Dec 01, 2022  
2016-2017 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Courses numbered from 101–299 are lower-division courses, primarily for freshmen and sophomores; those numbered from 300–499 are upper-division courses, primarily for juniors and seniors. The numbers 296, 396, 496, and 596 designate individual study courses and are available for registration by prior arrangement with the course instructor and approval of the department chair.

The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the amount of credit each course carries. Variable credit courses include the minimum and maximum number of the credits within parentheses.

Not all of the courses are offered every quarter. Final confirmation of courses to be offered, information on new courses and programs, as well as a list of hours, instructor, titles of courses and places of class meetings, is available online in My CWU which can be accessed through the the CWU home page, and go to www.cwu.edu/registrar/course-information

 

Human Resource Management (HRM)

  
  •  

    HRM 442 - Training and Development


    Description:
    Application of training and development concepts and techniques used in assessing training requirements, planning and budgeting training programs, developing and facilitating training, and evaluating results.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: HRM 381 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25 OR (HRM 381 and declaration of a Human Resource Management minor).

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    HRM 445 - Organizational Staffing


    Description:
    Applied and conceptual analysis of strategic personnel planning, recruiting, selecting, negotiating, socializing, career developing, retaining, and transitioning.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: HRM 381 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25; OR (HRM 381 and declaration of a Human Resource Management minor).

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    HRM 479 - Employee Relations


    Description:
    Statutory and case law governing labor relations. Contracts and negotiations. Impasse procedures. Arbitration cases and grievance procedures. Contemporary issues and cases.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: HRM 381 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25; OR (HRM 381 and declaration of a Human Resource Management minor).

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    HRM 486 - Problems in Human Resource Management


    Description:
    Analysis and research on selected topics involving contemporary issues in personnel management. This is the capstone course for the HRM specialization.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: HRM 381 AND 2 other HRM courses AND admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25.

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    HRM 488 - Compensation Policy and Administration


    Description:
    Employee compensation policy and administration is studied on a broad perspective encompassing direct financial payments, employer benefits, and non-financial rewards.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: HRM 381 AND admission to a college of business major AND completion of the college of business foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum grade of C- in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25.

    Credits: (5)


Humanities (HUM)

  
  •  

    HUM 101 - Exploring Cultures in the Ancient World


    Description:
    An interdisciplinary exploration from literature, history, philosophy, and the arts of selected major ancient civilizations in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas from their beginnings through the 15th century. AH-Literature and Humanities (W).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: ENG 101 with a grade of C- or higher.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category
    AH-Literature and Humanities (W).

  
  •  

    HUM 102 - Exploring Cultures from 16th through 19th Centuries


    Description:
    An interdisciplinary exploration of selected literature, history, philosophy, and the arts in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas from the 16th through the 19th centuries. AH-Literature and Humanities (W).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: ENG 101 with a grade of C- or higher.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category
    AH-Literature and Humanities (W).

  
  •  

    HUM 103 - Exploring Cultures in Modern and Contemporary Societies


    Description:
    An interdisciplinary exploration of literature, history, philosophy, and the arts of selected world civilizations of the 20th century. AH-Literature and Humanities (W).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: ENG 101 with a grade of C- or higher.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category
    AH-Literature and Humanities (W).

  
  •  

    HUM 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    HUM 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)


Individual Studies (IS)

  
  •  

    IS 200 - Introduction to Individual Studies


    Description:
    This course provides an introduction to the individual studies major. Students will learn the parameters for completing a individual studies degree and will develop their learning goals and course of study under the guidance of a faculty advisor. By permission. Grade will be S or U.

    Credits: (1)

  
  •  

    IS 298 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    IS 487 - End-of-Program Assessment


    Description:
    This course will assist students in preparing their goal attainment portfolio. The final portfolio will be evaluated. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IS 200 and admission to the individual studies major.

    Credits: (1)

  
  •  

    IS 496 - Individual Study


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    IS 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)


Information Technology (IT)

  
  •  

    IT 101 - Computer Applications


    Description:
    Basic skills in Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentations. BAS6 Basic Skills F - Computing.

    Credits: (3)

    General Education Category
    BAS6 Basic Skills F - Computing.

