development and production setting.
    • Recall and apply legal and ethical considerations relating to a writer’s responsibilities and rights in development and production contexts.
    • Assemble and present a portfolio of self-marketing and business relationships and demonstrate interpersonal and self-promoting skills.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/18/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 330 - Media Aesthetics (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    An examination of the major aesthetic elements involved in visual storytelling for film, including light, color, 2D and 3D space, time/motion, and sound. Formerly COM 330; students may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize the major media aesthetic elements.
    • Analyze how aesthetic principles are used by directors and/or cinematographers to contribute to a film’s  diegesis.
    • Create an original visual production or a research paper using major aesthetic  elements.
    • Produce an effective non- narrative media message using aesthetic techniques.
    • Analyze ethical considerations in the creation of media messages.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/04/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 337 - Documentary Scriptwriting (Put on reserve 9/16/18)


    Description:
    Introduction to the format, story and style elements for documentary film. Topics include narrative point-of-view, story structure, camera placement, interviewer presence, narration and voice-over commentary, re-enactment and archival materials. Formerly COM 337; students may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern. (Put on reserve 9/16/18, will go inactive 8/24/21)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: FILM 267 or ENG 267 and admission to the communication or film major.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Ability to identify and explain the different types of documentary narratives.
    • Describe and explain the significance of the story structure choices, and visual and aural design elements, for a documentary.
    • Identify and apply the correct and specific script and semi script formats for documentaries.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/05/11

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 340 - Production I: Filmmaking Fundamentals


    Description:
    A combined lecture and skills course that introduces students to principles and techniques of single-camera production for narrative and documentary film. Courses in the Production sequence (Production I - VI) may not be taken simultaneously.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and correctly use basic film production equipment.
    • Demonstrate fundamental visual story knowledge using single camera production methods.
    • Prepare pre-production materials for a single camera production.
    • Demonstrate appropriate image composition, audio recording, and operational functions of both camera and audio equipment.
    • Assemble raw production footage into a coherent story and properly export completed projects while utilizing professional video editing software.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 342 - Early American Film History


    Description:
    A history of the development of narrative film as an art form and cultural medium from the 1800s to the mid-20th century, with primary focus on Hollywood cinema.  FILM 342 and ENG 342 are cross-listed courses; student may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Synthesize and demonstrate mastery of the origins of American film, and its stylistic, thematic, cultural and aesthetic evolution from early silent cinema through the films of the mid-20th century.
    • Analyze the ways in which American cinema both reflects and shapes national values and mores.  
    • Evaluate the role and importance of the Hollywood studio system and the notion of stardom from their early manifestations to the mid-20th century.
    • Articulate evolution of film technology from silent cinema to mid-century motion picture techniques.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 343 - Modern American Film History


    Description:
    A history of the development of narrative film as an art form and cultural medium from approximately 1960 to the present, with primary focus on Hollywood cinema.  FILM 343 and ENG 343 are cross-listed courses; student may not receive credit for both. Formerly COM 353; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Synthesize and demonstrate mastery of the evolving major trends, styles, themes, directorial schools, and cultural thrust of American film from mid-20th century to the present.
    • Analyze the ways in which post-mid-20th century American cinema both mirrors and molds national values and ideological precepts.
    • Analyze the ways in which the studio system, the star system, the media, and other forces related to the industry impact cinematic output after mid-20th century.
    • Summarize the major developments in cinema technology since mid-20th century.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 344 - Film Theory


    Description:
    A focused study of the major theories of cinema and the approaches and practice of film criticism. FILM 344 and ENG 344 are cross-listed courses; a student may not recieve credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FILM 250.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Distinguish between the major film theories and critical approaches
    • Utilize key filmic terminology and critical vocabulary.
    • Assess major theoretical and critical practices as they relate to a body of film.
    • Write professional quality film reviews and analyses.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 350 - Production II: The Film Set


    Description:
    A lecture and practical application course that introduces students to single-camera film set procedures and protocol, while continuing to advance technical skills. Courses in the Production sequence (I - VI) may not be taken simultaneously.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: FILM 250 and FILM 340.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and describe standard film set positions and set etiquette.
    • Perform the duties of various positions on the set, including director, assistant director, director of photography, assistant camera, grip and electric, and audio recording.
    • Demonstrate appropriate use of camera, lighting, and audio equipment.
    • Perform post-production duties for a narrative film project.
    • Analyze and critique personal work and the work of other students.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 354 - History of Television


    Description:
    Historical survey of television as an entertainment, information, and art medium. Emphasis on understanding the cultural, social, political, technological, and economic conditions of production; the examination of television as text itself; and TV’s impact on audiences. FILM 354 and ENG 354 are cross-listed courses, students may not receive credit for both. Formerly COM 354; students may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: either COM 201 or FILM 250.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Relate the historical evolution of television as an institution and as a technological and social force in American society.
    • Develop a critical approach for examining the historical evolution of television in America.
    • Ability to juxtapose the historical development of television industry, technology and/or programming with the social context of production.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of how the chronological development of television as a technology and an industry has become a part of American history and, how TV has shaped history and our sense of it.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/09/06

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 355 - History of Documentary (Put on reserve 9/16/19)


