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    Central Washington University
   
 
  Oct 17, 2017
 
 
    
2015-2016 Graduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Master of Music


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The master of music curriculum is designed to provide opportunity for depth of study in an area of specialization, to increase professional competence in teaching and performance, and to prepare for continued, self-directed study or advanced graduate study.

Program: All candidates must complete at least 45 credits as delineated in an approved course of study filed with the Office of Graduate Studies and Research. The major fields are:

  1. Composition
  2. Conducting
  3. Performance
  4. Performance-pedagogy
  5. Music education

At least one-third of the total credit requirements must be in the major field, including six credits of thesis, one-third in other music courses, including three credits of MUS 521 (Methods of Musical Research), three credits of music history, three credits of music theory, and three ensemble credits; and one-third may be elective courses in supportive areas from any discipline. At least 25 credits applied toward the degree must be at the 500 level or above. No more than 20 credits applied toward the degree may be at the 400 (senior undergraduate) level. No 300 level credits may be applied toward the degree. Students are expected to plan their program with a graduate advisor and committee.

Admission Requirements: Admission into the institution does not assure admission into the music program. In addition to general university regulations for admission to the master’s program through the Graduate School, the following requirements apply to the master of music degree:

  1. Candidates must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college with a major in music or its equivalent.
  2. Acceptance into a specific major field will require an evaluation of a candidate’s ability conducted by a committee of three faculty members, two of whom will be from the particular major field. Normally one of these two will serve as the candidate’s graduate advisor, and the committee as a whole may serve as the candidate’s graduate committee.
  3. In addition, non-performance majors must also demonstrate a level of musicianship equal to what would be considered appropriate  for 300-level study. Students may demonstrate this level of musicianship in several ways, appropriate to the desired degree program or deemed appropriate by the evaluating committee after consultation with the student. Examples include, but are not limited to, a performance audition in an applied area or conducting (live or taped), a videotape or audiotape of a performance directed by the applicant, or a videotape of a music lesson or class taught by the applicant.
  4. For admission requirements to each field, see section one in each field entry under specific requirements for major fields.

After meeting minimum criteria for admission into a specific master’s degree for each major, candidates must take diagnostic examinations in music history and music theory at the beginning of their first quarter of graduate study. Deficiencies in any of the above will be delineated to the student by the faculty along with recommendations for remediation. These recommendations may take the form of, but are not limited to, coursework, selected readings, and applied study. Satisfaction of remedial coursework must be passed with a grade equivalent to a B or higher. No master of music degree will be awarded until these appraisals have been passed. The music department recommends that the candidate attempt to satisfy these entrance appraisals at the earliest opportunity.

General Requirements for all graduate music degrees


  • Courses in major field, including MUS 700, Thesis - Credits: (15-21)
  • Other studies in music including below: Credits: (12-15)
  • MUS 521 - Methods of Musical Research Credits: (3)
  • 3 credits of music history
  • 3 credits of music theory (Composition majors may substitute a non-theory course in this category)
  • 3 credits in ensemble courses (course substitution for ensemble requirements for summer MM Education degree program)
  • Elective courses in supportive areas - Credits: (6-15)

Total Credits: 45


Specific Requirements for Major Fields:


A. Composition


1. Admission


Admission to this program will be based upon an evaluation of appropriate compositions submitted by the student.

2. Courses in the major field


A minimum of 9 credits of composition classes, in addition to the 6 credits of thesis study, selected from:

3. Other studies


Other studies in music should include:

  • MUS 521 - Methods of Musical Research Credits: (3)
  • 3 credits of music history courses (selected from Music History Graduate Course listing below)
  • 3 credits in ensemble courses (selected from Ensemble Graduate Course listing below)

4. Thesis


The thesis project (MUS 700) will be an original composition of a level appropriate as a final project and a covering paper. Normally this paper will be based on the thesis composition.

