Jan 31, 2023  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Courses numbered from 101–299 are lower-division courses, primarily for freshmen and sophomores; those numbered from 300–499 are upper-division courses, primarily for juniors and seniors. The numbers 296, 396, 496, and 596 designate individual study courses and are available for registration by prior arrangement with the course instructor and approval of the department chair.

The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the amount of credit each course carries. Variable credit courses include the minimum and maximum number of the credits within parentheses.

Not all of the courses are offered every quarter. Final confirmation of courses to be offered, information on new courses and programs, as well as a list of hours, instructor, titles of courses and places of class meetings, is available online in My CWU which can be accessed through the the CWU home page, and go to www.cwu.edu/registrar/course-information

 

Health and Physical Education (HPE)

  
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    HPE 398 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HPE 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HPE 443 - Sex, Drugs and Going Pro: Issues in Professional Sports


    Description:
    This course will provide students with an in-depth exploration of contemporary problems and scandals in professional sports so they can contemplate, assess and suggest methods for cultural change at the professional sports level. HPE 443 and HPE 543 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Research and define contemporary issues in professional sports.
    • Identify historical issues that led to, or may have led to, contemporary problems in professional sports.
    • Synthesize the historical and contemporary data about problems in professional sports and relate it to modern problems in interscholastic and intercollegiate sports.
    • Identify specific professional sport programs or policies that lead to problems and scandals.
    • Identify and recognize professional governing organizations and their programs for dealing with negative sports and personnel issues. Explore marketing trends to boost positive images.
    • Forecast future trends for professional sports that will be positive and negative for athletes who are “going pro” in the years to come.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/15/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HPE 444 - The Promise and Pitfalls in Interscholastic Athletic Programs


    Description:
    This course will provide students with an in-depth exploration of contemporary issues surrounding interscholastic athletics at the local, state and national levels. The student will contemplate and assess the critical issues in secondary school athletics and appraise possible solutions for specific case studies. HPE 444 and HPE 544 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define the general promises and pitfalls of interscholastic athletics.
    • Identify contemporary issues in interscholastic athletics at the local level.
    • Identify contemporary issues in interscholastic athletics at the state level.
    • Identify contemporary issues in interscholastic athletics at the national level.
    • Recognize local, state, and national organizations’ attempts at corrective actions for contemporary interscholastic athletic pitfalls.
    • Define, explore, and forecast the most critical issues in Interscholastic athletics and appraise contemporary solutions on a case-by-case focus.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/15/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HPE 445 - The Good, Bad and Ugly of Intercollegiate Sports


    Description:
    This course will provide students with an in-depth exploration of current positive and negative topics surrounding intercollegiate athletics. The students will contemplate and assess critical issues through historical and contemporary case studies. HPE 445 and HPE 545 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Research and define the current positive aspects of intercollegiate athletics.
    • Research and define the current negative aspects of intercollegiate athletics.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of general positive and negative aspects of intercollegiate athletics as looked at through local, state, and national purview.
    • Identify specific cases of positive and negative issues with intercollegiate athletics at the local level.
    • Identify specific policy in intercollegiate athletics at the state and national levels that will maintain positive trends.
    • Consider local, state, and nation trends with intercollegiate athletics and forecast how to head-off, or plan for, future negative impacts they will have on intercollegiate athletics.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/15/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HPE 496 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HPE 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HPE 498 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HPE 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

History (HIST)

  
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    HIST 101 - World History to 1500


    Description:
    Origins and development of the major world civilizations to the 15th century. A comparative study of their political, social, and economic institutions, and their religious and intellectual backgrounds. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring). SB-Perspectives on World Cultures (W).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: SB-Perspectives on World Cultures (W). K4 - Global Dynamics

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being, P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

     

    • Identify key events, persons, movements, and concepts in the world from pre-history to 1500
    • Develop ability to identify, analyze, and evaluate the relationship between past and present with respect to global, national, and local issues from prehistory to 1500
    • Demonstrate an understanding of how diversity, inequality or privilege interact with social, economic, cultural, technological, and political powers in world history to 1500
    • Demonstrate an understanding of how world history to 1500 informs strategic decision making, global citizenship and economic productivity
    • Effectively address significant historical issues and articulate impacts on global issues by  clearly and coherently presenting ideas in writing and speaking
    • Apply historical knowledge and critical thinking skills in analyzing sources concerning world history to 1500 and address complex global problems

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/16/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
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    HIST 102 - World History: 1500-1815


    Description:
    A comparative survey of political, social, economic, and cultural developments in world history from 1500-1815. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer). SB-Perspectives on World Cultures (W).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: SB-Perspectives on World Cultures (W). K5 - Humanities

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being, P5 Sustainability, P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
     

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Read and respond in oral and written form to primary sources from different parts of the world, understanding the importance of author and audience to the production and reception of those sources.
    • Identify and synthesize patterns in world history that are reflected in our current world, making connections between past and present.
    • Recognize and analyze the significance of power dynamics and experiences to interpretations of human experience.
    • Identify and challenge preconceived notions in the context of alternative perspectives and experiences.
    • Analyze the ways in which historically distinct cultural contexts shaped individuals’ lives, beliefs, and experiences, and how these are different from our own.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/17/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
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    HIST 103 - World History Since 1815


    Description:
    A comparative survey of political, social, economic, and cultural developments in world history since 1815. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer). SB-Perspectives on World Cultures (W).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: SB-Perspectives on World Cultures (W). K4 - Global Dynamics

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

     

    • Develop ability to identify, analyze and evaluate the relationship between past and present with respect to global, national and local issues from 1815 to present

    • Recognize and evaluate global diversity and inequality in the context of social, economic and political power across time and space
    • Demonstrate an understanding of how world history informs strategic decision making, global citizenship and economic productivity

    • Develop an ability to articulate the global dimensions of significant issues in the past and present, whether social, cultural, economic, historic, or political

    • Apply critical thinking skills to historical sources to analyze global issues from multiple perspectives and conceptual models, including cultural, economic, social and political
    • Assemble, evaluate and analyze relevant historical evidence in order to craft well-supported arguments orally and in writing

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/17/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
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    HIST 143 - United States History to 1865


    Description:
    Survey of U.S. history from before contact to Civil War. Themes include pre-Columbian societies; colonization; epidemics and environmental change; slavery; the American Revolution and Constitution; the market revolution; Manifest Destiny; and the Civil War. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer). SB-Perspectives on Cultures and Experiences of U.S. (W).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: SB-Perspectives on Cultures and Experiences of U.S. (W). K2 - Community, Culture, & Citizenship

