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  Oct 20, 2017
 
 
    
2015-2016 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Cultural and Environmental Resource Management, MS


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Program: The program is interdisciplinary, emphasizing understanding of problems encountered in the management of both natural and cultural resources. It includes a basic core of 27 credits in resource management, courses in areas of interest and a specialty track in either natural resource areas (management of land, water, biotic, atmospheric, and energy resources) or cultural resources management (ethnographic and archaeological sites and materials, historic properties, and archives). An internship is recommended. Students must complete at least 60 credits as outlined in an approved course of study filed with the Office of Graduate Studies and Research. The course of study is selected by advisement before completing 25 credits.

Program Admission Requirements: In addition to general master’s degree regulations for admission to master’s programs, applicants for admission must have the following qualifications:

  1. A solid background in a discipline closely related to the resources they expect to manage. Normally, a bachelor’s degree is required in a technical field such as one of the biological, Earth, or physical sciences, geography, engineering, archaeology, ethnology, history, or architecture. In some cases work experience may be accepted in lieu of a technical major. Before admission, program faculty will evaluate the academic coursework and experience of all applicants for admission, and will recommend remedial course work if, in their judgment, there are deficiencies in pre-baccalaureate work which need to be overcome before entrance into the program.
  2. A high proficiency in written and spoken English as well as potential for post-graduate study and research. Evidence of proficiency and potential may include: GRE scores, samples of previous writing, letters of recommendation, an interview.
  3. A good background in basic statistics (the equivalent of two quarters of undergraduate statistics), knowledge of microeconomic principles, and some knowledge of computer systems (the equivalent of a one-quarter undergraduate course).

Admission to the program and continuation in it may be conditional on the applicant’s satisfactory completion of remedial courses. Such courses will not count toward the program credit requirement but in some cases they may be taken after admission to the program.
Application Deadline and Materials: students must comply with all deadlines and procedures for “applying to CWU” in the graduate admissions section of this catalog.

Required Core Courses


  • ECON 462 - Economics of Energy, Resources and Environment Credits: (5)

Subtotal Credits: 27


Additional Courses


  • Electives (to be selected by advisement): Natural Resource or Cultural Resource Management Credits: 27

Total Credits: 60


Additional Information


Graduate Committee: The student will have at least a three-member graduate committee, to be selected in consultation with the program coordinator and the dean of Graduate Studies and Research.

Final Examination: Each candidate must pass a final oral examination on all phases of his or her program including the thesis and related coursework.

Thesis:
Each candidate must successfully complete a thesis that involves original research undertaken within a literature context.

Cultural and Environmental Resource Management Program Graduate Information


College of the Sciences
Ellensburg
Fax: 509-963-1047
www.cwu.edu/resource-management
See website for how this program may be used for educational and career purposes

Faculty
Program Coordinators
Natural Resources

Anthony Gabriel, PhD
Department of Geography
Dean Hall, room 320
509-963-1166
gabriela@cwu.edu

Cultural Resources
Patrick Lubinski, PhD
Department of Anthropology
Dean Hall, room 338
509-963-3601
lubinski@cwu.edu

Professors
Kevin Archer, PhD, geography, culture and globalization, social production of nature
Kathleen Barlow, PhD, cultural anthropology, museum studies, culture and politics of natural resource extraction, ethnographic methods
Daniel D. Beck, PhD, biological sciences, ecology, behavior, and physiology of reptiles in the Pacific NW, southwestern USA,and western Mexico
Lisa Ely, PhD, geological sciences, fluvial geomorphology, quaternary geology, paleohydrology
Kristina A. Ernest, PhD, biological sciences, community ecology, plant-herbivore interactions, ecology of small animals
Anthony Gabriel, PhD, geography, resource analysis, physical geography, shoreline inventory and assessment, aquatic systems
Carey Gazis, PhD, geological sciences, geochemistry of fluid-rock interaction in the Earth’s crust
Steven Hackenberger, PhD, anthropology, archaeology, paleoecology, cultural resource management, Columbia Plateau
Daniel Herman, PhD, history, 19th century American West, American Indian history, American cultural history
Robert Hickey, PhD, geography, GIS remote sensing, environment, geology, erosion modeling, Australia
Paul W. James, PhD, biological sciences, fish ecology, stream ecology
Robert Kuhlken, PhD, geography, cultural geography, urban and regional planning, environmental literature
Karl Lillquist, PhD, geography, geomorphology, soils, environmental change in arid lands and mountains, airphoto analysis, field methods
Patrick Lubinski, PhD, anthropology, archaeology, cultural resource management, zooarchaeology
Patrick McCutcheon, PhD, anthropology, archaeology, geoarchaeology, cultural resource management
Lene Pedersen, PhD, cultural anthropology, ecological, political, and visual anthropology, natural resources, local governance, Southeast Asia, Circumpolar North, East Africa
Lori Sheeran, PhD, anthropology, biological anthropology, primate ecology, China
Rex Wirth, PhD, political science, resource policy in developing nations

