Oct 02, 2022  
2016-2017 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

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COM 321 - Visual Storytelling


Description:
The methods used to communicate journalistic stories effectively and ethically using still photography and video.

Prerequisites:
Prerequisite: admission to the digital journalism major, or instructor permission.

Credits: (4)

Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

Learner Outcome

Activity (optional)

Assessment

Students will be able to shoot pictures using basic technical aspects of visual composition such as “rule of thirds,” framing, balance, and contrast.

“Do it wrong” assignment where students create images that demonstrate  how to compose an video image incorrectly and then correctly.
Students collect examples of images and analyze why they are good or bad.

Graded assignments with rubrics.

Students will be able to shoot pictures showing the impact of speed, aperture, lighting, color and lens choice in visual imagery.

Assignment where students must manipulate  speed, aperture, lighting and color of the  same object to demonstrate the impact of each element on the image.

Assignment to collect examples of imagery where the use of speed, aperture, lighting, color and lens choice impacted the story telling of the image either positively or negatively.

Graded assignments with rubrics.

Students will be able to shoot pictures  that show  how distance impacts the visual’s ability to communicate the story.

Assignment to collect examples of how wide shots establish the scene, medium  shots define the players and close-up shots capture emotion/details.

Assignment to shoot story using wide, medium and close-up shots. Video students will submit a visual sequence.

Graded assignments with rubrics.

Students will demonstrate the impact and ethical considerations of image manipulation.

Supply students with original images and manipulated versions and have them analyze if the manipulation  enhances the viewers understanding or if it crosses ethical lines.

Students apply ethical and unethical manipulation to their own images.  They then explain how the ethical manipulation enhanced storytelling and how the unethical manipulation distorted the story.

Instructor rubric will evaluate team presentations requiring identification of ethical and unethical manipulation and an explanation as to why it is ethical or unethical.





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