    General Education Pathways: P2 Health & Well-being, P5 Sustainability

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and evaluate the historical origins and interplay of class, gender, and race in the U.S. to 1865
    • Identify and evaluate the historical origins and impact of nationalism and expansionism in the United States to 1865
    • Demonstrate understanding of how the American past (to 1865) has shaped the present
    • Demonstrate understanding of key elements of the U.S. Constitution, as well as the evolution and impact of key American reform movements, court decisions, legislation, and wars prior to 1866
    • Demonstrate understanding of how and why Americans resolved–or failed to resolve–common problems prior to 1866.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/21/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 144 - United States History Since 1865


    Description:
    U.S. history from Reconstruction to the present. Themes include Imperialism, Progressivism, World War I, Great Depression, World War II, the Civil Rights and Women’s Movements, the Vietnam War, recent U.S. foreign policy and political movements. SB-Perspectives on Cultures and Experiences of U.S. (W).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: SB-Perspectives on Cultures and Experiences of U.S. (W). K2 - Community, Culture, & Citizenship

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and evaluate the origins and interplay of class, gender, and race in the United States since 1865
    • Identify and evaluate the origins and impact of nationalism and/or imperialism in the United States since 1865
    • Demonstrate understanding of how the American past (since the Civil War) has shaped the present
    • Demonstrate understanding of key elements of the U.S. Constitution, as well as the evolution and impact of key American reform movements, court decisions, legislation, and wars since 1865
    • Demonstrate understanding of how and why Americans have resolved–or failed to resolve–common problems since 1865.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/21/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    HIST 298 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 301 - Pacific Northwest History


    Description:
    Exploration and settlement; subsequent political, economic, and social history with particular emphasis on Washington. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K5 - Humanities

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P5 Sustainability

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and explain the origins and consequences of the key events and transformations that occurred in the Pacific Northwest from the earliest recorded history to the present.
    • Read and respond in oral and written form to primary and secondary sources-including traditional historical documents, oral traditions, art, and literature-from the many cultures of the Pacific Northwest.
    • Identify and synthesize patterns over time in how regional inhabitants have understood, assigned meaning, utilized, and shaped the environment around them. 

    • Identify and assess the ways in which the history of the Pacific Northwest follows, contributes to, or departs from the larger contours of the American and global experience and, in so doing, confront and question their own presuppositions.
    • Assemble, evaluate and analyze relevant historical evidence in order to craft well-supported arguments in both oral and written form.
    • Recognize the nature of history as an interpretive process, rather than merely as a body of facts.  Armed with that recognition, and utilizing both primary and secondary sources, the student will be able to evaluate existing interpretations and to articulate their own interpretations.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/16/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 302 - Historical Methods


    Description:
    Exercises in historical research, critical analysis, and interpretation. Students must earn a minimum grade of C as a major requirement.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: Students must achieve a C- or higher in Academic Writing I prior to taking Academic Writing II.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K1 - Academic Writing II: Reasoning & Research

    General Education Pathways: P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze cause and effect relationships, bearing in mind multiple causation
    • Isolate and articulate patterns of historical continuity and change
    • Analyze and critique a historical argument, evaluating its rhetorical effectiveness and identifying its underlying assumptions
    • Isolate and evaluate the validity of the central question(s) and perspective(s) of different kinds of historical sources
    • Identify appropriate finding aids, primary, secondary, and tertiary materials in the library and online
    • Organize and synthesize evidence to support an original argument
    • Develop a focused historical assertion (thesis) and argument, addressing divergent stances on the topic
    • Write clearly and coherently, using different rhetorical strategies in a scholarly style to enhance meaning
    • Cite and document sources precisely and effectively according to Turabian guidelines
    • Give and receive constructive criticism

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    9/17/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg, Online Winter Locations: Ellensburg, Online Spring Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
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    HIST 309 - American History through Film (Put on reserve 9/16/18)


    Description:
    Explores American history through the prism of film, how film represents the past, how filmmakers, historians, and the general public understand cinematic history, and how film can be viewed as both primary and secondary sources. (Put on reserve 9/16/18, will go inactive 8/24/21)

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and analyze the various ways that film expresses historical content and meaning.
    • Utilize historical film as both primary and secondary historical sources.
    • Communicate historical ideas, in written and oral form, with precision and coherence.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/21/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 313 - History of Rome 500 B.C. to 500 A. D.


    Description:
    Beginning, city-state, republican period; world empire; decline.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 314 - Military History of the United States


    Description:
    A comprehensive and systematic survey and analysis of the American military experience from Colonial times through the Vietnam War. HIST 314 and MSL 314 are cross-listed courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 315 - Muslim Middle East (Put on Reserve 9/16/16.)


    Description:
    The origins and spread of Islamic civilization and its interaction with Graeco-Roman, Persian, and Indian civilizations. Crusades and the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire.  (Put on Reserve 9/16/16. Last taught in 2012. Will go inactive 8/24/19.)

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and places in the history of this area.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in the history of this area.
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly, orally and in writing.
    • Revise written work effectively.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 320 - Narcotics in World History


    Description:
    Explores the use of narcotics in ancient and modern world history and their relationship to warfare, commerce, public policy, human health, taxation, race, religion, gender and power. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize major types of narcotics as well as their use in ancient and modern history.
    • Analyze the role that narcotics play in ancient and modern history.
    • Create a schema that reflects the intersection and relational mechanics of narcotics with historical forces such as finance, health, warfare, social issues and governance.
    • Argue the role that public policy should take based on historical analysis of the ancient and modern world.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/19/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 321 - Latin America Through Film, Art, and Music


    Description:
    Analyzes the role of film, art, and music in understanding the social, cultural, and political history of Latin America in the colonial and modern eras.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand resistance movements, state formation projects, and historical memory and identity formation as portrayed in film, art, and music.
    • Develop an understanding of Latin American cultural historiography.
    • Understand continuity and change over time.
    • Places major films, works of art, and musical styles in historical context and positions them in relation to major events in Latin American history.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/2/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 322 - World Prehistory


    Description:

    Old- and New-world prehistory from late Pliocene to the early historic period, including the ecology and development of hunting-gathering, agriculture, and state-level societies. HIST 322 and ANTH 322 are cross-listed courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (4)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
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    HIST 323 - Food and Drink in Global History


