Oct 16, 2019  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 Courses numbered from 101–299 are lower-division courses, primarily for freshmen and sophomores; those numbered from 300–499 are upper-division courses, primarily for juniors and seniors. The numbers 296, 396, 496, and 596 designate individual study courses and are available for registration by prior arrangement with the course instructor and approval of the department chair.

The number in parentheses following the course title indicates the amount of credit each course carries. Variable credit courses include the minimum and maximum number of the credits within parentheses.

Not all of the courses are offered every quarter. Final confirmation of courses to be offered, information on new courses and programs, as well as a list of hours, instructor, titles of courses and places of class meetings, is available online in My CWU which can be accessed through the the CWU home page, and go to www.cwu.edu/registrar/course-information

 

Film (FILM)

  
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    FILM 467 - Narrative Screenwriting III


    Description:
    Combined lecture/workshop providing in-depth study of the theory and practice of adaptations and alternative plots for screenplays and teleplays. Formerly COM 457, students may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: FILM 457 and admission to the English professional and creative writing or film majors.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the effect of the manipulation of scene construction, cinematography and editing on the creation of narrative in screenplays and teleplays.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the effect of the manipulation of visual and aural continuity and discontinuity, temporal and spatial, on the creation of narrative in screenplays and teleplays.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the effect of the manipulation of semiotics (language, symbols, archetypes, mythic themes) on the creation of narrative in screenplays and teleplays.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the relationship between cognition and the creation and understanding of narratives.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the relationship between oral tradition and communication, and the creation of narrative and dialog in screenplays and teleplays.
    • Identify/explain and demonstrate the development of theme, point-of-view, authorial voice, characters and setting on the creation of narrative in screenplays and teleplays.​
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18
  
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    FILM 470 - The Writer’s Room


    Description:
    This repeatable workshop course helps students develop the skills, techniques, and work ethic of a professional screenwriter. Students will pitch ideas, create outlines, write and rewrite short screenplays, and critique the work of others. May be repeated up to 15 credits. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FILM 267 or ENG 267.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Develop and prepare potential story ideas.
    • Outline and prepare story ideas into beat-sheets and treatments according to industry standards.
    • Construct and present story pitches based on developed ideas.
    • Compose a film script that adheres to industry standards.
    • Assess and evaluate submitted scripts for story execution, character presentation, and thematic elements.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    6/01/17
  
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    FILM 480 - Production VI


    Description:
    Through the creative participation in one substantial film project this capstone course offers students the opportunity to demonstrate command of all the fundamental principles learned during their time in the Film Program. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: FILM 440 and FILM 450.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Prepare and organize a script for production.
    • Manage and arrange all aspects of pre-production.
    • Plan and construct a film that demonstrates a professional level understanding of the filmmaking process.
    • Justify various creative choices during production and post-production.
    • Evaluate completed films and offer a critical analysis.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    6/01/17
  
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    FILM 489 - Film Career Seminar


    Description:
    Students prepare end-of-major portfolios, demonstrating achievement of film program outcomes and skills appropriate to their specialization. Grade will either be S or U. Permission by instructor. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: film major status and instructor permission.

    Credits: (1)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Design a career strategy.
    • Select and compile a portfolio of work.
    • Assess performance and experience in film program.
    • Analyze and reflect strengths and weaknesses of film program.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    5/04/17
  
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    FILM 490 - Cooperative Education


    Description:
    Practical experience in film-related careers. Individual contract field experience with business, industry, government, or non-profit organization. Requires a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervision, and faculty coordination. May be repeated for a total of 12 credits. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: Film major status and permission of program director.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
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    FILM 491 - Workshop


    Credits: (1-6)

  
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    FILM 492 - Practicum


    Description:
    Focused, practical application of classroom skills-sets to the production of film projects under faculty direction and/or supervision, and/or practice planning instruction, teaching and assessing learning in film-related course(s). May be repeated up to 6 credits. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: film major status and permission of program director.