B. Conducting


1. Admission


Admission to this program will require faculty evaluation of evidence of an appropriate level of musicianship, satisfied in one of the following ways:

  • A performance or conducting audition
  • A videotape of a performance directed by the applicant
  • Other evidence deemed appropriate in consultation with the evaluating committee.

This program requires a one-year residency prior to graduation. Candidates will work under the direct supervision of one of the three conductors of the major performance ensembles (Orchestra, Wind Ensemble, and Choir) during each quarter in residence. Students will be encouraged to study in all three areas whenever possible.

2. Courses in the major field


 A minimum of 9 credits of conducting classes, in addition to the 6 credits of thesis study, selected from:

3. Other studies


Other studies in music should include:

  • MUS 521 - Methods of Musical Research Credits: (3)
  • 3 credits in music theory courses (selected from Music Theory Graduate Course listing below)
  • 3 credits of music history courses (selected from Music History Graduate Course listing below)
  • 3 credits in ensemble courses (selected from Ensemble Graduate Course listing below)

4. Thesis


As a thesis project (MUS 700) the student will conduct a public performance and submit a covering paper. Normally this paper will be based on the works conducted.

C. Performance


1. Admission


Admission to this program will be based upon an evaluation of an audition equivalent in scope to at least one-half of a full baccalaureate recital.

It is expected that vocal performance majors must be able to:

  • Demonstrate competency in French, German or Italian equal to the successful completion of one year of university level foreign language. If a candidate is lacking this requirement upon entry, the student must take a year of French or German as a remedial course.
  • Demonstrate the ability to translate musical texts, transcribe French, German, and Italian text into International Phonetic Alphabet with proper pronunciation. If a candidate is lacking in this area, the student will be advised to take all or part of the CWU Diction sequence (MUS 536, MUS 537, MUS 538).

2. Courses in the major field


A minimum of 12 credits of major applied instruction, in addition to the 6 credits of thesis study.

3. Other studies


Other studies in music should include:

  • MUS 521 - Methods of Musical Research Credits: (3)
  • 3 credits in music theory courses (selected from Music Theory Graduate Course listing below)
  • 3 credits of music history courses (selected from Music History Graduate Course listing below)
  • 3 credits in ensemble courses (selected from Ensemble Graduate Course listing below)

4. Thesis


As a thesis project (MUS 700) the student will present a full public recital and submit a covering paper. Normally this paper will be based on the works presented on the recital.

D. Performance-Pedagogy


1. Admission


Admission to this program will be based upon an evaluation of an audition equivalent in scope to at least one-half of a full baccalaureate recital, and evaluation of a paper written for an undergraduate class in the field of music instruction.

It is expected that vocal performance majors must be able to:

  • Demonstrate competency in French, German or Italian equal to the successful completion of one year of university level foreign language. If a candidate is lacking this requirement upon entry, the student must take a year of French or German as a remedial course.
  • Demonstrate the ability to translate musical texts, transcribe French, German, and Italian text into International Phonetic Alphabet with proper pronunciation. If a candidate is lacking in this area, the student will be advised to take all or part of the CWU Diction sequence (MUS 536, MUS 537, MUS 538).

2. Courses in the major field


A minimum of 12 credits of major applied instruction, in addition to the 6 credits of thesis study.

3. Other studies


Other studies in music should include:

  • MUS 521 - Methods of Musical Research Credits: (3)
  • 3 credits in music theory courses (selected from Music Theory Graduate Course listing below)
  • 3 credits of music history courses (selected from Music History Graduate Course listing below)
  • 3 credits in ensemble courses (selected from Ensemble Graduate Course listing below)

4. Thesis


As a thesis project (MUS 700) the student will present either:

  • A demonstration project with covering paper, and one-half of a public recital.
    OR
  • A demonstration project, one-half of a public recital and a covering paper based on the works presented on the recital.
    OR
  • A research paper and one-half of a public recital.

Demonstration projects include lecture-recitals or other public presentations of information.
Research projects are generally self-contained written studies on larger topics.