    Description:
    Examination of cultural, political, and economic roles food and drink have played in global history, 1400 to present. Themes: cultural exchange and globalization; national, ethnic and gender identities; empire and slavery; war; industrialization; politics of food.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of how foodways of different nations and social groups have shaped and been shaped by historical events.
    • Critically analyze similarities and differences in foodways across nations and social groups throughout the world, and over time from 1400 to the present.
    • Relate and compare their own foodways to those of other cultural groups, past and present.
    • Critically analyze and evaluate individually and in groups the cultural, political and ethical implications of foodways past and present, and thus better understand what’s been and is at stake in deciding what to eat and drink.
    • Apply critical thinking skills to historical sources in order to craft well-supported arguments in written and oral presentations.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 325 - Renaissance and Reformation


    Description:
    Survey of European political, social, cultural, and economic revolutions from the 14th to16th centuries; including medieval dissolution, humanism, overseas exploration, Protestantism, and popular culture. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and places in Renaissance/Reformation  history.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues In Renaissance/Reformation  history.
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly.
    • Choose a Renaissance/Reformation topic and develop a thesis-driver research paper based on primary sources.
    • Give examples of the relationship between the past and contemporary events and problems.
    • Conceptualize the rich diversity of human experience in other times and places.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/5/2007

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 328 - Modern Latin America


    Description:
    Analyzes the history of Latin America in the past two centuries, from the Wars of Independence to the present day.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the key events of modern Latin American history, and analyze their principal causes and consequences.
    • Recognize the historians’ craft of empathy and analyze primary documents from this perspective.
    • Analyze primary and secondary materials from and about Latin America to support and synthesize an evaluation of historical evidence.
    • Organize, present, and communicate your own opinions in a thoughtful, coherent fashion.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/20/2020

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    HIST 329 - The Tropics and the Modern World


    Description:
    Analyzes the history of the modern world through the history of tropical commodities.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the key events of modern history, and analyze their principal causes and consequences.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of your connections to peoples around the globe.
    • Recognize the historians’ craft of empathy and analyze primary documents from this perspective.
    • Compare and contrast opposing historical interpretations, and come to your own perspective through a careful consideration of all relevant materials.
    • Organize, present, and communicate your own opinions in a thoughtful, coherent fashion.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/6/2003

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 330 - Africa to 1800


    Description:
    This course is designed to explore Africa’s earliest civilizations; internal processes of change; external influences; state formation; complex societies; connections to the world economy.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and places in the history of this area.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in the history of this area.
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly, orally and in writing.
    • Revise written work effectively.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/18/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 331 - Colonial Africa


    Description:
    Africa on the eve of colonial conquest; causes of imperialism; colonial rule and African reactions and initiatives; independence and colonial legacy.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and places in the history of this area.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in the history of this area.
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly, orally and in writing.
    • Revise written work effectively.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 332 - History of the Black Diaspora


    Description:
    This course focuses on the black diaspora. It looks at the movement and impact of black people from Africa to other parts of the world. It examines their contribution to world civilizations and identities.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify significant contributions of Africa and the Black diaspora to world civilization and cultures.
    • Describe the implications of race, class, identity and gender in the history of Black people.
    • Analyze and synthesize primary and secondary sources on Black People and put forward a well-supported argument on their own.
    • Identify differing explanations of the history of people of African descent across the world and through this, be able to make connections between cause and effect in the discipline of history.
    • Make a clearly-written and clearly presented argument, including a thesis and sufficient and well-used supporting detail of relevant material.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/31/2007

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 333 - Visual Cultures of Africa


    Description:
    Using painting, sculpture, performance, photography, and film, this course examines historical meaning and representations through visual media created in and about Africa, and how these media are presented in the West. Course will be taught every other year beginning in Spring 2019.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze visual artifacts within their cultural contexts, recognizing that meanings and significance of art, images, and objects are bounded and created.
    • Analyze and synthesize different types of primary and secondary sources, taking into account the relative insights different sources can offer historians, in order to craft well-support arguments.
    • Express original arguments in written form based on evidence.
    • Identify and explain complex historical dynamics informing the creation and exchange of visual media and circulation of ideas about ritual, performance, entertainment, and decoration.
    • Express knowledge about African art and design clearly in oral form.
    • Describe and explain how African art and design are represented and and presented in the United States and Europe, particularly in museums.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/31/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: EllensburgWinter Locations: EllensburgSpring Locations: Ellensburg
  
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    HIST 334 - History of Gender and Sexuality in Africa from Pre-colonial Times to the Present


    Description:

    This course examines the histories and changing aspects of gender and sexuality in different African contexts from the pre-colonial to the post-colonial eras. Topics will include marriage, politics, prestige, wealth, social cohesion, Christianity, AIDs, etc.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, themes, and concepts in the history of gender in Africa.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in the history of gender in Africa.
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly, orally and in writing.
    • Revise written work effectively.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/21/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 339 - Colonial British America


    Description:
    Social, cultural, political, and economic life in the British colonies of North America to 1763. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Conceptualize an American history outside the framework of a national political narrative.
    • Develop a capacity for empathy towards and engagement with the diverse peoples of early America.
    • Engage with people unlike themselves (such as Native Americans and African Americans) on their own terms - rather than as passive victims or “savages” (noble or otherwise).
    • Identify, author, and read several genres of historical writing.
    • Formulate historical questions, identify relevant evidence, and create convincing interpretations that answer those questions.
    • Reconstruct patterns of historical developments, and apply them to fundamentally historical questions about continuity, change, and historical causation.
    • Identify and characterize the global forces at work in particular, highly localized colonial societies.
    • Apply basic concepts drawn from disciplines such as economics, literary criticism, anthropology and sociology to the study of early American history.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/8/1998

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 341 - The Constitution and the New Republic, 1783-1800


    Description:
    Explores the origins of American government, society and culture by examining the Articles of Confederation, the crisis of the 1780s, the Constitutional convention, ratification, the Federalists and Anti-Federalists, the creation of the first two-party system, Republican Motherhood, slavery, and the formation of American identity.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Distinguish primary sources from secondary literature.
    • Develop and defend a thesis.
    • Differentiate between short-term and long-term historical forces and move beyond fact and date memorization to interpretation.
    • Deliver concise, cogent oral arguments on a given historical question.
    • Identify the role cultural understandings of race, class and gender play in history and how they affect the experience of individuals and groups in different historical contexts.
    • Identify the historical context that produced the U.S. Constitution and other milestones in the formation of American government and identity, as distinct from presentist interpretations of the Constitution and ‘Founding Era’.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/18/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 344 - American Manhood in Historical Perspective (Put on reserve 9/16/19)


    Description:
    This course examines the cultural construction of masculinity in America from the colonial period to the present. Important topics include the interplay between gender and politics, sexuality, race, courtship, religion, honor, and violence. (Put on reserve 9/16/19, will go inactive 8/24/22)