    Credits: (2)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Propose a film or script project.
    • Manage and lead a film production or develop a script, demonstrating professional practices that meet industry expectations. 
    • Students will appraise their own performance regarding personal motivation, reliability, and good judgment, as well as professional attitude and good communication skills
    • Student will present and receive criticism for a completed film production that meets deliverable requirements and receive criticism.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    6/01/17
  
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    FILM 496 - Individual Study


    Credits: (1-6)

  
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    FILM 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
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    FILM 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

  
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    FILM 499 - Seminar


    Credits: (1-6)


Finance (FIN)

  
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    FIN 101 - Financial Literacy


    Description:
    An introduction to financial concepts relevant to everyday savers.  Topics include stocks, bonds, indexes, mutual funds, the power of compounding, investing in stocks, valuation of stocks, behavioral finance, the effects of the macroeconomy on investments, and stock market valuation. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe how developments in finance have made markets more efficient and improved the functioning of the economy and returns for investors over time. (ST-1)
    • Recognize the ethical, economic, and social implications, and resultant political implications, of developments in finance. (ST-2)
    • Formulate questions relating to long term company value that can be assessed using financial analysis techniques. (ST-3)
    • Apply mathematical and quantitative reasoning to forecast future prospects of a company and assess overall investment worthiness. (ST-4) 
    • Demonstrate a basic understanding of fundamental concepts within finance.  (WK-1)
    • Demonstrate knowledge of scholarly and creative methods used within finance.  (WK-2)
    • Demonstrate an understanding of conceptual financial models reflecting complex challenges and real-world issues.  (PCI-5)
    • Determine credibility of financial information sources and understand elements that might temper this credibility.  (PCI-6)
    • Develop approaches to address individual and/or societal financial health and financial well-being issues.  (HWB-4)
    • Appraise key financial factors and strategies that propagate an individual’s personal, social, and professional future well-being.  (HWB-6)
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18
  
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    FIN 174 - Personal Finance


    Description:
    This course addresses the broad spectrum of financial issues encountered by individuals throughout their lives. Topics include but are not limited to: Preparing a personal budget, money management, investments, retirement planning, educational planning and insurance. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer). Basic Skills 4 - Math.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: either at least 500 on the SAT, 19 on the ACT, a Compass test score of either 50-Pre-Algebra, a 26-Algebra, 31-College Algebra, or 31-Trigonometry, or an Accuplacer score in Elementary Algebra of 60+ or Arithmetic of 100+, or completed MATH 100B or a higher level math class.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize the importance of analyzing everyday purchases and determine whether “on sale” goods or services are truly the best buy based on a comparison of the per unit cost or percent savings of similar goods and services.
    • Explain how to analyze, interpret and make decisions based on interest rate calculations, cost of credit calculations, investment fund options, insurance variables, budget analysis, savings, debt and financial goals.
    • Calculate percentages, fractions and ratios to analyze relationship between one’s income, expenses, assets, and liabilities.
    • Assemble basic statistical summaries, including mean, median, mode and range when analyzing various personal finance situations.
    • Explain the hidden costs of credit by interpreting the fine print on purchase agreements, or in credit card offers.
    • Evaluate investments options such making monthly investments versus one time investments, differing rates of return and time horizon affect the outcome of saving.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/16/2017
  
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    FIN 298 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

  
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    FIN 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

  
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    FIN 370 - Introductory Financial Management


    Description:
    An introduction to financial decision making. Topics include financial statement analysis, time value of money, risk and return, securities valuation, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and capital structure. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (ACCT 251 and BUS 221 and ECON 201 and admission to a College of Business Major; or admission to a College of Business Graduate Program); or (ACCT 301 and BUS 221 and ECON 201 and admission to the Bachelor of Science, Personal Financial Planning major); or (admission to an Actuarial Science major who has completed ACCT 251 or ACCT 301 and ECON 201 and MATH 172 and MATH 173 and BUS 221 or MATH 311 with grades no lower than a C (2.0). MATH 311 may be taken concurrently.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge in prerequisite areas of accounting, economics, math, and statistics and apply these principles to problems and decisions in financial management.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of principles, theory, and practices of financial management–domestically and globally–to include the following topics:  time value of money, financial statement analysis, risk and return, securities valuation, capital budgeting, cost of capital, and capital structure.
    • Demonstrate awareness of ethics and diversity as they relate to financial management.
    • Demonstrate written communication skills.
    • Demonstrate ability to solve problems in financial management, using internet resources, financial calculators, and computer spreadsheets.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/5/18
  
