Jul 21, 2024  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Courses numbered from 101–299 are lower-division courses, primarily for freshmen and sophomores; those numbered from 300–499 are upper-division courses, primarily for juniors and seniors. The numbers 296, 396, 496, and 596 designate individual study courses and are available for registration by prior arrangement with the course instructor and approval of the department chair.

The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the amount of credit each course carries. Variable credit courses include the minimum and maximum number of the credits within parentheses.

Not all of the courses are offered every quarter. Final confirmation of courses to be offered, information on new courses and programs, as well as a list of hours, instructor, titles of courses and places of class meetings, is available online in My CWU which can be accessed through the the CWU home page, and go to www.cwu.edu/registrar/course-information

 

Dance (DNCE) Formerly PED

  
  • DNCE 311 - Music for Dance - Rhythms and Resources


    Description:
    A study of rhythmic concepts as related to dance movements and composition; an introduction to music resources emphasizing composer/choreographer collaborations. Course will be offered on odd numbered years (Fall). Formerly PED 211, students may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand basic rhythmic structure.
    • Learn how to play simple rhythm and percussion instruments.
    • Identify various types and styles of music.
    • Recognize composers of significance in the dance world.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 312 - Dance Performance


    Description:
    By audition. Participation in choreography for performances of the Orchesis Dance Company. May be repeated up to 18 credits. By permission of instructor. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, and Spring).

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Create original choreography for spring performance and teach through the rehearsal process to their peers.
    • Apply feedback from the rehearsal process to improve the compositional aspects of the performance piece.
    • Choreographic work is adjudicated and accepted in the yearly show.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 314 - Dance for Children


    Description:
    Strategies for teaching dance in elementary education, including creative dance, rhythmic exploration, use of props, unit plan development, and methods of assessment. Formerly PED 314, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, and Summer).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: current WSP/FBI fingerprint clearance.

    Credits: (3)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 315 - Teaching Methods: Modern and Ballet Dance


    Description:
    Teaching methods for modern and ballet technique classes which emphasizes the development of critical and creative thinking skills, observations skills, and assessment skills. May be repeated up to 8 credits. Formerly PED 315, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered on odd numbered years (Winter).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: DNCE 101 and DNCE 104.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Use the academic language of dance proficiently in planning and teaching.
    • Demonstrate dance technique and cue exercises correctly using musical accompaniment and counts.
    • Apply effective teaching skills in the classroom.
    • Develop an evaluation process for the dance classroom.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 360 - Dance Injury Prevention


    Description:
    The purpose of this course is to explore dance related injuries and their most common causes, analyze movement tendencies, and investigate research to reduce injury, expel myths and enhance performance. Course will be offered on odd numbered years (Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: DNCE 385.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate a working knowledge of fundamental body mechanics and principles of correct anatomical body alignment in order to train safely and efficiently.
    • Analyze common dance-related injuries and their causes.
    • Assess general principles of dance injury prevention as well as specific exercises to increase strength, flexibility, mobility and control in the dance classroom
    • Design a dance specific conditioning program using current research and resources.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • DNCE 385 - Principles of Functional Alignment for Dance


    Description:
    This course is a study of anatomical principles that apply to dance training and performance. Emphasis on optimal dance posture and efficient movement by gaining an understanding of the bones, joints and muscles in movement. Course will be offered on even numbered years (Spring). Formerly DNCE 355; a student may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe and diagram the interactions between muscles and skeletal structures, in relation to dance.
    • Assess incorrect vs. correct alignment in the dance technique class and how this relates to establishing a more informed movement practice.
    • Analyze and identify misalignment issues and muscular imbalances in the dance technique class.
    • Recognize the benefits of the use of somatic practices to enhance dance technique.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/3/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 398 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 401 - Choreography


    Description:
    The study and practice of choreographic techniques and tools utilizing creative problem solving. May be repeated up to 8 credits. Formerly PED 301, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered on on odd numbered years (Fall).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: DNCE 300.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe choreographic processes and approaches to creating movement.
    • Use choreographic structures and problem solving techniques in developing innovative movement sequences.
    • Use an integrated arts approach to create a dance work.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 402 - Dance Production


    Description:
    Aspects of organizing and mounting a dance production, including scheduling, programming, publicity, costuming, lighting, and sound design.  May be repeated up to 8 credits. Formerly PED 302, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered on even numbered years (Winter).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Determine the personnel needs and responsibilities required in producing a dance production.
    • Use the equipment involved in technical theatre by designing the lights for a piece of choreography.
    • Design printed material for a production, including a poster design, costumes designs, and a publicity release.
    • Define the technical language used to identify lighting equipment.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 420 - Capstone Project


    Description:
    Students will design an online portfolio developed on a personal website, which represents a comprehensive synthesis of the knowledge they have gained during their years in the program in the areas of choreography, research, and performance. By premission of instructor. Course will be offered every year (Winter, and Spring).

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Design a personal web site for an online portfolio.
    • Create an online portfolio that features student expertise in teaching, choreography, and performance.
    • Collect and assemble all components for the portfolio such as current vitae, teaching philosophy, video clips, etc.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/3/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 495 - Practicum


    Description:
    Dance teaching practicum. Students will teach dance in a variety of settings including K-12, private studios, special education and geriatrics. May be repeated up to 12 credits. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: DNCE 309 and DNCE 314 or DNCE 315 or permission of instructor.