    Description:
    Survey of documentary history from 1895 to present. Focus on philosophy of documentary approach, overview of the most important topics and issues, and development of critical standards in the genre. FILM 355 and ENG 355 are cross-listed courses; students may not receive credit for both. Formerly COM 355; students may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern. (Put on reserve 9/16/19, will go inactive 8/24/22)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: either COM 201 or FILM 250.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Trace the development of documentary from its origins in primitive cinema through its changes and applications in reaction to domestic and world events and to technological developments.
    • Develop a critical approach for examining the historical evolution of the documentary genre
    • Ability to juxtapose the historical development of documentary film/video, technology and/or content/subject matter with the social context of production.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of how the chronological development of documentary as a genre and a mode of expression has become a part of societal commentary and how documentary has shaped our sense of ourselves and the “other.”
    • Identify and address questions germane to the field, including the distinction between fiction and nonfiction, the creation of truth and truths and the power relationships between documentarians and their subjects.
    • Identify and address questions germane to the field, including the formal components used in (re)constructing reality, and documentary’s overall impact on history and culture.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/15/05

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 356 - Writing for Screen Genre


    Description:
    An introduction to the story, style, and comedic or dramatic elements that distinguish major genres. Also explores the role of genre in the Hollywood production system, and the impact of genre on the viewing public as assessed by critical theories. Formerly COM 356; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: FILM 267 or ENG 267 and admission to the communication or film major.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the specific features of the different types of genre and hybrid genre.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the nature of drama and its use in various genres.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the nature of comedy and its use in various genres.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the role of genre in the Hollywood production system.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the impact of genre on the viewing public according to critical theories.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/17/11

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 357 - Writing for Serial Media


    Description:
    Scriptwriting for the basic genres of serial television and the web. Includes study of serial script, structure, story, character development, and dialog. FILM 357 and ENG 357 are cross-listed courses, students may not receive credit for both. Formerly COM 357; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: FILM 267 or ENG 267 and admission to the communication, English professional and creative writing, or film major.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recall and apply proper spelling, grammar, punctuation, and format for single-camera and multi-camera television scripts.
    • Evaluate and summarize strengths and weaknesses of a television pilot script.
    • Analyze a comedy program for story, characters, and style, and write a “spec” scene to be used in that program.
    • Analyze a dramatic program for story, characters, style, and emotional through-line, and write a “spec” scene to be used in that program.
    • Propose and pitch a concept for an original web series.
    • Write an episode for an original web series.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/18/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 360 - Survey of World Cinema


    Description:
    An overview of world cinema, with attention to the national film cultures of important film-producing countries (such as India, France, Japan), and a comparison of international films with mainstream Hollywood cinema. FILM 360 and ENG 360 are cross-listed courses; a student may not recieve credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FILM 250.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine major styles, trends, themes, and directors of a range of world cinematic cultures. 
    • Compare particular representative films from each of those countries.
    • Evaluate how such films represent a window into the cultures that produced them.
    • Summarize the ways various international filmmakers both utilize and challenge the traditions and aesthetic patterns of Hollywood film.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 380 - Production III: Narrative Short Films


    Description:
    An intensive hands-on course offering students the opportunity to apply knowledge gained in earlier production courses through the creation of short films. Courses in the Production sequence (I - VI) may not be taken simultaneously.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: FILM 216 and FILM 250 and FILM 350 and (FILM 267 or ENG 267). Co- or prerequisite: FILM 344 or ENG 344.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Shoot and edit production exercises to demonstrate a fundamental understanding of equipment and process.
    • Prepare a script for production according to industry standards.
    • Outline and organize all aspects of pre-production for the prepared script, including casting, auditions, location scouts, rehearsals, and production meetings.
    • Create a 4-8 minute short film.
    • Evaluate films created in class and offer a critical analysis.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 422 - Advanced Multi-Camera Production (Put on reserve 9/16/19)


    Description:
    The creative use of multi-camera techniques for studio and remote productions. Emphasis on directing, advanced lighting techniques, sound design, graphics, and remote truck equipment. Focus on dramatic formats, magazine-style, and large event productions. Formerly COM 422; students may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern. (Put on reserve 9/16/19, will go inactive 8/24/22)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: COM 322 and admission to either the communication studies, public relations, film, or journalism major.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine aesthetic principles of complex studio productions.
    • Create a pre-production plan for complex studio productions.
    • Outline directing techniques for a program-length magazine-style studio production.
    • Design the shot list for a multi-camera narrative production.
    • Create and defend a lighting ground plan for a studio production.
    • Assemble completed shows through post-production applications, and appraise own and others’ work.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/18/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 430 - Cinematography


    Description:
    Combined lecture and intensive, hands-on camera and lighting skills course focused on the art and technique of cinematic composition; technical emphasis on lighting equipment and strategies, camera systems and operation, distinctions between film and digital formats, and the cinematographer’s aesthetic contribution to the story. Formerly COM 430; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FILM 380.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Appropriately employ and discriminate amongst various lens, camera, and support system options
    • Demonstrate complex visual messaging through application of camera, lens, and support system mastery. 
    • Construct a standard methodology for approaching lighting design and composition.
    • Formulate and begin to define one’s own artistic visual style.
    • Diagnose and defend the efficacy of various approaches (technical and conceptual) to visual storytelling. 