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate research and writing skills including effective organization, grammar, and style.
    • Work cooperatively with others preparing a formal presentation.
    • Analyze and historicize gender constructions and connect them with larger social, cultural, and economic themes.
    • Critically analyze historical documents and writings for gender bias.
    • Understand trends in the study of gender and sexuality through an overview of representative literature.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/22/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 346 - Women in American History (Put on reserve 9/16/19)


    Description:
    A survey of the role of women, their treatment, and response in American society from colonial times to the present. (Put on reserve 9/16/19, will go inactive 8/24/22)

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and themes in US women’s history.
    • Analyze the impact of economic, political and social forces on women’s public and private lives.
    • Compare and evaluate opposing interpretations of historical issues by scholars, historical figures, film-makers, novelists, and journalists.
    • Recognize and appreciate diversity and interdependence.
    • Understand the relationship between past and contemporary actions and strategies.
    • Familiarize with history sources in the university library.
    • Apply critical thinking and objectivity to evaluation of primary and secondary sources.
    • Collect, organize, write, document and revise research materials and interpretations clearly, in writing and speaking.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/31/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 370 - Medieval European History


    Description:
    Survey of Western European history from late antiquity to the 16th century; political, economic, social, and religious thought and institutions.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and places in medieval history on examinations and in research papers.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in medieval history on examinations and in research papers.
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources in research papers.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions, in class discussions and in research papers.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly in written research papers and oral class discussions.
    • Choose a medieval topic and develop a thesis-driven research paper based on primary sources.
    • Give examples of the relationship between the past and contemporary events and problems in discussion.
    • Conceptualize the rich diversity of human experience in other times and places.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 375 - The European Enlightenment 1688-1815


    Description:
    Social and intellectual history of Europe between the Glorious Revolution and the end of the Napoleonic Wars. Writers such as Locke, Voltaire and Rousseau will be emphasized because of their influence on the modern world.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze significant issues, trends and developments in early modern European history.
    • Demonstrate knowledge that history is not simply the recitation of names and dates, but is a fluid subject where interpretations are constantly changing as a result of different methods or patterns of analysis.
    • Analyze and synthesize primary and secondary sources in order to put forward well-supported arguments.
    • Make a clearly-written and clearly-presented argument, including a thesis and sufficient and well-used supporting evidence.
    • Identify differing explanations of historical change and the connections between cause and effect in the discipline of history.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/20/2020

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    HIST 380 - Modern East Asia


    Description:
    A survey of the modern histories of China, Japan, and Korea from 1600 to the present. Imperialism, nationalism, and the rise of communism are covered.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand the nature of history as a discipline, including the need to think chronologically and to understand different historical and cultural perspectives.
    • Analyze important trends in the history of China, Japan, and Korea since the start of the 17th century and explain the causes and effects of those trends.
    • Learn to perceive, create, and/or use criteria to assess the reasonableness, acceptability, or quality of historical sources and arguments.
    • Learn to write concise and coherent historical essays.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 381 - Life Hacks for Transfer Student Success


    Description:
    This course provides transfer students with tips, tools and strategies for success at CWU. Students connect with faculty and peers to create an individualized plan for degree completion and professional success. (CAH/COM/ENG/HIST/PHIL/RELS/WLC 381) are cross-listed courses; a student may only receive credit for one.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify common transfer issues and propose strategies for success at CWU.
    • Generate connections with faculty and peers in the discipline.
    • Plan an efficient pathway to graduation.
    • Identify CWU and community resources available for different types of support.
    • Demonstrate knowledge and use of discipline specific practices using CWU academic resources.
    • Design an individualized plan for engagement in the discipline

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/23/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg, Online Winter Locations: Ellensburg, Online Spring Locations: Ellensburg, Online Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  •  

    HIST 383 - East Asian Civilization


    Description:
    A general survey of the development of civilization in China, Japan, and Korea to about 1600.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 385 - Aztec, Inca, Maya: Empire and City in the New World


    Description:
    Introduces students to three key urban civilizations: the Mexica (Aztecs), Mayans, and Inca. the course focuses on political and social history as well as the “conquest” of those groups by the Spanish empire.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the foundation and maintenance of city civilization among the Mexica (Aztecs), Inca, and Maya.
    • Explain key examples of the interaction between humans and the environmental landscape as well as the consequences of those actions.
    • Compare and contrast imperial strategies for conquest/ expansion and governance of the Mexica (Aztecs), Inca, and Maya.
    • Identify and explain foundational aspects of Mexica (Aztec), Inca, and Maya identity, including but not limited to music, architecture, science, literature, and religion.
    • Identify and explain the major events of the Spanish conquest of the Mexica (Aztec), Inca, and Maya civilizations.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/17/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 386 - The Latin American Colonies


    Description:
    Analyzes the history of Latin America and the Caribbean from pre-Columbian times to the Wars of Independence.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 395 - Research in Local History


    Description:
    Comparative local history with emphasis on research techniques and the utilization of sources. May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 421 - Methods and Materials in the Social Studies, Secondary


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Certification Program. EDCS 311 is a recommended prerequisite.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply knowledge of government, law, and politics to produce pedagogically effective curriculum and instruction.
    • Apply knowledge of economic concepts and systems to produce pedagogically effective curriculum and instruction.
    • Apply knowledge of how geographic features and human cultures shape and impact environments to produce pedagogically effective curriculum and instruction.
    • Apply knowledge of historical eras, turning points, major ideas, individuals, and themes of local, Washington state, tribal, United States, and world history to produce pedagogically effective curriculum and instruction.
    • Identify and explain the major issue and philosophies shaping history and socials studies education today.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/11/2009

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 422 - Roman and Medieval Britain


    Description:
    The British Isles from Roman times to the beginnings of the Tudor dynasty. Course will cover the rise of the English monarchy, the creation of parliament, and the colonization of the British Isles. HIST 422 and HIST 522 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze significant issues, trends and developments in early British history.
    • Demonstrate knowledge that history is not simply the recitation of names and dates, but instead is a fluid subject where interpretations are constantly changing as a result of different methodologies and patterns of analysis.
    • Analyze and synthesize primary and secondary sources in order to put forward a well-supported argument of their own.
    • Make a clearly-written and clearly-presented argument, including a thesis and sufficient and well-used supporting detail.
    • Identify differing explanations of historical change and the connections between cause and effect in the discipline of history.
    • Analyze the relationship between different regions in the British isles.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/2015