  
  •  

    IT 228 - New Innovations in IT


    Description:
    Exploring information technology principles, practices, and applications in contemporary society.  Formerly IT 388, students may not receive credit for botth.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

    Learner Outcome

    Activity (optional)

    Assessment

    Describe information technology terminology, concepts, and innovations.  

     

    Exam and discussion board assignments

    Recognize emerging information technology hardware and software tools.
     

     

    Exam and discussion board assignments

     

    Demonstrate an understanding of current social, consumer, and commercial issues in information technology.

     

    Project with rubric graded assignment



  
  •  

    IT 238 - Introduction to Cyberterrorism


    Description:
    Exploration of the use of IT by terrorist groups and individuals to organize and execute attacks against computer systems and telecommunications infrastructure. The use of exchanging information or making threats electronically will also be examined.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 248 - Web Fundamentals


    Description:
    Development of web pages and internet skills for business, education, and training environments.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 258 - Spreadsheet Applications


    Description:
    Developing spreadsheets for business and workplace environments. Not intended for ITAM majors. Formerly ADMG 358 and IT 358. Students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 101 or CS 101.

    Credits: (3)

  
  •  

    IT 260 - Integrated Information Technology Application Projects


    Description:
    Developing word processing, spreadsheets, database, and presentation skills to create integrated projects for business and workplace environments. IT 260 and IT 360 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 101 or CS 101.

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    IT 288 - Business Presentation Applications


    Description:
    Develop multimedia graphic presentations for business and workplace environments. Not intended for ITAM majors.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 101 or CS 101.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

    Learner Outcome

    Activity (optional)

    Assessment

    Demonstrate knowledge of using software and storytelling tools for presenting ideas on a virtual canvas.

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Quizzes, projects and/or assignments.

    Demonstrate knowledge of using interactive portable documents across platforms.

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Quizzes, projects and/or assignments.

    Demonstrate knowledge of using content management systems for presentations.

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Quizzes, projects and/or assignments.

    Demonstrate knowledge of using internet conferencing systems.

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Quizzes, projects and/or assignments.

     

     

     

     

     

     



  
  •  

    IT 298 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    IT 301 - Information Technology Security, Privacy, and Ethics


    Description:
    Examination of information technology security and privacy issues in the context of law and ethics.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

    Credits: (3)

  
  •  

    IT 312 - Advanced Application of Web Tools


    Description:
    Advance website construction and design using contemporary tools and techniques.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 248.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

    Learner Outcome

    Activity (optional)

    Assessment

    Explain vector based graphics and multimedia formats.

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Quizzes, projects and/or assignments.

    Apply advanced HTML and CSS concepts.

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Quizzes, projects and/or assignments.

    Apply basic elements and principles of design to web sites

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Quizzes, projects and/or assignments.

    Explain site planning, scaling, and site specifications.

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Quizzes, projects and/or assignments.

    Demonstrate responsive design techniques for cross-media and cross-platform graphic applications using CSS.

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Quizzes, projects and/or assignments.

    Publish multipage web sites using a remote web server.

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Quizzes, projects and/or assignments.



  
  •  

    IT 322 - Innovative Design in Web


    Description:
    Design and implementation of the information technology infrastructure needed to operate a business Web site.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 312.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

    Learner Outcome

    Activity (optional)

    Assessment

    Explain site planning, scaling, and site specifications

     

    Develop and submit a proposal for a medium sized hierarchical designed web site

     

    Create original working code based in HTML

     

    Develop and submit out of class projects which make use of HTML

    Employ CSS for formatting text elements

     

    Develop and submit an out of class project which uses CSS classes to format text

    Employ CSS for page layout

     

    Develop and submit out of class projects which present content in static, liquid and elastic layouts

    Apply jQuery/Ajax components on a page, both with and without XML data

     

     

    Develop and submit out of class projects that use jQuery user interface elements

     

    Incorporate XML data (including linked and graphic) in a webpage

     

     

    Develop and submit out of class projects that link to a XML database

     

    Create and publish web pages that use linked external CSS style sheets

     

     

    Develop and submit a final out of class project that uses external style sheet

     

    Read and reconfigure or repurpose existing HTML and CSS code

     

     