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/18/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 431 - Editing


    Description:
    Concepts, and techniques of telling cinematic stories through editing. Hands-on learning by editing diverse scenes. Combination of lecture and skills application. Formerly COM 431; students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Pre or Co-requisite: FILM 350.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Construct a dramatic narrative scene or short film that displays the qualities of traditional continuity-style editing.
    • Construct a documentary scene or short film, employing techniques of documentary editing.
    • Construct a comedy scene or short film that displays the qualities of narrative editing for comedy.
    • Construct an action scene or short film that displays the qualities of narrative editing for action.
    • Construct a scene or short film that displays a non-linear, discontinuity editing approach.
    • Revise a previously edited scene or short film, or present for critique a rough cut of a current production course project.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 432 - Directing


    Description:
    Examines director’s role and responsibilities, process of translating the written word into image and action; basics of camera-actor blocking; editing dialogue scenes; organizing production venues and logistics of in-studio and on-location programs. Combined lecture/workshop. Formerly COM 432; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FILM 380.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Examine the role of the director in film and television production, including the relationships between the director and other department heads.
    • Assemble a production team and perform the role of the director on set.
    • Manage and direct actors in auditions, rehearsals, and on the set.
    • Defend a narrative blueprint and aesthetic vision for one or more films.
    • Direct a final exercise that synthesizes the skills developed through the quarter.
    • Evaluate and offer critique of other students’ work.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/04/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 433 - Producing


    Description:
    Theory, discussion, and practical application of planning and management fundamentals during preproduction, production, and postproduction of narrative and/or documentary programs. Formerly COM 346 and FILM 346; a student may only receive credit for one.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FILM 350.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify terms and concepts needed to manage the production of a film or program from start to finish.
    • Solve problems in the management of a film or program production.
    • Deconstruct a film or program proposal.
    • Construct a stripboard for a narrative film or promotional program.
    • Design an accurate plan for scheduling and budgeting a narrative film or program.
    • Design an accurate plan for scheduling and budgeting a documentary production.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 440 - Production IV: Corporate Media


    Description:
    Conceptualization, design, and production of non-narrative media intended for clients. Projects may include promotional videos, commercials, PSAs, or music videos. Courses in the Production sequence (I - VI) may not be taken simultaneously. Formerly COM 440; students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FILM 380 and admission to the film major.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Prepare a business proposal for client-based film production.
    • Differentiate between different types of client-based film productions.
    • Solicit and manage a client-based film production.
    • Evaluate client-based films created in class and offer a critical analysis.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 447 - Narrative Screenwriting I (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    In-depth study of the theory and practice of developing a narrative screenplay. Topics include narratology, symbols and myths, cognition and storytelling, oral tradition and communication, theme, point-of-view, and voice. Formerly COM 447; students may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: FILM 267 or ENG 267 and admission to the communication, English professional and creative writing, or film major.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the effect of the manipulation of scene construction, cinematography and editing on the creation of narrative in screenplays and teleplays.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the effect of the manipulation of visual and aural continuity and discontinuity, temporal and spatial, on the creation of narrative in screenplays and teleplays.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the effect of the manipulation of semiotics (language, symbols, archetypes, mythic themes) on the creation of narrative in screenplays and teleplays.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the relationship between cognition and the creation and understanding of narratives.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the relationship between oral tradition and communication, and the creation of narrative and dialog in screenplays and teleplays.
    • Identify/explain & demonstrate the development of theme, point-of-view, authorial voice, characters and setting on the creation of narrative in screenplays and teleplays.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/15/11

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 450 - Production V: Documentary


    Description:
    Exploration of the creative and technical elements of documentary production. Hands-on application of techniques from concept through to final product. Courses in the Production sequence (I - VI) may not be taken simultaneously.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: FILM 440 and admission to the film major.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Compare and contrast different types of documentary films.
    • Prepare a research proposal for documentary film production.
    • Outline and organize all aspects of pre-production for a documentary film project. 
    • Create short films that demonstrate a fundamental understanding of documentary filmmaking.
    • Evaluate documentary films created in class and offer a critical analysis.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 452 - Applied Studio Production


    Description:
    Assist in producing newscasts, public affairs, and/or entertainment programs for Ellensburg Community Television, and KCWU-TV. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Formerly COM 452; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FILM 350.

    Credits: (1-2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Prepare and manage all necessary aspects of a live television production
    • Set up television studio lighting and audio schemes according to professional standards
    • Evaluate a produced show so as to determine and explain whether professional standards have been achieved

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/04/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 453 - Wildcat Films


    Description:
    Student-run production company producing primarily client-based work. WCF also serves as a student media outlet and liaison between the Film program and local community.  Executive positions open to advanced students. May be repeated up to 16 credits. Formerly COM 453; students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: FILM 350 and film major or film production minor status.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Conduct meetings and maintain professional correspondence with clients.
    • Create budget proposals and contracts and negotiate agreements with clients.
    • Perform duties of a lead producer on a client-based video production, or hold an elected executive position (advanced students only).
    • Perform a secondary role on a client-based production lead by a classmate.
    • Develop marketing materials and promotional events for Wildcat Films and the Film program as a whole.
    • Create a personal business and marketing plan for post-graduation freelance work.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 456 - Advanced Concepts in Sound for Film and Stage


    Description:
    Creation of sound content for film and stage via software tools. FILM 456 and TH 456 are cross-listed courses; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered on even numbered years (Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: TH 256 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply acquired skills to create a basic underscore for film and stage in a variety of formats.
    • Apply acquired skills to record original effects as well as locate and evaluate royalty-free basic Foley sound effects. 
    • Apply acquired skills to eliminate extraneous sounds from an audio recording. 
    • Apply acquired audio editing skills in the creation of sound collage work.
    • Apply acquired skills using digital audio workstation software to manipulate and create audio content.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/20/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 457 - Narrative Screenwriting II