    Credits: (1-4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply classroom principles to a practical experience working in a dance setting.
    • Identify and demonstrate an understanding of the policies and procedures needed to ensure a safe and effective working environment for students.
    • Demonstrate professional behavior appropriate to the situation.
    • Apply theory and principles to the work situations.
    • Evaluate knowledge and skills used in dance teaching through observation and applied application.

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 496 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 498 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DNCE 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Douglas Honors College (DHC)

  
  • DHC 102 - Articulating Honors: Research Writing in the Twenty-First Century


    Description:
    Introduces students to the academic expectations for DHC students; including writing essays, giving presentations, joining class discussions, and conducting research. Examines the philosophy, history, and debates surrounding honors education today, ultimately entering the discussion themselves. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: FYE2 - Academic Writing I: Critical Reading & Responding

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Read, summarize, and respond critically to source materials, identifying assertions, rhetorical strategies, and assumptions.
    • Identify conventional English grammar, usage, punctuation, and spelling; edit with confidence and accuracy; use citation and documentation effectively.
    • Describe the interrelationship between style and meaning in the writing of others and adjust style to enhance meaning in their own writing.
    • Prepare and implement a research plan that includes the evaluation of sources found by using the library, its research databases, and other relevant sources.
    • Effectively share their findings and ideas orally, through formal presentations as well as informal discussion.
    • Take a position on a question at issue by developing a focused assertion based on a shared assumption, synthesizing evidence in support of a line of reasoning, and addressing divergent stances on the issue.
    • Consider the role of honors within academic institutions

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 110 - Honors First Year Seminar: Foundation


    Description:
    Designed to assist students in identifying their unique areas of talent and strength. Using a focused developmental process, first-year honors students are supported in their transition to the university and the honors college. May be repeated up to 2 credits. Permission of department.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the four program pillars of the Honors College and demonstrate the integration of the pillars into academic course of study.
    • Identify and demonstrate the application of talents and strengths to curricular, extra-curricular and co-curricular experiences.
    • Describe and implement necessary skills to be a successful DHC and CWU student.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/3/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 140 - Humanistic Understanding I


    Description:
    Variable topic. Courses in the humanities focuses on the analysis and interpretation of human stories of the past, present, and future in order to understand the processes of continuity and change in individuals and cultures through both documented and imaginative accounts. May be repeatedfor credit.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K5 - Humanities

    General Education Pathways: P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze forms of literary, philosophical, historical or religious works from a variety of cultures.
    • Articulate ways in which beliefs and values including linguistic, religious, philosophical, and historical circumstances affect interpretations of human experiences and events.
    • Analyze and explain causes and effects within historical contexts and across historical periods
    • Investigate novel problems that necessitate identification of their own linguistic, conceptual and normative presuppositions.
    • Demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 150 - Aesthetic Experience I


    Description:
    Variable topic. Courses in this area explore questions about the nature of art; to understand, interrogate, and engage in the creative process; and to explore the connections between art, culture, and history. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K3 - Creative Expression

    General Education Pathways: P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Participate in imaginative and artistic creation using discipline-appropriate processes.
    • Engage in discourse with aesthetic experiences and expressions within the historical, artistic, and cultural traditions of the work under consideration
    • Apply aesthetic judgment and exhibit critical thinking to explain how works of art are appreciated and evaluated from different perspectives
    • Demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 180 - Physical and Biological Systems I


    Description:
    Variable topic. Courses in this area study physical and life systems, provide basic methods for rigorously describing the natural world, or treat social, economic, technological, ethical, or other implications of natural phenomena. May be repeated for credit under a different topic. Formerly DHC 160, students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K7 - Physical & Natural World

    General Education Pathways: P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Articulate how scientific methods and forms of inquiry can be used to describe phenomena and create evidence-based explanations of the natural world.
    • Recognize social, political, and ethical implications of scientific and/or mathematical discoveries and technological advancements.
    • Describe how scientific, technological, and/or mathematical developments contribute to our lives and create value.
    • Demonstrate strong analytical skills including quantitative reasoning and experimental techniques.
    • Demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 210 - Honors Sophomore Seminar: Take the Next Steps


    Description:
    Designed to further develop the knowledge, skills, and strengths students identified during their first year. Students participate in leadership and civic engagement opportunities throughout the course to continue their development as engaged campus leaders. May be repeated up to 2 credits. Permission of department.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate commitment to educational and developmental goals as refined through their first-year experiences
    • Participate in leadership and civic engagement opportunities appropriate to their interests
    • Consider their strengths and competencies as they relate to the development of pathways of interest and major and career exploration

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 250 - Social and Behavioral Dynamics I


    Description:
    Variable Topic. Courses focus on how individuals, cultures, and societies operate and evolve and introduce disciplined ways of thinking about individuals and groups. May be repeated for credit under a different topic.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K6 - Individual & Society