E. Music Education


1. Admission


Admission to this program will be based upon:

  • Evaluation of an undergraduate paper in the field of music education.
  • The completion of a least one year of successful public school music instruction (under a special request made by the entering student, this requirement may be waived by the music education committee).
  • Evidence of an appropriate level of musicianship, satisfied in one of the following ways:
    1) A performance audition
    2) A videotape or audiotape of a performance directed by the applicant
    3) A videotape of a music lesson or class taught by the applicant
    4) Other evidence deemed appropriate in consultation with the evaluating committee.

2. Courses in the major field


A minimum of 9 credits in courses that enable students to understand and evaluate research in music education, in addition to the 6 credits of thesis study, selected from:

3. Other studies


Other studies in music should include:

  • MUS 521 - Methods of Musical Research Credits: (3)
  • 3 credits in music theory courses (selected from Music Theory Graduate Course listing below)
  • 3 credits of music history courses (selected from Music History Graduate Course listing below)
  • 3 credits in ensemble courses (selected from Ensemble Graduate Course listing below)

4. Thesis


As a thesis project (MUS 700), the student will present either:

  • A research thesis.
    OR
  • A demonstration, analytical or creative project and a covering paper based on the project.

Final Examination


All students must pass a comprehensive final examination, oral, or written and oral, based on their coursework and the thesis. Before the Final Examination can be scheduled, students must have:

  • Satisfied any deficiencies revealed by the diagnostic exams.
  • Completed and submitted the written portion of the thesis/thesis project.

According to University policy, an application for the final examination, approved by the student’s graduate committee, must be filed in the Graduate Office at least three weeks in advance of the examination. This application has several specific parts to it, so early acquisition and completion of this form is strongly recommended. Consult the Graduate Office for any and all appropriate deadline dates.

For more details about Graduate Studies in Music, see the Department of Music’s Handbook for Graduate Studies available 0n-line at the department Website: www.cwu.edu/music.

Graduate Cognate in Music


Similar to an undergraduate minor, a graduate cognate in music lends more coherence to the cluster of elective courses students take beyond those required for the degree and offers more meaningful recognition for this cluster of courses.

Admission


Students who have been accepted into a graduate major in music may apply for admission to a graduate cognate in music after they arrive on campus. Admission to a cognate requires the following, in order:

  • Acceptance for admission to CWU graduate program
  • Acceptance for admission to a major graduate program in music (by audition/interview)
  • Acceptance for admission to the graduate cognate by separate audition/interview. This interview/admission will normally be conducted during the first quarter of enrollment or later. It is not part of the primary admission process so as to avoid confusion of initial advising and enrollment. Acceptance for admission is also dependent on space available in the area, to be determined by faculty in that area.

Guidelines


  • Students are allowed one graduate cognate in music.
  • Students accepted into a cognate will have an assigned advisor, but will not need to form a graduate committee for the cognate final project or recital. This advisor will be responsible for evaluating the culminating recital or project and will also be a member of the student’s graduate committee.
  • Courses counted for the cognate must also be indicated on the course of study form, separate from general, specific and elective curricular requirements.
  • Material and coursework covered in the cognate would be eligible for inclusion in the final examination, as approved by student’s major graduate committee chair.

Content


Students must complete a total of 13 credits to complete a cognate: minimum of 12 credits of courses approved by the cognate advisor in consultation with the major advisor, plus 1 credit of MUS 600, Graduate Cognate Project in the quarter the required culminating work is presented, above the 45 credits required for the master’s degree (totaling a minimum of 58 for the degree with major and cognate).

Subject Areas


Composition
Conducting
Jazz Pedagogy
Music Education
Music History
Music Theory
Performance
Performance-Pedagogy

Individual Subject Area Requirements:


Composition


Students receive guided study in their own musical composition, culminating in the presentation of a musical composition or project in the field of composition.

Conducting


Students are provided opportunities to hone their conducting skills, culminating in a project or public performance demonstrating progress in the student’s conducting experience.