    Description:
    Combined lecture/workshop providing in-depth study of the theory and practice of developing a screenplay and teleplay writing style. Topics include mood and tone, scene structure and description, gender, age, subgroup communication and dialog techniques, non-verbal communication, and rewriting. Formerly COM 457; students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: FILM 447 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate comprehension of the creation of mood and tone in narrative screenwriting
    • Demonstrate comprehension of the range of dialog techniques
    • Demonstrate comprehension of the differences in gender, age and sub-group communication styles.
    • Demonstrate comprehension of non-verbal communication techniques.
    • Demonstrate comprehension of good scene development and description.
    • Demonstrate comprehension of the skill of rewriting.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/20/14

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 460 - Advanced World Cinema


    Description:
    Building on the foundation of Survey of World Cinema, this course focuses on world cinema in the transnational age, exploring recent developments in film and how they reflect global concerns and cinematic movements. FILM 460 and ENG 460 are cross-listed courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FILM 360 or ENG 360.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Synthesize elements of one or more international film cultures, including historical evolution; aesthetic features; cultural, social and political influences; thematic explorations; and directorial schools and trends. 
    • Analyze and critique particular films that are representative of the relevant international cinema.
    • Assess trans-global impacts and the ongoing discourse with Hollywood cinema.
    • Estimate the impact of colonialism and post-colonial forces on world cinema.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 461 - Studies in Film and Culture


    Description:
    A critical examination of how American films both construct and appropriate images of American racial, ethnic, and cultural minorities and compares these constructions to those created by minority filmmakers. May be repeated for credit under different subtitles for up to 10 credits. FILM 461 and ENG 461 are cross-listed courses; a student may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Relate the history of a minority culture (the peoples of a specific race, ethnicity or culture) in film as subjects, actors and creators.
    • Analyze “film image” in stereotype formation and social constructs of “self” vs. “other.”
    • Critically examine the portrayal of a specific race, ethnicity or culture in film.
    • Juxtapose the dominant discourse of the minority culture with the emerging use of film by members of that culture as part of a larger struggle for “cultural relevance and survivance”
    • Critically discuss of how minority filmmakers & actors are reframing the discourse of film making.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/04/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 462 - Studies in Film and/or Television Genres


    Description:
    An examination of a film and/or television genre: history, aesthetics, cultural context, social significance, and critical methodologies. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.  FILM 462 and ENG 462 are cross-listed courses; student may not receive credit for both. May be repeated up to 10 credits. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FILM 250.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the theory of genre as it applies to film and/or television
    • Examine cinematic works/ television series of a single genre such as film noir, horror, animation, musical, etc.
    • Articulate an overview of the dominant stylistic, thematic, and ideological features of a cinematic or television genre.
    • Analyze, critically evaluate, and prepare critical reviews of films/TV series as characteristic of a specific genre.
    • Recognize and articulate the cultural and social contexts that shape film genres in various historical periods, including issues of diversity and gender, American national identity, and international perspectives

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/04/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 463 - Studies in the Film Auteur


    Description:
    In-depth examination of major cinematic works of an auteur director, such as Hitchcock, Chaplin, Kurosawa, W. Allen, Zhang Yimou, etc., with attention to major stylistic and thematic practices. May be repeated for credit under different subtitles.  FILM 463 and ENG 463 are cross-listed courses; students may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FILM 250.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Students gain understanding of the theory of auteurship and a broad overview of the set of major American and international auteur directors.
    • Students will gain a n overview of the dominant stylistic, thematic, and ideological features of the works of select major American  and  international auteur directors.
    • Students will gain an in-depth understanding of the cinematic works of a single auteur director such as Hitchcock, Kurosawa, Chabrol, John Ford, Zhang Yimou, Chaplin, Woody Allen, Bergman, etc.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/18/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 467 - Narrative Screenwriting III (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    Combined lecture/workshop providing in-depth study of the theory and practice of adaptations and alternative plots for screenplays and teleplays. Formerly COM 457, students may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: FILM 457 and admission to the English professional and creative writing or film majors.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the effect of the manipulation of scene construction, cinematography and editing on the creation of narrative in screenplays and teleplays.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the effect of the manipulation of visual and aural continuity and discontinuity, temporal and spatial, on the creation of narrative in screenplays and teleplays.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the effect of the manipulation of semiotics (language, symbols, archetypes, mythic themes) on the creation of narrative in screenplays and teleplays.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the relationship between cognition and the creation and understanding of narratives.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the relationship between oral tradition and communication, and the creation of narrative and dialog in screenplays and teleplays.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the development of theme, point-of-view, authorial voice, characters and setting on the creation of narrative in screenplays and teleplays.​

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 470 - The Writers’ Room


    Description:
    This repeatable workshop course helps students develop the skills, techniques, and work ethic of a professional screenwriter. Students will pitch ideas, create outlines, write and rewrite short screenplays, and critique the work of others. May be repeated up to 15 credits.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: (FILM 267 or ENG 267) and screenwriting minor status, or permission of instructor.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Develop and prepare potential story ideas.
    • Outline and prepare story ideas into beat-sheets and treatments according to industry standards.
    • Construct and present story pitches based on developed ideas.
    • Compose a film script that adheres to industry standards.
    • Assess and evaluate submitted scripts for story execution, character presentation, and thematic elements.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 479 - Advanced Pre-Production


    Description:
    Formation of teams and pre-production activities for final senior films. Department head assignments, script finalization, location scouting, auditions, development of a visual plan. To be taken in the quarter immediately prior to FILM 480. Permission by instructor.