    General Education Pathways: P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify basic principles and institutions that underlie the cultures and traditions of groups, organizations, societies, and/or nations and apply these principles of human behavior for understanding self and others.
    • Analyze the implications of participation in social groups and institutions to consider ways they inform ethical interactions and contribute to social inequalities
    • Describe and interpret theories about individuals, social interactions and networks, or the relationships between individuals and society while applying critical thinking to specific situations involving personal and community decision-making.
    • Explain and apply diverse empirical methods, including quantitative and experimental techniques, to investigate and analyze individuals, groups, or societies.
    • Demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 260 - Cultural Studies I


    Description:
    Variable topic. Courses focus on negotiating cultural differences by applying appropriate patterns of understanding and behavior in culturally diverse settings. Courses focus on one or more non-dominant cultures or peoples of the United States. May be repeated for credit under a different topic.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K2 - Community, Culture, & Citizenship

    General Education Pathways: P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Articulate the requirements of informed citizenship based on analyses of social, cultural, economic and/or political processes, issues, and/or events.
    • Analyze the ways in which social, psychological, and/or culturally diverse experiences create value in a community and influence the community.
    • Analyze the reciprocal effects of governmental systems (local, national, regional, and/or global) and cultural notions of community and citizenship
    • Investigate the relationship of historical, social, economic, and/or cultural developments upon communities, citizenship, politics, and/or government.
    • Critically evaluate evidence of institutionalized cultural assumptions and their effect on individuals and groups.
    • Demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 261 - Cultural Studies II


    Description:
    Variable topic. Courses focus on negotiating cultural differences by applying appropriate patterns of understanding and behavior in culturally diverse settings. Courses focus on comparative cultures across national and continental boundaries. May be repeated for credit under a different topic.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K4 - Global Dynamics

    General Education Pathways: P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze and evaluate the impact of global interactions upon individuals, groups, communities, and nations.
    • Identify and describe global problems using interdisciplinary perspectives and conceptual models.
    • Critically evaluate evidence of institutionalized cultural assumptions and inequalities as they affect nations and their peoples.
    • Apply concepts and processes required for ethical decision making and efficacious civic engagement to address economic, social, and global/transnational concerns.
    • Demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 270 - Integrated Learning


    Description:
    Variable topic. Courses take an interdisciplinary approach to examining social, economic, technological, ethical, cultural, or aesthetic implications of knowledge. In addition to department courses that embrace multiple disciplines, these opportunities include learning community service learning and international studies courses. May be repeated for credit under a different topic.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Articulate an understanding of  the interconnectedness of modes of inquiry across disciplines.
    • Identify and explore connections between or among different disciplines to explain or inquire about phenomena.
    • Identify problems that require multidisciplinary approaches and critique current mitigation strategies or solutions.
    • Demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills (presentations and discussions) both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 280 - Physical and Biological Systems II


    Description:
    Variable topics exploring physical and life systems, provide basic methods for rigorously describing the natural world, or treat social, economic, technological, ethical or other implications of natural phenomena. Course includes experimentation in a laboratory setting. May be repeated for credit under a different topic. Formerly DHC 161, students mat not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K8 - Science & Technology

    General Education Pathways: P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply scientific methods and forms of inquiry to describe phenomena and create evidence-based explanations of the natural world.
    • Synthesize knowledge of basic scientific disciplines to examine large and complex physical and life systems and relate knowledge gained from natural sciences to other disciplines.
    • Employ knowledge of scientific disciplines to make informed decisions and address issues of human concern.
    • Demonstrate strong analytical skills including quantitative reasoning and experimental techniques.
    • Demonstrate effective use of written and oral communication skills both in form and structure within appropriate disciplinary conventions.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • Learning Agreement Forms

    DHC 290 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. Requires a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. By permission. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  
  • DHC 298 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DHC 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated for credit. By permission.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DHC 310 - Honors Seminar: Elements of Research


    Description:
    An exploration of research from a multidisciplinary perspective, including the formulation of a research question, organization of the research process, and preparation of DHC thesis or creative project proposal. May be repeated for credit. Formerly DHC 301, students may not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (3)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Formulate a feasible research question, problem statement, or aesthetic motivation for a capstone project.
    • Evaluate and assess appropriate sources for the research question, problem statement, or background and context for the aesthetic project.
    • Synthesize the pertinent literature and/or sources and demonstrate mastery of techniques for effective proposal writing including a detailed research plan or aesthetic design.
    • Convey their research plan or aesthetic design both in oral presentation and written document.
    • Constructively critique and review the research design and creative process of fellow students.
    • Reflect upon the knowledge, skills, and strengths developed through co-curricular and extra-curricular activities as they have informed each student’s curricular engagements. Identify and articulate the ways this integration of engagements has created identifiable strengths and avenues of inquiry that may inform the students’ capstone experience.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 380 - History of Science


    Description:
    Introduction to major themes in the history of science. Investigation of historical and scientific methods through the study of particular historical cases. May be repeated up to 8 credits with different sub-topics. Permission by department. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admittance to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the historical development of the scientific process.
    • Recognize the essential elements of a scientific investigation.
    • Apply the methods of scientific inquiry to issues of contemporary relevance.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/5/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  
  • DHC 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DHC 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DHC 399 - Interdisciplinary Honors Seminar


    Description:
    Interdisciplinary approach to examining current social, economic, ethical, and cultural issues. May be repeated for credit.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College. 