Jazz Pedagogy


 Students are provided opportunities to study jazz pedagogy through the combined elements of informed jazz performance practice and demonstrated teaching/coaching of students, culminating in an appropriate pedagogical project or written document.

Music Education


Students are provided opportunities to study and conduct research in the field of music education in greater depth, culminating in an appropriate written document or project.

Music History


Students are provided opportunities to study and conduct research in the field of music history in greater depth, culminating in an appropriate written document or project.

Music Theory


Students are provided opportunities to study and conduct research in the field of music theory in greater depth, culminating in an appropriate written document or project.

  • MUS 600 - Graduate Cognate Project Credits: (1)
  • 12 credits of approved Music Theory classes (Note: These credits are in addition to 3 credits of Music Theory required in all master’s degrees.) See Music Theory Graduate course listing below for options.

Performance


Students receive opportunities through applied study and performance experience to improve their performance skills on a primary instrument or voice, culminating in a public performance.

Performance-Pedagogy


Students receive opportunities to improve performance skills with additional emphasis on the pedagogy of the primary instrument or voice, culminating in an appropriate performance, project, or combination in lecture/demonstration.

Listing of Graduate Courses in Music History, Music Theory, and Ensembles


Music Department Graduate Information


College of Arts and Humanities
Ellensburg
Jerilyn S. McIntyre Music Building
Mail Stop 7458
509-963-1216
Fax: 509-963-1239
www.cwu.edu/music
See website for how these programs may be used for educational and career purposes.

Faculty and Staff
Chair
Todd Shiver, DMA

Associate Chair
Jeff Snedeker, DMA

Professors
Joseph Brooks, MM, clarinet, saxophone, woodwind methods
Chris Bruya, MM, jazz studies
Lewis Norfleet, MM, bands, music education, conducting
Mark Goodenberger, MM, percussion
John Harbaugh, MME, trumpet, jazz studies
Carrie Rehkopf-Michel, MM, violin, chamber music, Kairos String Quartet
John Michel, MM, cello, chamber music, pedagogy, Kairos String Quartet
Hal Ott, DM, flute, literature
John F. Pickett, DM, piano, literature, pedagogy
Vijay Singh, MAT, jazz studies, choir, voice

Associate Professors
Gayla Blaisdell, PhD, voice, opera
Nikolas Caoile, DMA, orchestra, conducting
Mark Lane, MM, music education, band
Daniel Lipori, DMA, music history, bassoon, double reed methods
Bret Smith, PhD, music education, string pedagogy
Gary Weidenaar, DMA, choir, conducting, music education

Assistant Professors
Martin Kennedy, DMA, theory, composition
John Neurohr, DMA, trombone, brass pedagogy, brass literature
Melissa Schiel, DMA, voice, pedagogy

Lecturers
Tim Betts, MM, viola, music appreciation, Kairos String Quartet
Tor Blaisdell, MM, voice
Denise Dillenbeck, MM, Kairos String Quartet
Laura Goben, BM oboe
Anna Jensen, MM, string bass
Teresa Harbaugh, MM, class piano
Kirsten Neurohr, DMA, theory, music appreciation
David McLemore, MM, tuba, euphonium, history of jazz
Scott Peterson, DMA, men’s choir
Barbara Pickett, MM, piano, class piano
Maria Roditeleva-Wibe, PhD, music history, theory, world music
Leslie Schneider, MM, music education
Emelie Spencer, MM, voice, theory
Norm Wallen, MM, theory
Adam Pelandini, MM, saxophone

Staff
Marcie Brown, program assistant
Sara Caroll, advisor/recruiter
Star Heger, fiscal specialist
Allen Larsen, hall manager, audio technician, web manager
Teresa Larsen, secretary supervisor
Harry Whitaker, piano technician 

Department Fees
All fees are billed to students’ accounts.