    Prerequisites:
    Pre- or co-requisite: FILM 450.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Evaluate, revise, and finalize a script for a 10-20 minute film.
    • Form a production team and assign department head positions.
    • Evaluate potential locations and possible schedules.
    • Perform a detailed script breakdown and develop into a production design and previsualization plan.
    • Conduct preliminary auditions for lead roles.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 480 - Production VI: Advanced Short Films


    Description:
    Through creative participation in a substantial capstone film, students will demonstrate command of the fundamental principles learned in the Film program. Courses in the Production sequence (I - VI) may not be taken simultaneously.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: FILM 450 and FILM 479.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Perform film department head duties for a film of 10-20 minutes, from production through post-production and delivery.
    • Justify various creative choices during production and post-production.
    • Evaluate cuts at multiple stages and offer critical analyses.
    • Develop a marketing and exhibition plan, including an electronic press kit and printed poster.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • FILM 489 - Film Career Seminar


    Description:
    Students prepare end-of-major portfolios, demonstrating achievement of film program outcomes and skills appropriate to their specialization. Grade will either be S or U. Permission by instructor. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: film major status and instructor permission.

    Credits: (1)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Design a career strategy.
    • Select and compile a portfolio of work.
    • Assess performance and experience in film program.
    • Analyze and reflect strengths and weaknesses of film program.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/04/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    Practical experience in film-related careers. Individual contract field experience with business, industry, government, or non-profit organization. Requires a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: Film major status and permission of program director.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 491 - Workshop


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 492 - Practicum


    Description:
    Focused, practical application of classroom skills-sets to the production of film projects under faculty direction and/or supervision, and/or practice planning instruction, teaching and assessing learning in film-related course(s). May be repeated up to 6 credits. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: film major status and permission of program director.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Propose a film or script project.
    • Manage and lead a film production or develop a script, demonstrating professional practices that meet industry expectations. 
    • Students will appraise their own performance regarding personal motivation, reliability, and good judgment, as well as professional attitude and good communication skills
    • Student will present and receive criticism for a completed film production that meets deliverable requirements and receive criticism.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    6/01/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 496 - Individual Study


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FILM 499 - Seminar


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Finance (FIN)

  
  • FIN 101 - Financial Literacy


    Description:
    An introduction to financial concepts relevant to everyday savers.  Topics include stocks, bonds, indexes, mutual funds, the power of compounding, investing in stocks, valuation of stocks, behavioral finance, the effects of the macroeconomy on investments, and stock market valuation. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K8 - Science & Technology

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being, P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe how developments in finance have made markets more efficient and improved the functioning of the economy and returns for investors over time. (ST-1)
    • Recognize the ethical, economic, and social implications, and resultant political implications, of developments in finance. (ST-2)
    • Formulate questions relating to long term company value that can be assessed using financial analysis techniques. (ST-3)
    • Apply mathematical and quantitative reasoning to forecast future prospects of a company and assess overall investment worthiness. (ST-4) 
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of fundamental concepts within finance.  (WK-1)
    • Demonstrate knowledge of scholarly and creative methods used within finance.  (WK-2)
    • Demonstrate an understanding of conceptual financial models reflecting complex challenges and real-world issues.  (PCI-5)
    • Determine credibility of financial information sources and understand elements that might temper this credibility.  (PCI-6)
    • Develop approaches to address individual and/or societal financial health and financial well-being issues.  (HWB-4)
    • Appraise key financial factors and strategies that propagate an individual’s personal, social, and professional future well-being.  (HWB-6)

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 174 - Personal Finance


    Description:
    This course addresses the broad spectrum of financial issues encountered by individuals throughout their lives. Topics include but are not limited to: Preparing a personal budget, money management, investments, retirement planning, educational planning and insurance.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: a math placement test score resulting in placement into MATH 100C or successful completion of MATH 100B with a grade of C or higher.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: FYE3 - Quantitative Reasoning

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize the importance of analyzing everyday purchases and determine whether “on sale” goods or services are truly the best buy based on a comparison of the per unit cost or percent savings of similar goods and services.
    • Explain how to analyze, interpret and make decisions based on interest rate calculations, cost of credit calculations, investment fund options, insurance variables, budget analysis, savings, debt and financial goals.
    • Calculate percentages, fractions and ratios to analyze relationship between one’s income, expenses, assets, and liabilities.
    • Assemble basic statistical summaries, including mean, median, mode and range when analyzing various personal finance situations.
    • Explain the hidden costs of credit by interpreting the fine print on purchase agreements, or in credit card offers.
    • Evaluate investments options such making monthly investments versus one time investments, differing rates of return and time horizon affect the outcome of saving.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/6/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 298 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 370 - Introductory Financial Management


    Description:
    An introduction to financial decision making. Topics include financial statement analysis, time value of money, risk and return, securities valuation, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and capital structure.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (ACCT 251 and BUS 221 and ECON 201 and admission to a college of business major; or admission to a College of Business Graduate Program); or (ACCT 301 and BUS 221 and ECON 201 and admission to the bachelor of science, personal financial planning major or the bachelor of applied science in supply chain management major); or (admission to an actuarial science major who has completed ACCT 251 or ACCT 301 and ECON 201 and MATH 172 and MATH 173 and BUS 221 or MATH 211 with grades no lower than a C (2.0). MATH 211 may be taken concurrently.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Articulate basic financial concepts, markets, and institutions.
    • Analyze financial statements (financial statements and financial statements analysis).
    • Evaluate risk and return as they relate to interest rates, required rates of return, and weighted average cost of capital.
    • Compute and apply the time value of money.
    • Apply the valuation of financial securities: stocks and bonds.
    • Apply capital budgeting methods: capital budgeting.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/7/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg, Des Moines, Lynnwood Winter Locations: Ellensburg, Des Moines, Lynnwood Spring Locations: Ellensburg, Des Moines, Lynnwood
  
