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2015-2016 Undergraduate Catalog
Central Washington University
   
 
  Dec 12, 2017
 
 
    
2015-2016 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Ethics Minor


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A minor in ethics enables students to develop a strong sense of moral responsibility and critical skills for moral reflection. It consists of required courses in global ethics or current ethical issues, coursework in philosophical ethics, as well as interdisciplinary electives. It also includes a capstone project to help students develop their ethical ability and awareness through service learning, a research or creative project. Such a minor can be combined with, and serve as enrichment to, any major program.  As a result of completing the minor, students will be able to:

  • Identify and implement major moral theories from diverse traditions
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the cultural and historical embeddedness of ethical theories
  • Evaluate moral issues from a plurality of perspectives
  • Develop a capacity for critical moral reasoning
  • Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of given moral theories in dealing with contemporary ethical problems
  • Learn to account for one’s conduct within a larger community
  • Develop a sensitivity to the central moral issues in a given discipline and the capacity to act in a morally responsible manner 

 

Required Courses Credits: (7)


Courses in Philosophical Ethics Credits: (10)


 Choose two courses from the following:

Electives Credits: (8-10)


No more than 5 credits can be taken from one discipline.

Total Credits: 25-27


Philosophy and Religious Studies Department Information


College of Arts and Humanities
Ellensburg
Language and Literature Bldg., room 337
Mail Stop 7555
509-963-1818
Fax 509-963-1822
www.cwu.edu/philosophy
See website for how these programs may be used for educational and career purposes.

Faculty and Staff
Chair

Matthew Altman, PhD

Professors
Cynthia Coe, PhD, 20th century continental philosophy, feminist philosophy, 19th century philosophy, critical race theory
Jeffrey Dippmann, PhD, world religions, Chinese Buddhism, Daoism; director of Asia/Pacific studies

Associate Professors
Matthew Altman, PhD, Kant, ethics and applied ethics, 19th century philosophy, social and political philosophy, philosophy of law, philosophy of art
Gary Bartlett, PhD, philosophy of mind, philosophy of science, cognitive science, epistemology

Assistant Professor
Michael Goerger, PhD, ethical theory, ancient Greco-Roman philosophy, applied ethics, social and political philosophy

Visiting Assistant Professor
Anne Blankenship, PhD, religion and politics, Christianity, new religious movements, religion in America

Senior Lecturer
Karen Turcotte, MA, philosophy and world religions, women/gender and religion, philosophy of humor

Lecturers
Michelle Carpenter, PhD, ancient Greek philosophy, ethics
Michael Fletcher, PhD, history of modern philosophy (Kant), philosophy of mind, logic and critical thinking, history of Western philosophy
Geraldine O’Mahony, MDiv, MA, African politics and development, politics, Islamic studies, divinity

Staff
Kristy Magdlin, secretary senior

Department Information
The original meaning of the word philosophy is “the love of wisdom.” Philosophy therefore represents an ongoing process of critical and speculative inquiry into questions representing people’s deepest concerns, such as the meaning of existence, the nature of reality, and the grounds of human conduct. The religious studies specialization is a path of inquiry into the nature of religion, its pervasive role in human life, and its contribution to understanding human existence.

Bachelor of Arts
Philosophy Major

Students may choose either a 50-credit major or a 62-credit major. In order to graduate, a student who completes the 50-credit major must also have a minor or second major in another discipline. A student who completes the 62-credit major is not required to have a minor or second major.

Maximum Credit Overlap
No more than 10 credits of coursework counting toward any of the department’s major or minor programs may also be counted toward one of the department’s other programs.

Departmental Honors in Philosophy and Religious Studies
The honors program in Philosophy and Religious Studies recognizes the exceptional scholarship of qualified students in either the Philosophy major or the Religious Studies specialization. To qualify, students must have completed at least 25 credits in their major or specialization and have a minimum GPA of 3.0 overall and 3.5 in their major coursework.

In addition to their normal coursework, students seeking departmental honors must take one additional upper division course in their program, complete a superior thesis (PHIL 497 or RELS 497: Honors Thesis) to be evaluated by a second reader from the departmental faculty, and make an oral presentation. Students graduating with honors will have that accomplishment recorded on their transcripts.

Bachelor of Arts
(NOTE: Students seeking a BA degree must complete one year college/university study or two years high school study of a single world language.)

College of Arts and Humanities Information


Administration and Organization

Dean
Stacey Robertson, PhD (Hebeler Hall, room 202)

Interim Associate Dean
Katharine Whitcomb, PhD (Hebeler Hall, room 202)

Mail Stop 7518
509-963-1858
Fax: 509-963-1851
www.cwu.edu/arts/

Overview
The College of Arts and Humanities (CAH) is comprised of 12 departments and programs, which represent the disciplines of the arts and humanities. All of the departments and some of the programs of CAH offer undergraduate degrees as well as minors which supplement other degree programs. Five departments offer Master’s degrees. In addition to its role in providing degree programs, CAH is responsible for many of the course offerings of the general education programs as well as extensive service coursework for the entire university. The college also plays a major role in Central’s teacher education programs, offering bachelors and master’s degrees for students preparing to be secondary teachers and providing coursework in educational foundations and discipline-specific methods for teacher education majors. Building on a legacy of teaching excellence, college faculty are engaged in research, creative activities and service, involving students in the scholarship and practical applications of their various academic specializations, while making important contributions to the intellectual tradition and to society at large. There are no special requirements for admission to the college, but some departments have requirements that are described under the respective department and program headings in the catalog.

Mission
The College of Arts and Humanities advances knowledge, promotes intellectual inquiry, and cultivates creative endeavor among students and faculty through teaching informed by scholarship, creative activity, and public and professional involvement. We are committed to helping students develop intellectual and practical skills for responsible citizenship and the challenges of contemporary life in a global society. The college offers disciplinary and interdisciplinary programs of the highest quality, acts as a steward of the foundational disciplines upon which all inquiry is based, and serves as a cultural center for arts and humanities for the university and the region.

Vision
The College of Arts and Humanities will be recognized as a distinguished learning community known regionally for scholarly and creative excellence, innovative, and rigorous foundational liberal arts education, and undergraduate and graduate programs that are outstanding and unique in the state.

Departments and Programs
Africana and Black Studies Program: Bobby Cummings, PhD (Michaelsen Hall, room 104)
Art: Gregg Schlanger, MFA (Randall Hall, room 100)
Asia/Pacific Studies Program: Jeffrey Dippman, PhD (Language and Literature Bldg., room 337C)
Communication: Marji Morgan, PhD (Bouillon Hall, room 232A)
English: George Drake, PhD (Language and Literature Bldg., room 423)
Film and Video Studies Program: Liahna Armstrong, PhD  and Jon Ward (Bouillon Hall, room 225)
History: Jason Knirck, PhD (Language and Literature Bldg., room 100)
Latino and Latin American Studies Program: Stella Moreno, PhD (Language and Literature Bldg., room 102J)
Music: Todd Shiver, DMA (Jerilyn S. McIntyre Music Building, room 144)
Philosophy and Religious Studies: Matthew Altman, PhD (Language and Literature Bldg., room 337)
Theatre Arts: Scott Robinson, MFA (McConnell Hall, room 106)
World Languages: Laila Abdalla, PhD (Language and Literature Bldg., room 102)

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