    Exams



  
  •  

    IT 336 - Digital Forensics


    Description:
    Students will learn skills in digital forensics including how to analyze a device, retrieve “deleted” information, and methods of digital concealment.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 238 and IT 351.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 338 - Cybercrime


    Description:
    Investigate vulnerability of computer networks, systems, and computer applications. Learn methods of mitigation and/or prevention of cybercrime. Attributes of cybercrime such as virus attacks, identity theft, electronic funds transfers, and phishing will be examined.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 238 and IT 351.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 351 - Computer Networks


    Description:
    Computer network communications including LAN and WAN Topologies, Protocols and Services, such as TCP/IP, and Ethernet, within the context of the OSI Reference Model.  Formerly IT 452, students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: junior standing or above.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 359 - Advanced Spreadsheet Applications


    Description:
    Advanced spreadsheets for business applications such as design of multiple sheet workbooks and templates, advanced functions and formulas, enhanced formats, lists, and pivot tables.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 258 or IT 260.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

    Learner Outcome

    Activity (optional)

    Assessment

    Construct simple and compound statements and selected functions.

     

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Rubric based assignments, projects, and/or exams.

    Examine lists, data filters and subtotals.

     

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Rubric based assignments, projects, and/or exams.

    Employ macros.

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Rubric based assignments, projects, and/or exams.

    Apply What if analysis, goal seek, forecasts.

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Rubric based assignments, projects, and/or exams.

    Analyze data with Pivot Tables and Pivot Charts.

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Rubric based assignments, projects, and/or exams.

    Demonstrate the application of common statistical methods using spreadsheet formulas.

     

    Lectures, group work and lab work.

    Rubric based assignments, projects, and/or exams.



  
  •  

    IT 360 - Integrated Information Technology Application Projects


    Description:
    Developing word processing, spreadsheets, database, and presentation skills to create integrated projects for business and workplace environments. IT 260 and IT 360 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 101 or CS 101.

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    IT 362 - Wireless Communications


    Description:
    Broad introduction to wireless communications. Provides students with an exposure to a variety of technologies, standards, and concepts.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 351.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 365 - Data Driven Innovation


    Description:
    Introduction to data analysis techniques that enables real-time decision making in IT organizations.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 359.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

    Learner Outcome

    Activity (optional)

    Assessment

    Explain the role of machine learning in data mining.

     

    Written examination.

    Apply models and algorithms as used in data mining techniques

     

    Graded assignment.

    Analyze the value of data mining techniques used in the information technology field.

     

    Instructor graded assignment using a rubric.

    Evaluate visualization techniques used in data mining.

     

    Graded project with a rubric completed by faculty mentor and user.



  
  •  

    IT 376 - Project Management and Information Technology


    Description:
    IT project management with a focus on facilitating project management areas; risk management, procurement management, HR management, and communication management. Microsoft Project will be used.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: students must be junior standing or above.

    Credits: (3)

  
  •  

    IT 381 - Web Apps for M-Commerce


    Description:
    This course will introduce concepts in developing business web apps for use in m-commerce. Web apps review and development using web app authoring/application software for various operating systems.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 322.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    IT 425 - Reporting Data and Analytics


    Description:
    Skills and applications in pre-processing and preparing as well as presenting and reporting data for further analysis.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 365.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

    Learner Outcome

    Activity (optional)

    Assessment

    Apply push and pull approaches to analytics reporting

     

    Written examination.

    Interpret information about people in organizations in terms of its usefulness in strategic process decisions.

     

    Written examination.

    Construct actionable information by using tools to process large data sets.

     

     

    Written project.

    Evaluate potential solutions based on analytics data.

     

    Written project.

    Justify recommendations using data mining and analytics appropriate for a client-based environment.

     

     

    Rubric completed by faculty mentor and user.