  • FIN 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 398 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 466 - Working Capital Management


    Description:
    Course covers the management of current assets and current liabilities, describes the nature and types of short-term credit instruments, and incorporates a significant use of Excel.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in FIN 370 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand a firm’s short-term financing alternatives and the various strategies it can use to fund its current and long-term assets.
    • Calculate various liquidity and solvency measures. They will be able to illustrate situations where a “profitable” firm can go bankrupt.
    • Understand the various inventory models that deal with the timing and amount of raw material inventory purchases. They will be able to calculate the “optimal” inventory and order quantity. They will also be aware of various accounting systems used to monitor inventory balances.
    • Evaluate a credit request and understand how various accounting systems and measurement techniques are used to monitor receivables balances. Students will also know how delinquent accounts should be handled and what alternatives a firm possesses to pursue past due accounts.
    • Understand how firms can make the decision to take a cash discount and will be able to calculate the optimal payment timing. Students will also understand how controlled disbursement and zero balance accounts can be used to lengthen the firm’s disbursement float.
    • Explain the positive and negative impacts of bank deregulation on the management of all the current accounts.
    • Calculate short-term, intermediate-term and long-term forecasts. Additionally, they will be able to determine financing needs based on their forecasts.
    • Evaluate the effectiveness of a lockbox and concentration banking system in reducing a firm’s collection float. Students will also understand the various financial models used to make the cash and securities allocation decision. Students will also be aware of the characteristics of the major short-term marketable securities.
    • Perform all calculations using spreadsheet cell formulas and built in functions. Students will also be able to create various types of graphs.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    02/05/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 470 - Intermediate Financial Management


    Description:
    A review, consolidation, and extension of the FIN 370 class. Additional focus on the theory, practice, and analysis of the firm’s investing and financing activities as these activities relate to the value creation process. Course will be offered every year (Fall and Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (a grade of C or higher in FIN 370 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25) Or (FIN 370 with a minimum grade of C AND declaration  of a Finance Minor) OR (FIN 370 with a minimum grade of C AND admission to an Actuarial Science major).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the importance of financial planning and capital utilization.
    • Discuss the inter-relationships between operating cash flow, financial planning and growth
    • Apply break even and/or what if analysis to consider capital budgeting problems.
    • Calculate the cost of capital for a company
    • Outline the processes companies can use to raise capital.
    • Discuss the relationship between risk and return
    • Summarize the basics of bankruptcy
    • Explain the role of dividends in corporate valuation
    • Prepare a cash budget and short term financial plan
    • Summarize the potential impact of foreign exchange rates on corporate investments

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/6/2017

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 474 - Personal Financial Planning


    Description:
    Introduction to full range of financial planning decisions, including: budgeting, investing, tax planning, risk management, employee benefits, retirement, and estate planning.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in FIN 370 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of all aspects of personal financial planning, including budgeting, credit management, investing and investment markets, tax planning, risk management, retirement planning and estate planning.
    • Demonstrate written communication skills.
    • Demonstrate awareness of ethics as it relates to financial planning and investments.
    • Demonstrate the ability to solve problems in financial planning using financial calculators and spreadsheets.
    • Demonstrate awareness of ethics as it relates to investment management and professional codes of conduct in the investment industry.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    02/05/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 475 - Investments


    Description:
    Principles of investment valuation. Topics include a survey of securities and securities markets, analysis of risk, expected return, timing, and selection of stocks and bonds in a portfolio context. Course will be offered on odd numbered years (Fall and Winter).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (a grade of C or higher in FIN 370 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25) OR FIN 370 and admission to the Bachelor of Science in Personal Financial Planning major AND completion of BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25) OR (FIN 370 with a minimum grade of C AND declaration  of a Finance Minor) OR (FIN 370 with a minimum grade of C AND admission to an Actuarial Science major).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the basic structure and function of financial markets
    • Design an investment portfolio that meets a defined objective regarding risk and return
    • Prepare a security analysis of a company
    • Compare the Efficient Market Hypothesis to behavioral financial theories.
    • Evaluate a financial statement to make an investment determination
    • Discuss the role of mutual funds as a means of investment
    • Summarize basic investment principles

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/6/2017

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 476 - Investment Industry Essentials


    Description:
    Covers key concepts and competencies that may be included in the Securities Industry Essentials® (SIE®) Exam.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FIN 475 or PFP 475 with a grade of C or higher or by department permission.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Differentiate between the purposes of various investment securities and vehicles.
    • Evaluate the appropriate investment security or vehicles given a stated objective.
    • Assign the appropriate federal, state and department regulations to an investment decision.
    • Describe the appropriate procedures employed to establish and maintain federal, state and department regulations for select securities.
    • Describe the role and application of fundamental, economic and market analyses for security investments.
    • Explain the distinctions between trading markets.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/22/21

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 477 - International Finance


    Description:
    Financial decision making in an international setting. Explores both traditional areas of finance and recent innovations in financial management from the perspective of the multinational corporation.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in FIN 370 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge in the principles and practices of financial management to international financial management.
    • Communicate effectively in written financial reports.
    • Demonstrate awareness of ethics and diversity as they relate to financial management in a global setting.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    02/05/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 493 - Finance Boot Camp


    Description:
    Supervised field experience seminar focused on finance related organizations and processes. On-location industry engagement. Education, training, and business skills application in industry setting. Grade will either be S or U. Permission of instructor. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Prepare a research brief on each organization participating in the boot camp
    • Exhibit professional behavior and appropriate business skills in industry setting.
    • Establish a professional network within the industry professionals
    • Illustrate an awareness of the organization(s) participating in the boot camp.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 496 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 498 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FIN 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