  •   $15 fee for each MUS 154 (Class Instruction) course (all sections except B and H).
  •   $85 fee for 1 credit and $170 fee for 2 credits each quarter of enrollment in MUS 164, 264, or 364 (Individual applied instruction).
  •   $170 fee each quarter of enrollment in MUS 464 (Individual applied instruction).
  •   $85 fee for 2 credits and $170 fee for 4 credits each quarter of enrollment in MUS 564 and 664 (Individual applied instruction).
  •   $85 fee each quarter of enrollment in X71 (Secondary applied instruction).
  •   $40 fee each quarter for students enrolled in Vocal Jazz I
  •   $40 fee for each scheduled student recital
  •   $15 fee for each MUS 252, 253, and 254 (Class Instrumental Methods) course
  •   $5 annual locker fee (Optional if you choose to get a locker)
  •   $5 fee for students enrolled in Percussion Ensemble
  •   $25 university tech fee covers use of electronic equipment used in all music courses. Part-time students enrolled in theory, class piano, composition, or electronic music courses will be assessed this fee.

College of Arts and Humanities Information


Administration and Organization

Dean
Stacey Robertson, PhD (Hebeler Hall, room 202)

Interim Associate Dean
Katharine Whitcomb, PhD (Hebeler Hall, room 202)

Mail Stop 7518
509-963-1858
Fax: 509-963-1851
www.cwu.edu/arts/

Overview
The College of Arts and Humanities (CAH) is comprised of 12 departments and programs, which represent the disciplines of the arts and humanities. All of the departments and some of the programs of CAH offer undergraduate degrees as well as minors which supplement other degree programs. Five departments offer Master’s degrees. In addition to its role in providing degree programs, CAH is responsible for many of the course offerings of the general education programs as well as extensive service coursework for the entire university. The college also plays a major role in Central’s teacher education programs, offering bachelors and master’s degrees for students preparing to be secondary teachers and providing coursework in educational foundations and discipline-specific methods for teacher education majors. Building on a legacy of teaching excellence, college faculty are engaged in research, creative activities and service, involving students in the scholarship and practical applications of their various academic specializations, while making important contributions to the intellectual tradition and to society at large. There are no special requirements for admission to the college, but some departments have requirements that are described under the respective department and program headings in the catalog.

Mission
The College of Arts and Humanities advances knowledge, promotes intellectual inquiry, and cultivates creative endeavor among students and faculty through teaching informed by scholarship, creative activity, and public and professional involvement. We are committed to helping students develop intellectual and practical skills for responsible citizenship and the challenges of contemporary life in a global society. The college offers disciplinary and interdisciplinary programs of the highest quality, acts as a steward of the foundational disciplines upon which all inquiry is based, and serves as a cultural center for arts and humanities for the university and the region.

Vision
The College of Arts and Humanities will be recognized as a distinguished learning community known regionally for scholarly and creative excellence, innovative, and rigorous foundational liberal arts education, and undergraduate and graduate programs that are outstanding and unique in the state.

Departments and Programs
Africana and Black Studies Program: Bobby Cummings, PhD (Michaelsen Hall, room 104)
Art: Gregg Schlanger, MFA (Randall Hall, room 100)
Asia/Pacific Studies Program: Jeffrey Dippman, PhD (Language and Literature Bldg., room 337C)
Communication: Marji Morgan, PhD (Bouillon Hall, room 232A)
English: George Drake, PhD (Language and Literature Bldg., room 423)
Film and Video Studies Program: Liahna Armstrong, PhD  and Jon Ward (Bouillon Hall, room 225)
History: Jason Knirck, PhD (Language and Literature Bldg., room 100)
Latino and Latin American Studies Program: Stella Moreno, PhD (Language and Literature Bldg., room 102J)
Music: Todd Shiver, DMA (Jerilyn S. McIntyre Music Building, room 144)
Philosophy and Religious Studies: Matthew Altman, PhD (Language and Literature Bldg., room 337)
Theatre Arts: Scott Robinson, MFA (McConnell Hall, room 106)
World Languages: Laila Abdalla, PhD (Language and Literature Bldg., room 102)

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