  
  •  

    IT 426 - Application of Web Languages


    Description:
    Web languages for the non-computer science student.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 322.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 428 - Web Applications


    Description:
    Web application design using Web software such as Dreamweaver, Fireworks, and Flash.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 322.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 436 - Cyberattack/Defense


    Description:
    Examines the techniques and technologies for penetration of networks, detection of attacks, and the prevention of attacks. This course addresses the techniques, technologies, and methodologies used by cyberintruders.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 238 and IT 351.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 438 - IT Risk Management


    Description:
    Explores Networking Security from the perspective of risk management to develop strategies to mitigate and manage risks. Focuses on assessment strategies for effective mitigation measures and risk management practices in terms of cybersecurity.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 238 and IT 351.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 456 - Advanced Computer Network Management


    Description:
    Students will analyze network requirements, design network infrastructures, and install, configure and maintain routing and switching equipment.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 351.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 459 - Workstation Administration


    Description:
    Implementation, administration, and troubleshooting workstations as a desktop operating system in any network environment.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 351.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 461 - Systems Analysis


    Description:
    Feasibility studies of systems, cost analysis, budgets, and tools of systems analysis.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: senior standing.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 463 - Computer Network Management


    Description:
    Develop and improve network administration and management skills within a network server environment.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 351.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 464 - Directory Services


    Description:
    Students will plan, implement, and maintain directory service features including forests, sites, domains, and organizational units to meet network accessibility, performance, and security goals.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 463.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 465 - Messaging Service (Put on Reserve 9/16/16.)


    Description:
    Provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to install and support a reliable, secure e-mail messaging infrastructure in a medium-to large-sized (250 to 5,000 users) corporate environment.  (Put on Reserve 9/16/16. Last taught in 2013. Will go inactive 8/24/19.)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 463.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 466 - Open Source Server Management


    Description:
    Open Source Server Management covers the concepts required for Linux/UNIX server system administration and common networking services configuration, operation, and management.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 459.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 467 - Network Security


    Description:
    Analysis and design of computer network security in the business environment.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 463.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 468 - Projects in Database


    Description:
    Techniques in database design and management.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 260 or IT 268.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 469 - Enterprise Database Systems: SQL


    Description:
    Students will learn to write SQL statements, basic database administration, and report writing skills.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 468.

    Credits: (3)

  
  •  

    IT 481 - Quality Verification and Validation


    Description:
    System quality improvement through reviews, testing, and quality management.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IT 461.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    IT 486 - Critical Issues in Information Technology


    Description:
    This seminar format and case study course is intended to expose pre-graduation IT seniors to a variety of topics pertaining to the IT industry.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IT 301 and senior standing.

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  
    Learning Agreement Forms

    IT 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized, contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student-learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: RMT 379.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    IT 491 - Workshop


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  
  •  

    IT 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    IT 499 - Seminar


    Credits: (1-5)


Integrated Energy Studies (IEM)

  
  •  

    IEM 198 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    IEM 290 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    A pre-professional apprenticeship. An individualized field experience with energy companies and relevant governmental and non-governmental organizations to develop basic and advanced skills in energy management. The course involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: by permission of director of the institute for integrated energy studies.

    Credits: (1-10)

  
  •  

    IEM 301 - Energy Management


    Description:
    Principles and methods of energy management in residential, commercial and industrial settings, history of energy production; basics of energy supply and uses; energy conservation and efficiently in various settings; environmental, political and economic implications.

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    IEM 302 - Energy, Environment, and Climate Change


    Description:
    The course examines the physical principles behind climate change science and how they relate to energy and resource use on our planet. Emphasis placed on examining how energy decisions impact past, present, and future climates.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: GEOG 107.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

    Learner Outcome

    Activity (optional)

    Assessment

    Demonstrate knowledge of how the Earth’s climate system functions and how different factors (both natural and anthropogenic) influence the operation of that system.

     

    Through relevant exam questions in mixed formats (e.g., multiple choice, essay, short answer), each student will demonstrate mastery of selected climate change concepts.

    Explain how and why past climates vary from those of today and how energy production (in all forms) has influenced those climatic variations.

     

    Through relevant exam questions in mixed formats (e.g., multiple choice, essay, short answer), each student will demonstrate mastery of selected climate change concepts.

    Discuss and present how climate change is impacting Earth’s non-energy resources (i.e., freshwater supply, food supply, faunal/floral biodiversity, soils, etc.).

     

    Students will complete a group project that will draw upon primary and secondary literature to identify and interpret the impact of climate change on Earth’s non-energy resources and present those findings to the class.

    Identify and analyze how global energy production and consumption influences Earth’s current climate and scenarios of future climate change.

     

    Students will complete a 3-4 page paper that will draw upon primary and secondary literature to identify and analyze how human energy decisions are likely to influence Earth’s future climate.