French (FR)

  
  • FR 151 - First-year French


    Description:
    Conversational approach with intensive oral-aural drill. Firm foundation in the basic structural principles of the language. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 152 - First-year French


    Description:
    Conversational approach with intensive oral-aural drill. Firm foundation in the basic structural principles of the language. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 151.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 153 - First-year French


    Description:
    Conversational approach with intensive oral-aural drill. Firm foundation in the basic structural principles of the language. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 152.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 200 - Introduction to French Culture


    Description:
    This course examines major historical events, social movements, and debates that situate contemporary French culture in historical perspective through a variety of cultural artifacts. Taught in English. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K2 - Community, Culture, & Citizenship

    General Education Pathways: P1 Civic & Community Engagement, P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe how historical and socio-cultural developments in France such as the Revolution and colonial occupation have affected minority and majority communities and informed competing notions of citizenship and evolving political structures and practices.
    • Describe and evaluate sociocultural diversity in contemporary French culture and explain how culturally diverse experiences create value within French society; use critical thinking to explain why certain quarters of the society fail to value France’s religious and cultural diversity.
    • Apply critical thinking in order to analyze the ways in which equality and inequality are institutionalized in France’s socio-political, economic, and/or organizational structures.
    • Identify and describe a number of French social movements and explain the importance of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and class in relation to these social movements (how they inform both social justice movements and their ethnic nationalist counterparts).
    • Describe and analyze local-to-global dynamics as they shape contemporary French culture within the broader context of interdependent global systems today.
    • Compare and critically assess relationships between French models of citizenship to American models (compare and contrast what an informed citizen looks like in each model); and then explain in turn how these models are informed by historical, economic, cultural, economic, and political forces and processes.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/18/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 201 - Appreciation of French Cuisine


    Description:
    Appreciation of French cuisine through the aesthetic theories of French gastronomy, in-class tastings, and consideration of French culture, history, and dietary habits. Taught in English. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K3 - Creative Expression

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe and evaluate the qualities of French cuisine accurately using the appropriate aesthetic and cultural terminology
    • Identify techniques used in French cuisine and explain the value of these techniques in achieving an aesthetically elevated product
    • Relate French cuisine to French culture and history and to evolving French aesthetic norms and traditions from the 19th century to the present
    • Distinguish and explain the differences among divergent views and approaches to French cuisine in terms of regional, social class, and religious (among other) differences
    • Apply aesthetic judgement and critical thinking by tasting and using appropriate vocabulary to evaluate/describe flavor profiles, textures, cooking techniques, etc.
    • Identify and critically assess connections between dietary habits, cultural norms governing food and drink, and individual and societal health
    • Identify and evaluate ways in which the relationship between personal, social, professional, and economic well-being is tied to (and expressed by) dietary habits and cultural norms governing food and drink

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/18/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 251 - Second-year French


    Description:
    Thorough review of French grammar and graduated readings in modern French prose with discussions conducted in French. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 252 - Second-year French


    Description:
    Thorough review of French grammar and graduated readings in modern French prose with discussions conducted in French. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 251.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 253 - Second-year French


    Description:
    Thorough review of French grammar and graduated readings in modern French prose with discussions conducted in French. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 252.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 298 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 301 - Introduction to French Literature (Put on reserve 9/16/19)


    Description:
    This course is designed as a transition course to prepare students for the advanced literature courses. Appreciation of literature and methods of analysis will be taught on a basic level through the careful examination of specific texts. (Put on reserve 9/16/19, will go inactive 8/24/22)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (3)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 351 - French Civilization I: Institutions and Revolutions


    Description:
    An exploration of key historical events; intellectual, artistic, and social movements; and individuals that have shaped continental French culture from the Middle Ages to the present. Thematic emphasis on institutions and revolutions.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe major historical events, institutions, and social movements in continental France from the Middle Ages to the present in the target language.
    • Identify major intellectual movements and key individuals in French literature, philosophy, plastic arts, and music and relate them to key French institutions and revolutions.
    • Identify salient aspects of the historical development of the French language from the pre-Roman era to the present.
    • Read a French history text book and literary works written in French that address key French institutions and revolutions and summarize these works in appropriate written French.
    • Identify the main points and/or summarize the basic argument of authentic video recordings in French in appropriate written French.
    • Use spoken French to describe and evaluate a limited selection of cultural artifacts within their historical context in an organized and comprehensible manner to peers.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/21/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 352 - French Civilization II: Communities, Beliefs and Identities (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    An exploration of key historical events; intellectual, artistic, and social movements; and individuals that have shaped continental French culture from the Middle Ages to the present. Thematic emphasis on communities, beliefs, and identities. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe major historical events, institutions, and social movements in continental France from the Middle Ages to the present in the target language.
    • Identify major intellectual movements and key individuals in French literature, philosophy, plastic arts, and music with attention to how they relate to communities, beliefs, and identities
    • Identify salient aspects of the historical development of the French language from the pre-Roman era to the present.
    • Read a French history text book  and literary works written in French that address the formation of communities, beliefs, and identities and summarize these works in appropriate written French.
    • Identify the main points and/or summarize the basic argument of authentic video recordings in French in appropriate written French.
    • Use spoken French to describe and evaluate a limited selection of cultural artifacts within their historical context in an organized and comprehensible manner to peers.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/21/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 353 - French Civilization III: Contemporary France