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DHC 401 - Honors Capstone Seminar


    Description:
    Skills and techniques for the presentation of the results of interdisciplinary research. Students prepare drafts of their DHC thesis or artist’s statement for their creative project as part of their coursework. Permission by department. Course will be offered every year (Fall).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: DHC 310 with at least a grade of B or higher and admittance to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Employ effective oral communication skills in describing the methodology and results of a research or creative project.
    • Effectively critique written and oral presentations of research.
    • Demonstrate effective writing style in describing the methodology and results of a research thesis.
    • Demonstrate effective writing style in preparing a draft of an artist’s statement which describes the work the student is currently engaged in and the concept or philosophy that motivates his/her creativity.
    • Demonstrate how and why the accurate representation of the work referred to or discussed in an artist’s statement is critical to the development and reception of a creative artist.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 410 - Honors Senior Seminar: Graduate and Career Preparation


    Description:
    Designed to provide development opportunities for students who are preparing to graduate. Students synthesize their honors and major/minor educational experiences to articulate a plan for postgraduation. May be repeated up to 2 credits. Permisison of department.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify connections among the variety of learning experiences undertaken during their undergraduate experience.
    • Have a well-developed career concept, pre-professional or pre-graduate plan and take steps to initiate implementation.
    • Articulate different leadership models and demonstrate their ability to move between them in different contexts.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 480 - Interdisciplinary Senior Seminar


    Description:
    Interdisciplinary approach to examining current social, economic, ethical, and cultural issues.  May be repeated up to 8 credits with different sub-topics. Course will be offered every year (Winter). Permission by department.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admittance to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Integrate learning by transferring theories or methodologies from one discipline to another, and to make connections through and across disciplines.
    • Develop solutions to contemporary problems that require multidisciplinary approaches.
    • Critique solutions to contemporary problems that require multidisciplinary approaches.
    • Assess, evaluate and articulate the influence and context of assumptions and to thoroughly question the viewpoints of experts.
    • Work effectively in teams to achieve a common purpose; maintain accountability to team members by meeting analytic and research responsibilities.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/5/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • Learning Agreement Forms

    DHC 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized, contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. Requires a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. By permission. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits. Grade will either be S or U.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  
  • DHC 497 - Honors Thesis and/or Creative Project


    Description:
    Students must complete a thesis or creative project approved by their faculty advisor and the DHC director and present at the DHC presentation event to receive credit for the course. Permission by department. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: students must pass DHC 310 and DHC 401 with a grade of cB or higher and admission to the Douglas Honors College.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Employ appropriate and effective writing skills that communicate the results of a research project, suitable for a peer-reviewed journal or thesis.
    • Demonstrate conformity to the established DHC thesis guidelines.
    • OR employ appropriate and effective creative skills that communicate the results of an art, music, theatre, or creative writing project, suitable for a peer-reviewed journal or juried artistic competition.
    • Demonstrate a level of mastery in their chosen creative medium/discipline.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between their creative project and chosen medium as expressed in their artist statement and creative project.
    • Employ appropriate and effective oral presentation skills that communicate the results of a research project or creative project.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/20/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg Winter Locations: Ellensburg Spring Locations: Ellensburg Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • DHC 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • DHC 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Economics (ECON)

  
  • ECON 101 - Economic Issues


    Description:
    For the student who desires a general knowledge of economics. Applications of economic principles to current social and political problems. ECON 101 cannot be substituted for either ECON 201 or 202. SB-Perspectives on Cultures and Experiences of U.S. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: SB-Perspectives on Cultures and Experiences of U.S. K2 - Community, Culture, & Citizenship

    General Education Pathways: P1 Civic & Community Engagement, P2 Health & Well-being, P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Articulate an understanding of basic microeconomic and macroeconomic concepts based on analysis of relevant theories, empirical evidence and current events, as applied to the US economy
    • Explain how economics values diverse economic activities and experiences in the US
    • Analyze local, regional and national institutional frameworks underlying the US economic system and relationships arising from it
    • Describe how economic developments in the US have shaped economic policy on issues such as healthcare, economic inequality, regulation

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/2/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 102 - World Economic Issues


    Description:
    An introduction to current international issues related to international trade and finance, economic development, and comparative economic systems. SB-Perspectives on World Cultures (W). Course will be offered every year (Fall, Spring).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: SB-Perspectives on World Cultures (W). K4 - Global Dynamics

    General Education Pathways: P1 Civic & Community Engagement, P2 Health & Well-being, P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate an ability to think critically in regards to global issues and its impacts on local, regional and national communities.
    • Demonstrate ability to analyze global economic outcomes such as economic inequality, global public health, economic institutions, global market structures, international migration, and global health.
    • Demonstrate an ability to identify, analyze and evaluate processes of globalization and the consequences of integrated economics in a historical context.
    • Develop ability to identify and address complex global economic issues using a variety of economic policy instruments, and more interdisciplinary approaches from other social sciences and humanities.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/2/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 130 - Foundations for Business Analytics