Associate Professors
Mark Auslander, PhD, anthropology, sociocultural anthropology, museum anthropology, art and aesthetics, meaning in the material world, symbolic mediation, ritual and performance theory, historical anthropology, race and class, engaged anthropology, slavery studies, contemporary African and Diasporic art
John Bowen, PhD, geography, transportation, economic development, quantitative methods, Southeast Asia
Kenneth A. Cohen, PhD, recreation and tourism, sustainable tourism, recourse-based recreation, community development, community capacity building and strategic planning
Tom R. Cottrell, PhD, biological sciences, plant ecology in areas of fire disturbance, rare plant habitats
Jennifer Lipton, PhD, geography, cultural and political ecology, landscape ecology, climate change, geospatial techniques
Joseph Lorenz, PhD, molecular anthropology, primates, human mtDNA and aDNA studies
Craig Revels, PhD, geography, cultural and historical geography, cultural ecology
R. Steven Wagner, PhD, biological sciences, amphibian decline, genetics, herpetology, conservation biology, road ecology, primate behavior
Charles Wassell, PhD, economics, mathematical modeling of economic issues with policy implications

Assistant Professors
Hope Amason, PhD, tourism studies, urban anthropology, political economy, museum anthropology, sociocultural anthropology
Elvin Delgado, PhD, geography, energy and capitalism, political economy and nature, critical resource geography and political ecology
Pamela McMullin-Messier, PhD, demography, collective action, environmental justice, hazards, and gender
Michael Pease, PhD, geography, water resource management, environmental law, resource allocation
Tony Sipic,PhD, economics, environmental economics, political economy, industrial organization
Megan Walsh, PhD, geography, biogeography, paleoecology, climate change, fire history

Faculty from other departments participate in the program as graduate committee members.

Resource Management, MS
Program: The program is interdisciplinary, emphasizing understanding of problems encountered in the management of both natural and cultural resources. It includes a basic core of 27 credits in resource management, courses in areas of interest and a specialty track in either natural resource areas (management of land, water, biotic, atmospheric, and energy resources) or cultural resources management (ethnographic and archaeological sites and materials, historic properties, and archives). An internship is recommended. Students must complete at least 60 credits as outlined in an approved course of study filed with the Office of Graduate Studies and Research. The course of study is selected by advisement before completing 25 credits.
Program Admission Requirements: In addition to general master’s degree regulations for admission to master’s programs, applicants for admission must have the following qualifications:

  1. A solid background in a discipline closely related to the resources they expect to manage. Normally, a bachelor’s degree is required in a technical field such as one of the biological, Earth, or physical sciences, geography, engineering, archaeology, ethnology, history, or architecture. In some cases work experience may be accepted in lieu of a technical major. Before admission, program faculty will evaluate the academic coursework and experience of all applicants for admission, and will recommend remedial course work if, in their judgment, there are deficiencies in pre-baccalaureate work which need to be overcome before entrance into the program.
  2. A high proficiency in written and spoken English as well as potential for post-graduate study and research. Evidence of proficiency and potential may include: GRE scores, samples of previous writing, letters of recommendation, an interview.
  3. A good background in basic statistics (the equivalent of two quarters of undergraduate statistics), knowledge of microeconomic principles, and some knowledge of computer systems (the equivalent of a one-quarter undergraduate course).

Admission to the program and continuation in it may be conditional on the applicant’s satisfactory completion of remedial courses. Such courses will not count toward the program credit requirement but in some cases they may be taken after admission to the program.

Application Deadline and Materials: students must comply with all deadlines and procedures for “applying to CWU” in the graduate admissions section of this catalog.

Additional Information

Graduate Committee: The student will have at least a three-member graduate committee, to be selected in consultation with the program coordinator and the dean of Graduate Studies and Research.

Final Examination: Each candidate must pass a final oral examination on all phases of his or her program including the thesis and related coursework.

Thesis: Each candidate must successfully complete a thesis that involves original research undertaken within a literature context.