    Description:
    An overview of contemporary French culture through readings and viewings of French media with emphasis on topics such as immigration, religion, globalization, and politics of the family.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Outline the basic lineaments of social issues unique to contemporary French society such as immigration, religion, globalization, and politics of the family.
    • Identify and characterize major French media (including newspapers, television shows, social media outlets, and magazines) in regards to their treatment of contemporary social issues.
    • Acquire a basic level of socio-linguistic awareness concerning the French spoken by minority and youth communities in France today.
    • Read French newspapers and other contemporary print and online media written in French and summarize these works in appropriate written French.
    • Identify the main points and/or summarize the basic argument of authentic video recordings in French in appropriate written French.
    • Use spoken French to describe and evaluate a limited selection of cultural artifacts within their historical context in an organized and comprehensible manner to their peers.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/17/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 361 - Francophone World I: Africa, Caribbean, Indian Ocean


    Description:
    A survey of the history and cultures of the French Speaking World from the colonial era to the present with a focus on francophone communities in Africa, the Caribbean, and the Indian Ocean.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe key historical events and social movements of French-speaking communities in the Caribbean, Africa and the Indian Ocean from the colonial era to the present.
    • Identify key intellectual and artistic movements and important individuals in the literature, plastic arts, and music of francophone African, Caribbean, and Indian Ocean cultures.
    • Identify salient linguistic and dialectal features of French and creoles spoken in francophone regions of Africa, the Caribbean, and the Indian Ocean.
    • Read French historical and cultural studies treatments of francophone African, Caribbean, and Indian Ocean cultures. Read literary works from these regions written in French, and summarize these works in appropriate written French.
    • IIdentify the main points and/or summarize the basic argument of authentic video recordings in French in appropriate written French.
    • Use spoken French to describe and evaluate a limited selection of cultural artifacts from francophone African, Caribbean, and Indian Ocean regions within their historical and cultural context in an organized and comprehensible manner to peers.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 362 - Francophone World II: North America, Southeast Asia, Pacific Region


    Description:
    A survey of the history and cultures of francophone Canada from the colonial era to the present. (Put on reserve 9/16/18, will go inactive 8/24/21)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe key historical events and social movements of French-speaking communities in the North America, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific from the colonial era to the present.
    • Identify key intellectual and artistic movements and important individuals in the literature, plastic arts, and music of francophone regions in North America, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific.
    • Identify salient linguistic and dialectal features of French and creoles spoken in francophone regions of North America, Southeast Asia, and the Pacific.
    • Read French historical and cultural studies treatments of francophone North American, Southeast Asian and Pacific cultures. Read literary works from these regions written in French, and summarize these works in appropriate written French.
    • Identify the main points and/or summarize the basic argument of authentic video recordings in French in appropriate written French.
    • Use spoken French to describe and evaluate a limited selection of cultural artifacts from francophone North American, Southeast Asian, and Pacific regions within their historical and cultural context in an organized and comprehensible manner to peers.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 363 - Cultures of Francophone Africa (Put on reserve 9/16/19)


    Description:
    A survey of the history and cultures of francophone Africa, including the Maghreb and Sub-Saharan Africa, from the colonial era to the present. (Put on reserve 9/16/19, will go inactive 8/24/22)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the broad historical development of francophone African cultures from the colonial era to the present.
    • Identify major movements and important people in the literature, plastic arts, and music of francophone African cultures.
    • Identify linguistic and dialectal particularities of francophone African cultures in broad terms.
    • Read French historical and anthropological treatments of francophone Africa, and literary works from the region written in French, and summarize these works in appropriate written French.
    • Identify the main points and/or summarize the basic argument of authentic video recordings in French in appropriate written French.
    • Use spoken French to describe and evaluate a limited selection of cultural artifacts from francophone Africa within their historical and cultural context in an organized and comprehensible manner to their peers.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/17/2014

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 380 - Topics in French Language, Literature and Culture


    Description:
    This course will offer different topics on a rotating basis: these topics will include French language (grammar and conversation), French and Francophone literature and cinema, and French and Francophone cultures. May be repeated up to 12 credits.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253 or by permission of instructor.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and correctly utilize advanced grammatical and morphological concepts in French
    • Express ideas on specific concepts orally and in well-organized compositions in French
    • Identify literary and cinematographic phenomena and terminology within the context of French and Francophone history and culture
    • Analyze French and Francophone literary texts and movies
    • Identify cultural traits specific to French and Francophone cultures and analyze them within an historical context
    • Analyze French and Francophone cultures and compare them to other cultures

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/1/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 384 - Defying Nazism: German and French Resistance during WWII


    Description:
    Course focuses on the Resistance movements in Germany and France as people from both countries struggled to come to terms with Hitler and Nazism. FR 384 and GERM 384 are cross-listed courses; a student may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and describe the ways in which beliefs and values affect interpretations of experiences and events.
    • Interpret the events experienced in France and Germany from WWI to WWII and compare them to similarly significant historical events.
    • Identify the causes of the German and French Resistance movements. 
    • Examine and explain the effects of the German and French Resistance movements on the government and citizens of each country.
    • Recognize the interrelatedness of human concerns that transcend geographical and cultural boundaries.
    • Identify and interpret the significance of salient cultural and historical details of resistance movements.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    Approved Fall 2017

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 460 - French Cinema (Put on reserve 9/16/18)


    Description:
    Students will view and analyze French films as a backdrop to the discussion of the history of French cinema. (Put on reserve 9/16/18, will go inactive 8/24/21)

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the major genre of French cinema and apply their individual characteristics to specific films shown in class.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/21/2004

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 491 - Workshop


    Description:
    May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  
  • FR 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • FR 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
 

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