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 423 - The Irish Revolution


    Description:
    History and historiography of the Irish revolution. Topics include the constitutional and revolutionary antecedents, the course of the revolution, and the foundation of the Irish Free State. HIST 423 and HIST 523 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze significant issues, trends and developments in the history and historiography of the Irish Revolution.
    • Demonstrate knowledge that history is not imply the recitation of names and dates, but instead is a fluid subject where interpretations are constantly changing as a result of different methodologies and patterns of analysis.
    • Analyze and synthesize primary and secondary sources in order to put forward a well-supported argument of their own.
    • Make a clearly-written and clearly-presented argument, including a thesis and sufficient and well-used supporting detail.
    • Identify differing explanations of historical change and the connections between cause and effect in the discipline of history.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/15/2007

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 424 - Modern Ireland: 1798-present


    Description:
    The history of Ireland from the revolt of 1798 through the present. Focus will be on the varieties of Irish nationalism, the process of state-building, and the ongoing troubles in the north. HIST 424 and HIST 524 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    Analyze significant issues, trends and developments in Irish history, particularly those that revolve around the role of religion the shifting definitions of Irish identity, and the varieties of Irish nationalism.

    Demonstrate knowledge that history is not simply the recitation of names and dates, but is a fluid subject where interpretations are constantly changing as a result of different methods or patterns of analysis.

    Analyze and synthesize primary and secondary sources in order to put forward well-supported arguments.

    Make a clearly-written and clearly-presented argument, including a thesis and sufficient and well-used supporting evidence.

    Compare the ways in which artists and fiction writers use history and historical events with the ways in which historians use history and historical events.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/16/2006

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
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    HIST 426 - France 1789-1945


    Description:
    French history through the lens of revolution. Discussions of the variety of French revolutions (1789, 1792, 1830, 1848, 1870) and concluding with the National Revolution of Vichy France. HIST 426 and HIST 526 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze significant issues, trends and developments in French history.
    • Demonstrate knowledge that history is not simply the recitation of names and dates, but is a fluid subject where interpretations are constant) changing as a result of different methods or patterns of analysis.
    • Analyze and synthesize primary and secondary sources in order to put forward well-supported arguments.
    • Make a clearly-written and clearly-presented argument, including a thesis and sufficient and well-used supporting evidence.
    • Identify differing explanations of historical change and the connections between cause and effect in the discipline of history.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/19/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    HIST 427 - Modern Britain and the Empire since 1763


    Description:
    History of Britain and the Empire since the Seven Years’ War. Topics include growth of empire, industrialization, political reform, world wars, decolonization, and post-war social changes. HIST 427 and HIST 527 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze significant issues, trends and developments in Modern British history.
    • Demonstrate knowledge that history is not simply the recitation of names and dates, but is a fluid subject where interpretations are constantly changing as a result of different methods or patterns of analysis.
    • Analyze and synthesize primary and secondary sources in order to put forward well-supported arguments.
    • Make a clearly-written and clearly-presented argument, including a thesis and sufficient and well-used supporting evidence.
    • Identify differing explanations of historical change and the connections between cause and effect in the discipline of history.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/18/2003

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 428 - Early Modern Britain 1485-1763


    Description:
    History of the Britain and the Empire during the Tudor-Stuart and early Hanoverian periods. Topics covered include the origins of the British Empire, the development of the British state, the Civil War and the Glorious Revolution. HIST 428 and HIST 528 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze significant issues, trends and developments in early modern British history.
    • Demonstrate knowledge that history is not simply the recitation of names and dates, but is a fluid subject where interpretations are constantly changing as a result of different methods or patterns of analysis.
    • Analyze and synthesize primary and secondary sources in order to put forward well-supported arguments.
    • Make a clearly-written and clearly-presented argument, including a thesis and sufficient and well-used supporting evidence.
    • Identify differing explanations of historical change and the connections between cause and effect in the discipline of history.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/17/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 429 - Ireland and Empire


    Description:
    Study of the interactions between Ireland and various world empires. The major emphasis will be Irish interaction with the British Empire, but there will also be discussion of Ireland’s interaction with other global empires.  HIST 429 and HIST 529 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:\

    • Analyze significant issues, trends and developments in the study of Ireland’s relationship with various world empires and in the study of the role of empires and imperialism in Irish history
    • Demonstrate knowledge that history is not simply the recitation of names and dates, but instead is a fluid subject where interpretations are constantly changing as a result of different methodologies and patterns of analysis
    • Analyze and synthesize primary and secondary sources in order to put forward a well-supported argument of their own
    • Make a clearly-written and clearly-presented argument, including a thesis and sufficient and well-used supporting detail
    • Identify differing explanations of historical change and the connections between cause and effect in the discipline of history
    • Analyze the relationship between Ireland, the Irish people, and the British Empire

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/21/2016

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 432 - The Era of World War I


    Description:
    An exploration of the material, cultural and intellectual history of Europe between 1900 and 1925. It will look at the problems of modernity and the industrial future and how the answers caused the Great War.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Critique the cultural changes of the 1900-1930 era in Europe;
    • Appraise the chronology of and significance of important events and people in European cultural history between 1900 and 1930;
    • Interpret and compare historical documents in the perspective of their time and place;
    • Determine how the cultural changes are dependent on space, new technology and ideology;
    • Assess patterns of change and recognize  how fact selection influences interpretations of events.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/3/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg

  
  •  

    HIST 434 - American Indian History to 1795 (Put on reserve 9/16/19)


    Description:
    Discussion and lecture course on Native North American history from 1492 to the founding of the American Republic, and an introduction to the discipline and practice of ethnohistory, which combines traditional historical analysis with ethnographic concepts and research methodologies. HIST 434 and HIST 534 are layered courses, students may not receive credit for both. (Put on reserve 9/16/19, will go inactive 8/24/22)

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Develop analytical thinking and writing skills.
    • Understand and appreciate cultural differences in American history, and the variety of Native American experiences.
    • Understand the dynamics of cultural interaction between Native and Europeans/Euro-Americans; and to grasp the myriad strategies for survival adopted by Native peoples in the face of the gradually encroaching Euro-American political hegemony.
    • Overcome stereotypes of Indians as impediments to “civilization” or “progress,” and learn to view Native Americans as active participants in American history rather than passive observers or victims while Europeans and Americans “made” history.
    • Comprehend basic principles of ethnohistorical approach and research: cultural change and/or continuity over time; syncretism; multiple causation with respect to historical events; and seeing culture as adaptive and responsive rather than static.
    • Map historiographic treatment of Native Americans and integrate American Indian history into the mainstream American historical narrative.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/17/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 438 - American Indian History since 1795