    Collect data and evaluate the extent to which different countries/regions contribute to global climate change and how their energy production and consumption decisions play a role.

     

    Students will complete a 5-6 page paper that allows them to conduct research on a country/region’s energy production and consumption and how it contributes to global climate change.



  
  •  

    IEM 310 - Inquiry Science in Energy Management


    Description:
    Interdisciplinary investigation of applied life, physical, and earth science concepts applicable to secondary school classrooms using integrated contexts.  Applied inquiry processes are used to increase student knowledge, skills, and dispositions. 

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ECON 130 or MATH 130 or MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

    Learner Outcome

    Activity (optional)

    Assessment

    Describe and explain basic life (biology), physical (chemistry/physics), and earth science (geology) concepts relevant to energy science.

     

    Class discussion, research proposal, and research project.

    Design and implement experiments using investigative processes in energy science.

     

    Science notebook, mini-science investigations, research project, research presentations.

    Use computers and related technologies to gather and analyze data. 


     

     

    Mini-science investigations, research project, in-class exercises, performance assessment.

    Interpret and present data using quantitative reasoning including graphs, tables, and 
charts from scientific literature and hands-on scientific investigations. 


     

     

    Class discussion, science notebook, mini-science investigations, research project, written exams, in-class exercises, field trips.

    Work in small groups to solve complex problems relevant to energy science.

     

    Activity reports, instructor observation.

    Form opinions based on scientific evidence and defend positions using both written and oral methods.

     

    Class discussions, written exams, research projects.



  
  •  

    IEM 330 - Geopolitics of Fossil Fuels


    Description:
    Critical analysis of the geopolitical characteristics of fossil fuels. Course draws upon policy, historical data, production and consumption patterns, and political processes to understand the relationship between fossil fuels and geopolitical processes around the world. May be repeated up to 4 credits.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

    Learner Outcome

    Activity (optional)

    Assessment

    To demonstrate knowledge regarding the relationship between geopolitics and fossil fuels from a critical perspective

     

    Through relevant exam questions in mixed formats (e.g., essay, short answer, paired terms), each student will demonstrate mastery of the meanings of selected concepts and be able to apply them effectively in writing about real-world situations.

    To obtain and identify historical cognition of the conflictive history of fossil fuel production in the world

     

    Through relevant exam questions in mixed formats (e.g., essay, short answer, paired terms), each student will demonstrate mastery of the meanings of selected concepts and be able to apply them effectively in writing about real-world situations.

    To know and explain the different strategies used by petro-states to influence political decisions

     

    Students will complete a group project that will draw upon primary and secondary energy data (e.g. historical accounts, policy, production trends) to identify and interpret political decisions about energy issues.

    To asses specific energy resource issues (social, political, economic, environmental) and identify factors of concern regarding production, transportation, transformation, and consumption of fossil fuels

     

    Using historical, political, or case study data and information, students will use inductive and deductive reasoning to assess contemporary outcomes and demonstrate this knowledge on exams.

    Write effectively and analytically about current geopolitical issues as it relates to fossil fuels in a globalized world.

     

     

    Students will complete a 3-4 page paper that allow them to conduct research on a theme related to energy policy, energy issues, and geopolitical trends in the world.

    Present an original project in front of their peers

     

     

    Students will give a 20 minutes final presentation of the findings of their research.



  
  •  

    IEM 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    IEM 399 - Seminar


    Credits: (1-5)

  
  •  

    IEM 489 - Integrated Energy Management Capstone


    Description:
    Capstone course designed to assess student’s mastering of fundamental knowledge of energy management through a submission of a portfolio of work collected throughout the program. Exploration of future opportunities and exit interview with program director. Grade will be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admitted to integrated energy management major with senior standing.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

    Learner Outcome

    Activity (optional)

    Assessment

    Illustrate through familiarity with the discipline’s vocabulary, concepts and themes, and the complexity of energy systems, energy resources, and political-economic processes.

     

    Students will pass a comprehensive exam and submit various exercises and essays to demonstrate knowledge.

    Define and discuss historical and contemporary energy problems, policies, and processes in the field.

     

    Students will complete an oral presentation and participate in class discussions about different approaches and understandings of energy systems.