    Description:
    Role of mathematics, statistics and software to business and economic decision making; business and economics applications including indexing, percentage changes, compounding, financing, and accounting; probability theory and descriptive statistical analysis; modelling. Includes a lab component.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: a math placement test score resulting in placement into MATH 100C or successful completion of MATH 100B with a grade of C or higher.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: FYE3 - Quantitative Reasoning

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Develop critical thinking skills by applying basic components of logic to business decision making.
    • Demonstrate competence in basic mathematical modelling by using appropriate computer software to make practical business decisions.
    • Apply various quantitative methods used in business decision making to real world situations. Students will use appropriate software to make compounding, percentage calculations, index development, savings and mortgage calculations.
    • Demonstrate competence in basic probability theory by analyzing normal distributions and drawing conclusions from data.
    • Analyze simple data by developing summary statistics and graphs.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/6/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 201 - Principles of Economics Micro


    Description:
    Introduction to standard economic models used to examine how individuals and firms make decisions under different market structures; role of government in the economy in addressing market failure and efficiency equity tradeoff. SB-Perspectives on Cultures and Experiences of U.S. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: SB-Perspectives on Cultures and Experiences of U.S. K6 - Individual & Society

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P5 Sustainability, P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe how individuals and businesses interact in various market structures to determine price and quantity of a good produced
    • Identify major characteristics of different market structures and the implications for the behavior of the firm.
    • Articulate the difference between efficiency and equity, and implications of this tradeoff on government policy such as social welfare, environmental policy, health insurance, retirement.
    • Analyze the difference between economic systems such as capitalism and socialism.
    • Apply both theoretical and empirical economic reasoning to individual and firm behavior.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/2/17

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 202 - Principles of Economics Macro


    Description:
    Organization of the U.S. economy, structure, and role of the monetary system, problems of employment and inflation, overall impact of government spending and taxation on the economy. Economic growth, world economic problems, and a comparison of capitalism with other economic systems. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ECON 201.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: K4 - Global Dynamics

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P5 Sustainability, P6 Ways of Knowing

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Develop an ability to graphically model and analyze present, historical, global and national macroeconomic issues
    • Demonstrate an understanding of economic and institutional factors determining global differences in economic growth
    • Demonstrate an understanding of concepts and processes underlying the relationships between the following macroeconomic and global variables:
      • GDP (real and nominal)
      • Sources of economic growth (including capital accumulation, technological innovation, and productivity growth)
      • Inflation
      • Unemployment
      • Fiscal policy (including government spending, taxation, budget deficits, and national debt)
      • Monetary policy (including money supply, interest rates, and the structure of the U.S. banking system)
      • Consumption spending, saving, wealth, and investment
      • Exchange rates, exports, and imports
    • Develop ability to apply economic theory addressing contemporary macroeconomic and global policy issues

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/21/04

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 298 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 306 - Gender in the Economy


    Description:
    Gender in business. Effects of gender on labor market outcomes, educational attainment, earnings, and occupations. Topics include family formation, changing work roles, labor force participation, gender gap in wage earnings, and occupational choices.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Investigate how gender roles affect business operations
    • Apply basic economics framework to evaluate gender related issues
    • Evaluate demographic data related to socioeconomic status to isolate the effect of the impact of gender differences on economic development and demographic change
    • Analyze the implications of non-market activities such as family formation, changing work roles, and family well-being on labor market outcomes
    • Examine policy responses to gender differences in economic outcomes such as labor force participation, educational attainment, wage earnings, occupational choices, labor supply and demand, and labor market outcomes

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/31/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • ECON 308 - Sports Economics


    Description:
    This course applies microeconomic principles and game theory to analyze a range of issues in the sports industry. Economic impact of sports teams and facilities, labor relations, athlete compensation, market structure, sports analytics, pricing, regulations.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:

    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the key economic issues in professional sports.
    • Use microeconomic principles to analyze various market structures found in the sports industry including monopsony power of team owners, sports leagues as cartels, tax subsidies for sports teams.
    • Examine regulations governing the sports industry including antitrust laws, drug policies, special legal treatment of leagues.
    • Apply game theory tools to understand athlete salary negotiations, labor relations, game play, and strategy. 
    • Identify sources for sports data and use it to conduct economic analysis.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/5/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg

  
  • ECON 310 - International Economics


    Description:
    International trade and monetary theories; analyzing economic relationships and adjustments within and among trading nations; specialization, tariffs, balance of payments, and international monetary systems. Course will be offered every year (Winter).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ECON 201.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze the basis for international trade.
    • Justify the case for free trade and assess the case for trade protectionism.
    • Examine the balance of payments system.
    • Examine the foreign exchange market.
    • Analyze the determinants of exchange rates.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/15/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 325 - Introduction to Forecasting