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    FIN 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

  
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    FIN 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
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    FIN 398 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

  
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    FIN 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

  
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    FIN 466 - Working Capital Management


    Description:
    Course covers the management of current assets and current liabilities, describes the nature and types of short-term credit instruments, and incorporates a significant use of Excel.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: a grade of C or higher in FIN 370 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Understand a firm’s short-term financing alternatives and the various strategies it can use to fund its current and long-term assets.
    • Calculate various liquidity and solvency measures. They will be able to illustrate situations where a “profitable” firm can go bankrupt.
    • Understand the various inventory models that deal with the timing and amount of raw material inventory purchases. They will be able to calculate the “optimal” inventory and order quantity. They will also be aware of various accounting systems used to monitor inventory balances.
    • Evaluate a credit request and understand how various accounting systems and measurement techniques are used to monitor receivables balances. Students will also know how delinquent accounts should be handled and what alternatives a firm possesses to pursue past due accounts.
    • Understand how firms can make the decision to take a cash discount and will be able to calculate the optimal payment timing. Students will also understand how controlled disbursement and zero balance accounts can be used to lengthen the firm’s disbursement float.
    • Explain the positive and negative impacts of bank deregulation on the management of all the current accounts.
    • Calculate short-term, intermediate-term and long-term forecasts. Additionally, they will be able to determine financing needs based on their forecasts.
    • Evaluate the effectiveness of a lockbox and concentration banking system in reducing a firm’s collection float. Students will also understand the various financial models used to make the cash and securities allocation decision. Students will also be aware of the characteristics of the major short-term marketable securities.
    • Perform all calculations using spreadsheet cell formulas and built in functions. Students will also be able to create various types of graphs.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    02/05/2015
  
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    FIN 470 - Intermediate Financial Management


    Description:
    A review, consolidation, and extension of the FIN 370 class. Additional focus on the theory, practice, and analysis of the firm’s investing and financing activities as these activities relate to the value creation process. Course will be offered every year (Fall and Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (a grade of C or higher in FIN 370 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25) Or (FIN 370 with a minimum grade of C AND declaration  of a Finance Minor) OR (FIN 370 with a minimum grade of C AND admission to an Actuarial Science major).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the importance of financial planning and capital utilization.
    • Discuss the inter-relationships between operating cash flow, financial planning and growth
    • Apply break even and/or what if analysis to consider capital budgeting problems.
    • Calculate the cost of capital for a company
    • Outline the processes companies can use to raise capital.
    • Discuss the relationship between risk and return
    • Summarize the basics of bankruptcy
    • Explain the role of dividends in corporate valuation
    • Prepare a cash budget and short term financial plan
    • Summarize the potential impact of foreign exchange rates on corporate investments
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/6/2017
  
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    FIN 474 - Personal Financial Planning


    Description:
    Introduction to full range of financial planning decisions, including: budgeting, investing, tax planning, risk management, employee benefits, retirement, and estate planning.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in FIN 370 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of all aspects of personal financial planning, including budgeting, credit management, investing and investment markets, tax planning, risk management, retirement planning and estate planning.
    • Demonstrate written communication skills.
    • Demonstrate awareness of ethics as it relates to financial planning and investments.
    • Demonstrate the ability to solve problems in financial planning using financial calculators and spreadsheets.
    • Demonstrate awareness of ethics as it relates to investment management and professional codes of conduct in the investment industry.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    02/05/2015
  