    Identify the patterns created through the interactions between human processes and energy systems (i.e. production, distribution, petrochemical transformations, and consumption) and the manner in which political and economic processes shape nature and society.  

     

    Students will submit a written and/or oral report on a contemporary energy issue or event using maps and other visual aids.

    Analyze the value of an interdisciplinary approach to analyze the social, political, economic, and environmental implications of energy systems and energy transition in the world.

     

    Students will submit a reflective essay on their development as Integrated Energy Management (IEM) majors, the requirements of the IEM program, and the quality of their training as energy managers.

    Identify professional opportunities and prospects for energy managers.

     

    Students will create a professional resume, identify potential employment opportunities, and practice interview skills.



  
  •  

    IEM 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    A pre-professional apprenticeship. An individualized field experience with energy companies and relevant governmental and non-governmental organizations to develop basic and advanced skills in energy management. The course involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: by permission of director of the institute for integrated energy studies.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    IEM 496 - Individual Study


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    IEM 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)


Interdisciplinary Studies (IDS)

  
  •  

    IDS 289 - Introduction to the Major


    Description:
    Introduction to the interdisciplinary studies major, interdisciplinary studies degree proposal design and preparation. By permission. Grade will either be S or U.

    Credits: (1)

  
  •  

    IDS 311 - Don’t Lie to Me: Contemporary Profiling


    Description:
    This course explores and examines the use of profiles is contemporary policing with a focus on violent crimes. The discussions and readings examine what criminal profiling is, what it accomplishes, and how it is utilized. Criminological theory and applicable research articles are used to examine the legitimacy of profiles and measures deception.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: PSY 101 or SOC 107.

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    IDS 321 - Body Image, Wellness and Popular Culture


    Description:
    This course focuses on body disturbances and how they affect wellness; including examination of how popular culture influences them. Various aspects, influences and assessments of body image will be used as the basis to develop an action plan to prevent and/or support individuals who experience them.

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    IDS 323 - Dangerous Women: Mad, Bad or Misunderstood


    Description:
    Violent crimes are generally associated with men; however, more and more women are becoming dangerous criminals. This class examines different theories behind violent women. Material will include cases of real-life female criminals, as well as fictional representations in movies and television.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PSY 101 or SOC 107.

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    IDS 343 - Origins and Results of Food Technology: The Gluttonous Human


    Description:
    As food production technologies have become increasingly complex, humans are now facing the adverse consequences as well as the benefits. This course explores the evolution of feeding strategies from Paleolithic until the present, including recent innovations such as, corporate farming, genetic modification of organisms and diseases of novel environments.

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    IDS 353 - National Parks and Reserves


    Description:
    This course focuses on the development of the National Parks, the Forest Services, and other land and marine reserves in the United States, as well as policies effecting them. The course also focuses on international parks and preserves, and varied models of natural and cultural resource management.

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    IDS 363 - The Simpsons: Social Institutions and National Community


    Description:
    The television show, “The Simpsons”, students will gain an understanding of the major themes and concepts that structure life for the members of the pluralistic American community.

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    IDS 369 - Living Voices of America: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Indigenous Women in the U.S.


    Description:
    This course will focus on Indigenous women in the United States from past to present day. There will be extensive coverage of Indigenous women’s daily roles and lives, including socialization, colonization, and social service issues. The course will also focus on methods of decolonization.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: ANTH 130 or PSY 101 or SOC 107 or SOC 301 or WGS 201 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

    Learner Outcome

    Activity (optional)

    Assessment

    Students will examine Indigenous women’s roles in historical, cultural, and regional contexts in the U.S.              

     

    Students will response to “talking points” on readings and video content for small group/class dialogue/discussion.”Talking points” responses will be submitted weekly.

    Students will investigate the ways that traditional knowledges and cultures have shaped Indigenous women’s identities and will consider the alliances that Indigenous women have built across national geographies.

     

    Students will make classroom presentations and facilitate class discussions based on selected reading materials.

    Students will explore gender issues within Indigenous communities, focusing on the effects of legislation on Indigenous women’s roles and the impact of colonization on gender practices.

     

    Students will demonstrate their analytical and critical thinking via journal responses summarizing and responding to some of the key points of the assigned materials. Journal entries will be submitted bi-weekly.