    Description:
    Examines American Indian history since the Treaty of Greenville, wherein the U.S. recognized tribal sovereignty. Themes include resistance, assimilation, cultural revitalization, federal Indian policy, sovereignty, and reservation economics. HIST 438 and HIST 538 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and explain key provisions in treaties between the U.S. and Indian peoples between 1795 and 1871, when the U.S. ceased to ·negotiate treaties with tribes.
    • Explain the effectiveness–and effects of–American Indian attempts to resist conquest and assimilation. Also explain how resistance has changed over time.
    • Explain the meaning of American Indian sovereignty and discuss its limitations. Discuss how the nature of sovereignty has changed between 1795 and the present.
    • Identify major changes in federal Indian policy since 1795 and explain how those changes affected Indian peoples.
    • Differentiate and explain the twentieth-century economic strategies of American Indian peoples, including wage labor, resource extraction, tourism, and gambling. Explain the impact of those strategies and assess their success.
    • Trace and explain historiographical trends in American Indian history.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/18/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 440 - The American Revolution


    Description:
    Causes and consequences of the American Revolution, 1688-1789. HIST 440 and HIST 540 are layered  courses; students may receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Distinguish primary from secondary literature.
    • Develop and defend a thesis.
    • Differentiate short-term from long-term historical forces.
    • Interpret rather than memorize history.
    • Understand humans as both products and agents of history.
    • Understand how the past shapes the present.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/21/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 442 - Jefferson, Jackson, and American Growth, 1800-1848


    Description:
    Election of Jefferson to ratification of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. Examines growth of political parties; development of a “working” and a “middle” class; changing gender relations; Manifest Destiny; Indian Removal; expansion of slavery; and revolutions in transportation, communication, and markets. HIST 442 and 542 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the causes and implications of revolutions in transportation (esp. railroads, steamboats, canals), communication (telegraph and steam presses), and market capitalism, and explain how state and federal planning either did or did not promote those revolutions.
    • Explain similarities of and differences between the first party system and the second party system.
    • Explain why slavery expanded and what political, economic, and social consequences ensued.
    • Explain why “Manifest Destiny” occurred and what political, economic, and social consequences ensued.
    • Differentiate the “working class” from the “middle class”, and explain how and why each developed in the nineteenth century.
    • Explain and provide a chronology on historiography (the history of historical interpretation) of either slavery, Manifest Destiny, class development, gender evolution, or the market revolution OR produce an analytical paper (based on primary resources).

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/17/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 443 - The West in American History


    Description:
    Exploration, territorial acquisition, patterns of settlement, economic development, and the influence of the frontier on American institutions. HIST 443 and HIST 543 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and places in the history of this area.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in the history of this area.
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly, orally and in writing.
    • Revise written work effectively.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
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    HIST 444 - Sectionalism, Civil War, and Reconstruction


    Description:

    Slavery, the Old South, sectionalism, the breakdown of the Union, and secession. A military, political, and social history of North and South during the Civil War, and the aftermath of the war. HIST 444 and HIST 544 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and places in the history of this area.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in the history of this area.
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly, orally and in writing.
    • Revise written work effectively.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 445 - Introduction to Public History (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    This course examines the venues through which the general public learns American history, with visits and analysis of exhibits and their interpretation. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate researching and writing skills including effective organization, grammar, and style.
    • Critique interpretations of history in museums and other historical sites.
    • Compare scholarly analyses of specific historical events with views conveyed at regional public history sites such as museums, cemeteries, historic houses, battlefields and forts.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/29/2010

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 450 - Exploring U.S. Cultural History


    Description:

    Thematic approach to 19th century cultural transformations in U.S. Selected topics; mesmerism, utopias, true womanhood, women’s rights, slave spirituals, confidence men, and gold rushes. HIST 450 and HIST 550 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Comprehend the relationship between political, social, and cultural history.
    • Comprehend discourse as a force that shapes history.
    • Comprehend the difference between power and discourse.
    • Comprehend the variety of cultural forms and experiences that shape history.
    • Identify the relationship between historical fact and historical interpretation.
    • Analyze cause and effect relationships.
    • Present original historical analysis orally and in writing.
    • Plan and write a research paper.
    • Locate finding aids, primary sources, and secondary literature in the library.
    • Learn correct citation formats.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/17/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 452 - 20th Century U.S.: 1919-1945


    Description:
    Prosperity and depression; the New Deal and its implications; World War II, origins and conclusion. HIST 452 and HIST 552 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and places in the history of this area.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in the history of this area.
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly, orally and in writing.
    • Revise written work effectively.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 454 - American Environmental History (Put on reserve 9/16/19)


    Description:
    Environmental values and practices of the diverse populations of America. HIST 454 and HIST 554 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both. (Put on reserve 9/16/19, will go inactive 8/24/22)

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Reconstruct the historic meaning of events by identifying who was involved, what happened, where it happened, what events led to these developments, and what consequences followed.
    • Reconstruct patterns of historical continuity and change.
    • Analyze cause and effect relationships bearing in mind multiple causation.
    • Differentiate between historical facts and historical interpretations, but acknowledge that the two are related.
    • Perform research in primary and secondary sources.
    • Identify the central questions and perspectives in primary documents.
    • Bring sound and relevant historical analysis to the service of informed decision making on current environmental issues.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/21/2002

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 455 - The 1950s: An American Cultural History


    Description:
    Survey of cultural and social trends found in the United States between 1945 and 1960; suburban and commercial development, the economic prosperity, changing gender roles, race, development of television, new musical genres and teenage culture. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define the cultural changes of the 1945-1960 era
    • Recognize and reconstruct the chronology of and significance of important events and people in U.S. cultural history between 1945 and 1960.
    • Interpret historical documents in the perspective of their time and place.
    • Identify how the cultural change is dependent on space, new technology and ideology.
    • Recognize patterns of change and understand  how fact selection influences interpretations of events

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/19/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 456 - The 1960s: An American Cultural History


    Description:
    Survey of United States cultural and social trends between 1960 and 1975; environmental movements, civil rights, economy, gender and race, radical politics, new musical genres and teenagers. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Critique the cultural changes of the 1960-1975 era
    • Appraise the chronology of and significance of important events and people in U.S. cultural history between 1960 and 1975.
    • Interpret and compare historical documents in the perspective of their time and place.
    • Determine how the cultural changes are dependent on space, new technology and ideology.
    • Assess patterns of change and recognize  how fact selection influences interpretations of events

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/4/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 457 - Rock and Roll as Art and History