    Description:
    An introduction to methods employed in business and econometric forecasting. Topics include time series modeling, Box-Jenkins models, and seasonal adjustments. Covers data collection methods, graphing, model building, model interpretation, and presentation of results.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: ECON 202 and either MATH 153, MATH 154, MATH 170, MATH 172, or MATH 173.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    Master the microeconomic and macroeconomic principles that are used to interpret economic and business forecasts.
    Demonstrate knowledge of mathematical tools that are used to prepare economic and business forecasts.
    Show competence in using computer software packages to complete forecasting applications.
    Demonstrate the ability to interpret their economic and business forecasts and explain them to others.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/18/07

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
  • ECON 330 - Money and Banking


    Description:
    The supply of money and the Federal Reserve System; financial intermediaries and financial instruments; macroeconomic theory and policy.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ECON 202.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 332 - Public Finance


    Description:
    Rationale of public sector; effect of government expenditure and taxation on resource allocation and income distribution; structure of federal, state, and local tax systems. Emphasis is on current policy problems.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ECON 202.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 333 - Behavioral Economics


    Description:
    Behavioral economics examines how psychological factors affect individual and organizational decision making. It departs from standard economics assumptions of rationality, and the course examines implications for public policy, touching on related research in experimental economics. Course will be offered every year (Winter).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ECON 201.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Compare and contrast behavioral economic theories to standard economic theories based on rational decision making.
    • Examine common heuristics and biases (anchoring, availability, etc.) in economic decision making.
    • Demonstrate how behavioral economics can be used to improve individual decision making and how it can be used in economic policy making.
    • Evaluate the advantages and limitations of behavioral economics.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/15/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 348 - Economic Development of the United States


    Description:
    Economic factors in the development of the American nation from the European background to the present.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the factors that have influenced the pace of long run economic growth in the American economy
    • Recognize the key institutional, organizational, political, social, and cultural changes that have influenced the course of American economic development
    • Evaluate, analyze and support a position regarding issues found in American economic history
    • Incorporate critical thinking skills in the evaluation and communication of issues reflected in American economic history.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/05/15

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 349 - Economic Development of Asia


    Description:
    This course analyzes the post-war economic development of Asia. Dubbed the “Economic miracle of the 20th century” by the World Bank, the rapid economic rise of China, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea, India, and Singapore will be covered. Topics will include industrialization, state-society relations, labor migration, and the environment.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the major forces, both global and regional, that have affected the post-war economic development of Asia
    • Compose concise and coherent essays.
    • Identify the business systems in several Asian countries, how and why they are similar and/or different, the relationship of the business systems to the history and culture of that nation, and the special business advantages of each nation.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/05/15

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 352 - Managerial Economics


    Description:
    Application of microeconomic theories to managerial decisions and planning utilizing the case method.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: ECON 202 and BUS 221.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Use marginal analysis to critically analyze problems; and demonstrate the efficiency of this analytical tool by building scenarios in which this method of analysis can be used to develop optimum managerial decisions.
    • Demonstrate a probability theory. The student  must be able to analyze statistical data, and interpret regression results.
    • demonstrate an ability to use calculus to interpret economic models and equations; and hence analyze complex empirical equations.
    • Explain and interpret using economic theories, economic scenarios which generate alternative solutions. They will be asked to compare and contrast the different equilibrium solutions and decide on the optimum solution.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/05/15

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 355 - Economics of Labor


    Description:
    Economics of the labor market, labor, productivity, investment in human capital, manpower problems, and public policy.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ECON 202.

    Credits: (5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 401 - Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis


    Description:
    Markets as mechanisms for organizing and directing human activities; production of goods and services; the allocation of labor, capital, and natural resources to various productive activities; and the distribution of income. Relationship between microeconomics theory and contemporary thought, practical problems and government policies.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ECON 201.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Use demand and supply models to analyze a variety of changes in market circumstances and government policies.
    • Develop theory of demand from assumptions concerning consumer preferences and income constraints.
    • Develop theories of cost and supply from underlying production relationships and input prices.
    • Analyze the effect of changes in market structure on firm behavior.
    • Describe the nature of economic efficiency and its relationship to market structure.
    • Use economic efficiency to analyze the effects of government policy on markets.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/18/07

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 402 - Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis


    Description:
    Analysis and measurement of U.S. national income and product accounts; determinants of income, employment and prices under the Classical and Keynesian systems; problems of inflation, economic growth and stabilization policy.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ECON 202.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate the income-expenditure and IS-LM models; theories of consumption; investment and economic growth; expectations and economic policy in an open economy.
    • Use macroeconomic models to interpret policy problems and questions.
    • Know of the main contributions of the leading school of macroeconomic thought, as well as areas of agreement and remaining controversy.
    • Demonstrate the structure and use of macroeconomic models; they will evaluate alternative economic models using both economic theory and empirical results.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/18/07

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 406 - Business Analytics


    Description:
    Introduction to business analytics methods, approaches and tools. Students develop skills in: descriptive and predictive analytics methods; software tools for business analytics; forecasting; optimal analysis method selection.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: BUS 221 or MATH 211 or PSY 362 or SOC 363.