    Students will examine colonization through the prisms of Indigenous women’s life experience, exploring colonization issues and methods of decolonization.

     

    Students will submit a final comprehensive research paper which includes a discussion of colonization and decolonization in the lives of Indigenous women in the United States.

    Students will explore the role of social service organizations in the lives of Indigenous women in the United States.

     

    Students will submit a final comprehensive research paper which includes a discussion of social services agencies in the lives of Indigenous women in the United States.

     

     

     



  
  •  

    IDS 373 - The Purpose of the United States


    Description:
    Is the United States just another country, acting in its own national interest? Or does the United States have some long term global purpose? This course analyzes patterns in the American experience to answer these questions.

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    IDS 389 - Academic and Career Exploration


    Description:
    This course leads IDS-social sciences students in the development of a career/graduate school plan. Students will investigate the work world and/or graduate schools in terms of their academic and personal goals. Students will modify their IDS 289 program.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: IDS 289 and junior status or above.

    Credits: (3)

  
  •  

    IDS 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    IDS 405 - Essentials of Project Funding in the Social Sciences


    Description:
    Students enrolled in this course will be introduced to essentials of project funding specific to the social sciences disciplines. Course topics include defining the purpose and identifying the need for funding, completing a needs assessment, and identifying funding resources. Students will be required to submit a funding proposal. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: senior status and B or higher in ENG 102.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes, Activities and Assessments

    Learner Outcome

    Activity (optional)

    Assessment

    Define a problem or identify an opportunity for a funding.

     

    Students will research a problem/opportunity related to the Social Sciences by conducting a literature review, analyzing data and developing a problem statement for a potential funding proposal.

    Rubric completed by instructor and peers. The students’ problem statement will be evaluated on its clarity and conciseness, and how well the data and literature support it.

     

     

    Choose, assess and prioritize funding options.

     

    Students will create three project outlines and timelines based on actual funding opportunities.

    Graded worksheets.

     

    Prepare a viable funding proposal solution, including goals, objectives, outcomes and evaluation techniques.

     

    Students will propose an effective and practical solution for the problem statement.

    Rubric completed by instructor. Students will be evaluated on (1) how well their proposal adheres to the required content, (2) how relevant their research design/plan and evaluation process are, and (3) how well the plan and evaluation meet the  purpose of funding proposal.

     

    Propose a final and complete funding plan.

    Students will  present a final funding proposal to the class.

    Rubric completed by instructor and peers. Students will be evaluated on the description of the project, the research and use of strong examples-including data, valid sources, and specific stories-to create a compelling proposal, their awareness of the audience, their ability to include information appropriate to the funder and how well they follow the format of the funding proposal. Lastly, the proposal is expected to be well-organized, free of grammar and spelling errors.

     



  
  •  

    IDS 489 - Senior Portfolio Project


    Description:
    End-of-program assessment; preparation of comprehensive degree report and/or descriptive portfolio of project. Students must earn at least a C grade to pass this course. Students will enroll in IDS 489 no earlier that 2 quarters following successful completion of IDS 289. Instructor permission.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: IDS 289, student will have completed a minimum of 165 credits, and admission to the Interdisciplinary Studies: Social Sciences major.

    Credits: (1)

  
  •  

    IDS 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized, contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. By permission. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    IDS 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)


International Study (INTL)

  
  •  

    INTL 110 - Agriculture


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    INTL 115 - Business or Management


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    INTL 120 - Education


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    INTL 125 - Engineering


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    INTL 130 - Fine or Applied Arts


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    INTL 135 - Foreign Languages


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    INTL 140 - Health Sciences


    Description:
    May be repeated for credit under different subtitle. Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    INTL 145 - Humanities


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    INTL 150 - Law


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    INTL 155 - Math or Computer Sciences


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    INTL 160 - Physical or Life Sciences


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    INTL 165 - Social Sciences


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    INTL 198 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    INTL 210 - Agriculture


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    INTL 215 - Business or Management


    Description:
    Offered only in university-approved, study-abroad/exchange programs. Courses may be offered under different titles. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.

    Credits: (1-12)

 

Page: 1 <- Back 1015 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25Forward 10 -> 34