    Description:
    This course is an experience of Rock and Roll through a multidimensional and multimedia approach that balances understanding the significance of rock and roll in its historical and cultural environment while focusing on the music.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize the historical and cultural significance of rock and roll and be able to explain why Rock and Roll developed and how it has been transformed in recent times.  A particular focus is to discuss the intertwining of music, meaning and generational issues over the last five decades of the 20th century.
    • Develop oral and written skills to synthesize and communicate the relationship between historical causality and developments in popular culture.
    • To reflect on the music in non-cognitive ways that allows for ways of knowing that include empathic and aesthetic responsiveness.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/17/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    HIST 460 - Religion in Latin America


    Description:
    Analyzes the relationship between individuals, religious movements, and the state from the pre-Columbian era to the present. HIST 460 and HIST 560 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand relationships between individuals, the state, and religion in Latin America.
    • Develop and defend a thesis statement (an historical assertion argued with facts and logic).
    • Understand continuity and change over time.
    • Understand basic ideas, beliefs, and concepts of various religious groups in Latin America.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/17/2013

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 461 - History of Health and Healing in Africa (Put on Reserve 9/1/2020)


    Description:
    This course explores different African societies’ approaches to the ideas of personal and social health, healing, and medicine, and how these have changed over time. HIST 461 and HIST 561 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both. (Put on reserve 9/1/2020, will go inactive 8/24/23)

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define different categories of health and healing and connect these to distinct political, social, and medical practices
    • Analyze primary and secondary sources about the past, linking them to the individuals/schools of thought that produced them and their implications for our understanding of the past
    • Explain connections between different approaches to health and healing in both oral and written form
    • Identify why and how historical modes of evaluating health and healing have changed over time

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/3/2016

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 462 - History of American Foreign Relations: 1900-1941


    Description:
    From the Spanish-American War to Pearl Harbor. HIST 462 and HIST 562 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and places in the history of this area.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in the history of this area.
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly, orally and in writing.
    • Revise written work effectively.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 468 - Modern Japanese History: Tradition and Change


    Description:
    This course explores Japanese history and culture from 1600 to contemporary times.  Utilizing lectures, discussions, readings and projects, the focus will be on the modernization process with its concomitant political, social, economic, and intellectual changes. HIST 468 and HIST 568 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered on odd numbered years (Winter).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Articulate how Japanese history was shaped by geography, events, cultural, social, and religious changes.
    • Identify and analyze key historical events, people and trends, in the primary military events, including the internal wars and the development of the Shogunate, the Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War, and World War II fought by Japan.
    • Describe issues of international encounters including adaptation to foreign encounters, reform, and aggressive colonialism to other Asians. Post-WWII development of new adaptations and political trends will be explored.
    • Demonstrate critical and creative thinking and organizational skills in writing projects, and cognitively mapped preparations for small group discussions.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/4/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 469 - History of Russian and Soviet Women


    Description:
    Examination of the social status and cultural representations of women in Russia and the Soviet union from the 17th century to the present. HIST 469 and 569 are layered courses; students may not recieve credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Correctly identify and describe the significance of key events, persons, and places in Russian women’s history
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in Russian women’s history
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources
    • Organize and present ideas clearly, orally and in writing
    • Give examples of the relationship between the past and contemporary events and problems
    • Compose thesis-driven research papers using primary and secondary sources
    • Plan and lead an in-class discussion on assigned source material
    • Formally compare opposing historical arguments and opinions (HIST 569)
    • Plan, prepare, and deliver a 20-minute lecture on a significant theme in Russian women’s history (HIST 569)
    • Compose an original thesis-driven research paper using multiple primary and secondary sources (HIST 569)

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/17/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    HIST 472 - German History since 1815


    Description:
    A political, socio-economic, and intellectual study of Germany with special attention to the causes, progress, and aftermath of the National Socialist State. HIST 472 and HIST 572 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and places in the history of this area.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in the history of this area.
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly, orally and in writing.
    • Revise written work effectively.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions about this area.
    • Research, organize, and present an academic lecture on the history of this area.
    • Compare opposing primary documents on the history of this area.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/20/2020

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    HIST 473 - Russia to 1881


    Description:
    The political, social, economic, and cultural development of Russia from ancient times to the assassination of Alexander II. HIST 473 and HIST 573 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and places in the history of this area.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in the history of this area,
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly, orally and in writing.
    • Revise written work effectively.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 474 - Russia Since 1881


    Description:
    The political, economic, social and cultural history of Russia and the Soviet Union since 1881. HIST 474 and HIST 574 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and places in the history of this area.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in the history of this area.
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly, orally and in writing.
    • Revise written work effectively.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/2012

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 476 - History of Modern East Europe


    Description:
    Poland, Czech, Slovak Republics, Austria, Hungary, Romania, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Greece, Albania, with special attention to multi-ethnicity, economic underdevelopment and modernization, political dependence, and nationalism. HIST 476 and HIST 576 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key political and physical features of East European geography on map quizzes.
    • Identify and describe the historical significance of key terms in East European history on exams.
    • Reconstruct patterns of historical continuity and change in East Europe in papers, presentations, and exams.
    • Prepare and present historical analysis orally (presentations, discussions) and in writing (papers and exams).
    • Plan and write a seminar-length research paper based on a literary source, other primary evidence (HIST576) and secondary evidence.
    • Identify the relationship between historical fact and historical interpretations, on exams and papers.
    • Analyze cause and effect relationships, bearing in mind multiple causation, on exams and papers.
    • Bring sound and relevant historical analysis to the service of informed decision making, in discussion.
    • Research, organize, and present a research-in-progress lecture (HIST 576).

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/3/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    HIST 477 - Vietnam: Revolution in Full Circle


    Description:
    The history of Vietnam has been important for study of the second half of the twentieth century. This course focuses on a broader perspective of historical processes of revolution and anti-colonialism.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Articulate how Vietnamese history was shaped by geography, events, cultural, social, and religious changes.
    • Identify and analyze key historical events, people and trends in the primary military invasions of Vietnam.
    • Synthesize course materials to recognize the nature of Vietnamese identity from antiquity to the current society.
    • Describe issues of revolution, social justice, and colonialism.
    • Apply critical thinking and organizational skills in writing projects, and cognitively mapped preparations for small group discussions.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/3/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Winter Locations: Ellensburg
  
  •  

    HIST 478 - Russian Far East


    Description:
    Russian Far East history from 16th century Cossack exploration to 21st century democracy. Topics include the imperial “urge to the sea,” the Trans-Siberian Railway, the Soviet gulag system, and Pacific Rim relations. HIST 478 and HIST 578 are layered courses; a student may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key events, persons, and places in Russian Asian history.
    • Isolate and analyze significant issues in Russian Asian history.
    • Critically analyze primary and secondary sources.
    • Compare opposing interpretations and opinions.
    • Organize and present ideas clearly.
    • Give examples of the relationship between the past and contemporary events and problems.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/20/2020