    Credits: (5)

    General Education Category: CE - Culminating Experience

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Employ business analytics techniques (descriptive, predictive and prescriptive) to analyze common business problems.
    • Calculate, describe and analyze relevant business metrics (ex. sales, costs, market conditions, etc.) using appropriate software.
    • Predict values of relevant business metrics (sales, costs, market conditions, etc.) using appropriate software.
    • Propose data driven prescriptions of business problems based on descriptive and predictive business analysis.
    • Integrate knowledge and skills from undergraduate courses in analytics, writing and General Education
    • Synthesize and present a business analytics/economics report based on individual creative work

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/21/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Spring Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • ECON 424 - Introduction to Econometrics


    Description:
    Evaluation of economic models and forecasting of economic variables using multiple regression techniques and cross sectional data. Brief introduction to advanced techniques which may include IV, time series, logit and probit, or panel data methods. Formerly ECON 324, students my not receive credit for both.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: BUS 221 or MATH 211 or PSY 362 or SOC 363.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Construct a linear econometric model that may be used to evaluate the validity of an economic model.
    • Enter data into regression software packages, and use that data to estimate linear econometric models.
    • Determine the statistical significance of variables in linear econometric estimations.
    • Forecast the value of dependent variables for given values of independent variables.
    • Test and correct for heteroskedasticity.
    • Identify functional form misspecification, including omitted variable bias, and correct for misspecification with additional variables, proxy variables, and instrumental variables.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/7/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg
  
  • ECON 426 - Economic Research


    Description:
    Students will undertake several applied economics research projects, drawn from the entire spectrum of economic fields (including, potentially, general business and finance.) Project results will be presented both in writing and orally.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: ECON 202 and BUS 221.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Model, and analyze, applied economic topics drawn from the spectrum of economic fields (including general business and finance.)
    • Orally present the results of their research.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/01/13

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 462 - Environmental and Resource Economics


    Description:
    Economics of environmental issues and natural resource management; economic implications of environmental policies and regulations. Topics in economics of pollution, land, water, recycling, and benefit-cost analysis.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ECON 201.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of methods used in environmental valuation including revealed and stated preferences methods.
    • Demonstrate the ability to apply basic benefit-cost analysis to environmental and resource policy decision making.
    • Show competence in using optimal resource extraction methods.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of historical and current issues in the economics of pollution including issues of water, toxics, air and climate change.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of historical and current issues in the economics of natural resource extraction and conservation including issues of land, water, forests, mining, fisheries, recycling and agriculture.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/16/12

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 463 - Energy Economics


    Description:
    Theoretical and empirical perspectives on economics of energy; political economy of energy supply and demand; regulation in energy sector; analysis of prevalent market structures; economics of oil, coal, electricity generation, natural gas and alternative energies.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: ECON 201.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Master the microeconomic principles that are used to analyze energy markets.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of historical and current issues in the economics of energy including issues of energy regulation, privatization, externalities, production and distribution.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of historical and current issues associated with the economics of coal, nuclear, natural gas, oil, and alternative energy industries.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/16/12

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • Learning Agreement Forms

    ECON 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    An individualized, contracted field experience with business, industry, government, or social service agencies. This contractual arrangement involves a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. By permission. May be repeated for credit. Grade will either be S or U.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 493 - Economics Boot Camp


    Description:
    Supervised field experience focused on economics related organizations and processes. On-location industry engagement. Education, training, and business skills application in industry setting. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Grade will either be S or U. Permission of instructor. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Prepare a research brief on each organization participating in the boot camp
    • Exhibit professional behavior and appropriate business skills in industry setting.
    • Establish a professional network within the industry professionals
    • Illustrate an awareness of the organization(s) participating in the boot camp.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  
  • ECON 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • ECON 499 - Seminar


    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

Education: Bilingual (EDBL)

  
  • EDBL 212 - Cultural Literacies, Society, and Schooling


    Description:
    Discussion on research on linguistic, social and community issues pertaining to cultural literacies, the global/national communities and education policies in schooling.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Investigate issues dealing with history of American education and policies concerning to education and human rights
    • Identify/analyze diversity issues in education in relation to cultural literacies, and globalization
    • Analyze the interaction of language development, second language acquisition, cognitive development, academic progress, and sociocultural contexts
    • Explain the concept of “literacies” and the implications of bilingualism, second language acquisition, cognitive development, academic progress
    • Examine and critique programs/policies in existence in regards to the participatory needs for all students/learners, based on the local contexts

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/23/19

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg, Online Winter Locations: Ellensburg, Online Spring Locations: Ellensburg, Online Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  • EDBL 250 - Ethnic and Cultural Minorities in American Education: Past and Present


    Description:
    This course will provide students the opportunity to explore, analyze, and present information related to the educational experiences of ethnic and cultural minorities in America. This will include both historical and contemporary conditions. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter).