College of the Sciences Information


Administration and Organization

Dean
Tim Englund, PhD (Dean Hall, room 130)

Associate Dean
Mike Harrod (Dean Hall, room 130)

Associate Dean
Martha Kurtz, PhD (Dean Hall, room 130)

Staff
Brad Weekly, development officer
Velma Henry, administrative assistant
Cindy Klein, fiscal specialist
Janis Orthmann, administrative assistant
Colleen Falconer, program coordinator
Dannica Price, event coordinator

Mail Stop 7519
509-963-1866
Fax: 509-963-1977
www.cwu.edu/sciences

The College of the Sciences (COTS) is comprised of 13 departments and 12 interdisciplinary programs representing disciplines in the behavioral, natural, and social sciences, and mathematics. The departments and programs of the college offer undergraduate baccalaureate degrees, master’s degrees, minors that supplement other degree programs, and a comprehensive range of service coursework. As an essential part of its mission, the college offers an extensive general education curriculum. The departments play a major role in Central’s Teacher Certification Programs, offering bachelors and master’s degrees for students preparing to be secondary teachers and providing coursework in educational foundations and discipline-specific content and methods.

Departments within the college are committed to teaching excellence, active engagement by faculty in research, scholarship and professional service activities, student involvement in research, community service, and employing practical applications of academic specializations.
 

Departments
All departments offer baccalaureate degree programs and, in some cases, minors, educational specialist degrees and master’s degrees. In addition to consulting department/program headings in this catalog, students are encouraged to contact individual departments and program offices directly.

Anthropology and Museum Studies: Kathleen Barlow, PhD, Dean Hall, room 356, 509-963-3201
Biological Sciences: James Johnson, PhD, Science Building, room 338, 509-963-2731
Chemistry: Levente Fabry-Asztalos, PhD, Science Building, room 302, 509-963-2811
Computer Science: Aaron Montgomery, PhD, Hebeler Hall, room 219, 509-963-1495
Geography: John Bowen, PhD, Dean Hall, room 301, 509-963-1188
Geological Sciences: Carey Gazis, PhD, Lind Hall, room 108B, 509-963-2701
Law and Justice: James Huckabay, PhD, Farrell Hall, room 300, 509-963-3208
Mathematics: Stuart Boersma, PhD, Bouillon Hall, room 108, 509-963-2103
Physics: Bruce Palmquist, PhD, Lind Hall, room 201A, 509-963-2727
Political Science: Todd Schaefer, PhD, Psychology Building, room 415, 509-963-2408
Psychology: Stephanie Stein, PhD, Psychology Building, room 421, 509-963-2381
Science Education: Bruce Palmquist, PhD, Science Building, room 107, 509-963-2929
Sociology: Delores Cleary, PhD, Farrell Hall, room 409, 509-963-1305

Interdisciplinary Programs
These programs offer specialized coursework, interdisciplinary baccalaureate majors or minors, master’s degrees or research, and public service functions.

American Indian Studies: Toni Culjak, PhD, Language and Literature, room 408D, 509-963-1531
Center for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Education: Martha Kurtz, PhD, Dean Hall, room 130, 509-963-2135
Environmental Studies: Carey Gazis, PhD, Lind Hall, room 108B, 509-963-2701
or Pam McMullin-Messier, PhD, Farrell Hall, room 441, 509-963-2222
Ethnic Studies: Nelson Pichardo, PhD, Farrell Hall, room 440, 509-963-1348
Interdisciplinary Studies - Social Sciences: Steve Schepman, PhD, Psychology Building, room 429, 509-963-2389
Museum of Culture and Environment: Mark Auslander, PhD, Dean Hall, room 334, 509-963-3209
Primate Behavior and Ecology Program: Lori Sheeran, PhD, Dean Hall, room 335, 509-963-1434
Resource Management Program: Karl Lillquist, PhD, Dean Hall, room 319, 509-963-1184
or Steve Hackenberger, PhD, Dean Hall, room 349, 509-963-3224
Science Talent Expansion Program (STEP): Lucinda Carnell, PhD, Science, room 338G, 509-963-2821
Women’s and Gender Studies: Judith Hennessey, PhD, Farrell Hall, room 436, 509-963-1574

Affiliated Centers and Institutes
Center for Spatial Information and Research: Anthony Gabriel, PhD, Dean Hall, room 320, 509-963-1166
Center for the Environment: Anne Johnasen, PhD, Science, room 207D, 509-963-2164
Central Washington Archaeological Survey, Anthropology: Patrick McCutcheon, PhD, Dean Hall, room 340, 509-963-2075
or Steve Hackenberger, PhD, Dean Hall, room 349, 509-963-3224
Community Counseling and Psychological Assessment Center: Heath Marrs, PhD, Psychology Building, room 346, 509-963-2349
or Elizabeth Haviland, PhD, Psychology Building, room 118, 509-963-2371
Geodesy Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Geodetic Array (PANGA) Data Analysis Facility: Tim Melbourne, PhD, Hebeler Hall, room 110A, 509-963-2799
Health Career Resources: Keith Monosky, PhD, Dorothy Purser Hall, room 108, 509-963-1145

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