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  •  

    HIST 481 - Senior Thesis


    Description:
    Analysis of the nature of history, of the way historians reason, and of the search for meaning in history. Students must earn a minimum grade of C as a major requirement. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: HIST 302 with a grade of C or higher and senior standing.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Locate finding aids, primary, secondary, and tertiary materials in the library, archives, and online
    • Analyze and draw reasoned conclusions from primary and secondary sources
    • Isolate and compare the central question(s) and perspective(s) of different kinds of historical narrative
    • Reconstruct patterns of historical continuity and change in the historical period of study
    • Analyze cause and effect relationships, bearing in mind multiple causation
    • Identify the relationship between historical fact and historical interpretations, and situate analysis within a larger historiography
    • Plan and write a substantial research paper on a topic of your choice, based on preparatory steps
    • Present coherent, persuasive, and original historical analysis orally and in writing
    • Demonstrate proper use of formal source citation and avoid plagiarism
    • Share ideas and critique historical works as part of a collegial community of scholars

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/16/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 483 - Modern China


    Description:
    The history of China in the 19th and 20th centuries, including the nature of China’s response to the West and the Chinese Revolution of the 20th century. Emphasis on internal social and economic change. HIST 483 and HIST 583 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 485 - Trauma, History, and Memory in East Asia


    Description:
    Examination of histories and memories of the traumatic events in the 20th century across East Asia. Topics include the massacres, the sexual enslavement of women, the atomic bombings, and mass violence. HIST 485 and HIST 585 are layered courses; a student may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Critically analyze ideas and arguments concerning traumatic histories in Modern East Asia
    • Analyze and synthesize various types of primary sources (oral history materials, contemporary official reports, fictional writings, and newspapers) and secondary sources (journal articles, monographs, and films) in order to put forward well-supported arguments.
    • Make a clearly-written and clearly-presented argument, including a thesis and sufficient and well-used supporting evidence.
    • Demonstrate knowledge that there has been complex relationship between national histories and collective memoires in modern East Asian societies.
    • Demonstrate research and communication skills. 

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/9/2020

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg

  
  •  

    HIST 488 - Mexico in the Modern Era


    Description:
    Analyzes the modern history of Mexico, from independence to the present day. HIST 488 and HIST 588 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  
    Learning Agreement Forms

    HIST 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized, contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student-learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. HIST 490 and HIST 590 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both. Department consent. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U.

    Credits: (1-8)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  
  •  

    HIST 497 - Honors Individual Study


    Description:
    Open to students accepted into the departmental honors program. This course may be repeated once, but no more than an over-all total of 6 credits per quarter is permitted.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HIST 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Hospitality Tourism and Events (HTE)

  
  •  

    HTE 201 - Introduction to Hospitality, Tourism, and Event Management


    Description:
    This is an introduction to the foundational entities of hospitality, tourism and event operations. The course explores information on the nature, scope, and significance of these fields of study at the local, regional, and international levels. The course introduces management issues specific to HTE operations. Formerly RT/RTE 201, students may only receive credit for one. 

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize the scope of the hospitality, travel, tourism and events industry.
    • Apply professional practices of the profession.
    • Explain historical, scientific, and philosophical foundations of hospitality, tourism and events.
    • Describe the various sectors of hospitality, tourism and events and their interactions.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/19/2019

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HTE 202 - Food and Beverage Operations


    Description:
    Introduction to food and beverage operations in a variety of service outlets. Students will earn state-mandated certifications for food and beverage establishments while learning career pathways, supply chains, cost controls, upselling, and front-of-house operations.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Comprehend the history, present state, and predictions for the future of types of foodservice including those available to them as career pathways.
    • Recognize the levels of supply chain management in food and beverage operations.
    • Formulate a preventive maintenance plan for cleaning and maintaining primary facilities and equipment.
    • Demonstrate an ability to set spaces professionally using various mis-en-place strategies depending on the type of food and beverage facility and the occasion.
    • Identify best practices in managing front-of-house and back-of-house food and beverage operations.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/22/2019

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HTE 230 - Program and Event Budgeting


    Description:
    Budget processes, terminology, and formats will be covered along with the preparation of basic budgets for events and programs. Formerly FSCG/RTE 230, a student may only receive credit for one. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define budget terminology
    • Describe Revenue and Expenditure Formats.
    • Prepare and present a basic program/event budget.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/19/2019

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HTE 272 - Lodging Operations I


    Description:
    Examines the rooms division and front office functions critical to hotel operations. Includes the guest cycle, personnel supervision, sales techniques in the reservation process, and hotel organization and operation. Formerly RT/RTE 272, students may only receive credit for one.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the organization of the lodging industry and foundations of lodging operations.
    • Identify the ownership and management of lodging properties including Real Estate Investment Trusts (REIT), management companies, brands, and independent ownership.
    • Explain the Global Distribution System (ODS) including Social Media and Online Travel Agents used in the lodging industry.
    • Describe the operation of the Property Management System including the interaction of the reservations, registration and in house accounting systems.
    • Describe the processes involved in the foundations of lodging accounting (forecasting, revenue management, approving credit, posting to accounts and night audit).

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/19/2019

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HTE 273 - Airline Operations


    Description:
    Examines the airline industry, its components and methods of operation; the interaction with other segments of the industry. Industry-specific coding and terminology, basic aviation principles, and aviation industry skill sets will be the focus of the course, as well as airline legislation, risk management, airport supervision, and security. Formerly RT/RTE 473, a student may only receive credit for one.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of airline procedures for passenger check-in at ticket counters and boarding gates, acceptance of luggage & tracing of mishandled baggage.
    • Explain flight check-in procedures, ground operations procedures, and how airports manage the flight process using correct industry terminology.
    • Explain the activities of airports from airside operations and landside to terminal operations.
    • Identify historical attributes of the airline industry.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/19/2019

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HTE 292 - Practicum


    Description:
    Forty on-the-job hours of practical experience per one credit hour earned. Four additional hours may be applied toward the hospitality tourism elective area. A minimum of one credit must be taken as a service-learning activity. May be repeated up to 12 credits.

    Credits: (1-4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Outcomes vary by field experience.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/22/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  
    Individual Study Registration Form

    HTE 296 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated up to 10 credits. Permission of department.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Learner Outcomes vary by topic.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/22/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  •  

    HTE 298 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated up to 10 credits.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Learner outcomes vary by topic.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/22/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
 

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