    Credits: (4)

    General Education Category: K2 - Community, Culture, & Citizenship

    General Education Pathways: P3 Perspectives on Current Issues, P4 Social Justice

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate comprehension of historical conditions of minorities in American education system.
    • Analyze and present information on historical and contemporary issues of minorities in American education system.
    • Formulate a plan to improve a current condition of minorities in American education system.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/18/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • EDBL 289 - Career Writing Seminar for Teacher Candidates


    Description:
    In this seminar, teacher candidates will augment the skills required by the Common Core writing standards, and will prepare to implement the best practices in teaching writing across the curriculum in K-12. Grade will either be S or U. Permission of department. EDBL 289 and ENG 289 are cross-listed courses; a student may not receive credit for both.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain and apply the gradual release of responsibility instructional framework applied to their grade level and content area.
    • Write essays in 3 different genres - explanatory, narrative, and argumentative.
    • Demonstrate their ability to accurately use the conventions of written English.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/16/20

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
    Fall Locations: Ellensburg, Online Winter Locations: Ellensburg, Online Spring Locations: Ellensburg, Online Summer Locations: Ellensburg, Online
  
  
  • EDBL 298 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • EDBL 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • EDBL 312 - Foundations in Bilingual Education


    Description:
    Introduction to the education of students whose primary language is other than English. Research on linguistic, social and community issues pertaining to bilingualism and bilingual education. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain orally and in writing these concepts and issues related to bilingual education: nature of bilingualism, second language acquisition, interaction of bilingualism and intelligence.
    • Identify and critique ways in which educational policy affects educational practice in situations involving children who are culturally and linguistically different.
    • Examine, critique, and develop recommendations related to program design and implementation.
    • Develop and implement a plan for researching an issue of importance in the area of bilingual education and bilingualism.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • EDBL 318 - Family, Community, and Culture in Education


    Description:
    This course will explore the impact of families, communities, and culture on the educational experiences of students. Particular focus will be on the families and communities of diverse populations. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: Conditional admission to the Teacher Certification Program or completion of the Teacher Certification Waiver letter.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the concept of culture and its relationship to classroom instruction.
    • Advocate for the active involvement of diverse families and communities in school.
    • Challenge existing cultural misconceptions within the community and/or school that may limit opportunities of linguistically diverse students. 

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/3/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  
  • EDBL 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • EDBL 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • EDBL 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • EDBL 401 - Principles and Practices for Educating Linguistically Diverse Students


    Description:
    Required coursework that provides the fundamental background in language and learning theories needed to educate linguistically diverse students. The basics of sheltered instruction are introduced. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: PSY 314 and [EFC 250 OR (EFC 210 AND EFC 310)] with a grade of C or higher and full admission to the Teacher Certification Program.

     

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Utilize classroom‑based theories leading to methodologies by documenting second language acquisition (SLA) and learning theories needed for implementing instruction in the classroom.
    • Explain and apply the relationship between the theories and classroom practices.
    • Utilize sheltered instruction methodology to improve the educational experiences of linguistically diverse students by preparing lesson plans that include methods and techniques needed by ESL students.
    • Facilitate interactions between ESL and English speaking students.
    • Use the Washington State English Language Development guidelines to assist in making appropriate modifications to learning events.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/19/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:

  
  • EDBL 430 - Sheltering Instruction for Linguistically Diverse Students


    Description:
    This course provides teacher candidates the basic competencies and skills needed to make appropriate modifications and accommodations for linguistically diverse students in content area instruction.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: students must be admitted to the bilingual education/TESL minor or teaching English as a second language minor.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student/teacher candidate will be able to:

    • Identify and articulate the appropriate theoretical basis for sheltering strategies and techniques
    • Identify effective sheltering strategies and techniques
    • Modify and/or adapt existing curriculum to create curriculum appropriate for English Language Learners using a variety of sheltering techniques and strategies
    • Use English Language Proficiency Standards to guide instructional practices.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/04/14

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • EDBL 433 - Educational Linguistics


    Description:
    Phonology, syntax, and semantics applicable to speech and learning situations in the school. Not recommended for undergraduates with no teaching experience.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: full admission to the Teacher Certification Program.

    Credits: (3)

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • EDBL 435 - Bilingual Education in the Content Areas


    Description:
    Designed to develop teacher competency related to the bilingual instruction of coursework in language arts, social studies, science and mathematics in both English and Spanish. The use of ESL in these content areas is emphasized. Taught in English and Spanish.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Certification Program.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain orally and in writing different manners of organizing and presenting bilingual instruction.
    • Identify and implement effective instructional practices used in providing effective learning opportunities in bilingual settings.
    • Examine, critique, and develop recommendations related to course materials and texts in a bilingual setting.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/19/12

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • EDBL 438 - Teaching English as a Second Language


    Description:
    Prepares teachers in the development and practice of research-based methods and techniques used to assist K-12 English Language Learners in acquiring academic English. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Apply appropriate methodologies and applications.
    • Apply appropriate teaching strategies and skills.
    • Assist ESL students in integrating into mainstream school setting.
    • Apply fundamental theories and principals upon which effective practices are based.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/19/18

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
  
  • EDBL 439 - Assessment of Linguistically Diverse Students


    Description:
    This course prepares students to use effective assessment programs and techniques with linguistically diverse students in order to improve identification, reclassification, and teaching of such students.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to the Teacher Certification Program.

    Credits: (3)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student/teacher candidate will be able to:

    • Document understanding of procedures used for identification, placement, and reclassification of linguistically diverse students
    • Document understanding of classroom based assessment procedures needed to document student progress in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and academic content.
    • Document understanding of testing bias, as those procedures that can be used to limit such bias.

    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/19/12

    Anticipated Course Offering Terms and Locations:
 

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