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    FIN 475 - Investments


    Description:
    Principles of investment valuation. Topics include a survey of securities and securities markets, analysis of risk, expected return, timing, and selection of stocks and bonds in a portfolio context. Course will be offered on odd numbered years (Fall and Winter).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (a grade of C or higher in FIN 370 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25) OR FIN 370 and admission to the Bachelor of Science in Personal Financial Planning major AND completion of BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25) OR (FIN 370 with a minimum grade of C AND declaration  of a Finance Minor) OR (FIN 370 with a minimum grade of C AND admission to an Actuarial Science major).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the basic structure and function of financial markets
    • Design an investment portfolio that meets a defined objective regarding risk and return
    • Prepare a security analysis of a company
    • Compare the Efficient Market Hypothesis to behavioral financial theories.
    • Evaluate a financial statement to make an investment determination
    • Discuss the role of mutual funds as a means of investment
    • Summarize basic investment principles
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/6/2017
  
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    FIN 477 - International Finance


    Description:
    Financial decision making in an international setting. Explores both traditional areas of finance and recent innovations in financial management from the perspective of the multinational corporation.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in FIN 370 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge in the principles and practices of financial management to international financial management.
    • Communicate effectively in written financial reports.
    • Demonstrate awareness of ethics and diversity as they relate to financial management in a global setting.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    02/05/2015
  
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    FIN 478 - Management of Financial Institutions (Put on Reserve 9/16/16.)


    Description:
    Asset-liability management process; investment and financing activities of banks, savings and loans, and credit unions. (Put on Reserve 9/16/16. Last taught in 2011. Will go inactive 8/24/19.)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in FIN 370 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon sucessful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the operations of depository financial institutions (banks, savings and loans, and credit unions) and their investment and funding practices.
    • Apply strong analytical skills to solve financial problems.
    • Effectively produce a technical report.
    • Demonstrate awareness of ethical and legal issues related to the management of a financial institution.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    02/05/2015
  
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    FIN 479 - Derivative Securities and Risk Management (Put on Reserve 9/16/16.)


    Description:
    Survey of characteristics, markets, and pricing of options, futures, and other derivative securities and their use in managing risk for large and small businesses and investors, domestically and internationally. (Put on Reserve 9/16/16. Last taught in 2011. Will go inactive 8/24/19.)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: a grade of C or higher in FIN 370 and admission to a College of Business major AND completion of the College of Business Foundation courses (ACCT 251 and ACCT 252 and BUS 221 and BUS 241 and MATH 153 or MATH 154 or MATH 170 or MATH 172 or MATH 173 and ECON 201) with a minimum C- grade in each course and a minimum collegiate GPA of 2.25.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon sucessful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain the basic processes of hedging and speculation as risk transfer and how options and futures facilitate these processes.
    • Analyze the potential results of basic and advanced option combination strategies using the profit diagram framework.
    • Describe the basic factors that determine values of put and call options, and demonstrate familiarity with two fundamental valuation frameworks-the binomial and Black-Scholes.
    • Describe the basic institutional characteristics of options forward and futures contracts and markets (both exchange-based and over-the-counter) in the U.S. and abroad.
    • Describe the relation between forward (or futures) prices and spot prices, and the reasons why forward prices may differ from futures prices.
    • Demonstrate examples of various hedging and speculative strategies using equity, index and currency features.
    • Demonstrate competence in obtaining and evaluating information from internet web sites that provide information about options, forward, and futures markets.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    02/05/2015
  
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    FIN 493 - Finance Boot Camp


    Description:
    Supervised field experience seminar focused on finance related organizations and processes. On-location industry engagement. Education, training, and business skills application in industry setting. Grade will either be S or U. Permission of instructor. May be repeated up to 6 credits. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (1-6)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Prepare a research brief on each organization participating in the boot camp
    • Exhibit professional behavior and appropriate business skills in industry setting.
    • Establish a professional network within the industry professionals
    • Illustrate an awareness of the organization(s) participating in the boot camp.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/1/18
  
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    FIN 496 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

  
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    FIN 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
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    FIN 498 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

  
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    FIN 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)


French (FR)

  
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    FR 151 - First-year French


    Description:
    Conversational approach with intensive oral-aural drill. Firm foundation in the basic structural principles of the language. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Credits: (5)

  
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    FR 152 - First-year French


    Description:
    Conversational approach with intensive oral-aural drill. Firm foundation in the basic structural principles of the language. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 151.

    Credits: (5)

  
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    FR 153 - First-year French


    Description:
    Conversational approach with intensive oral-aural drill. Firm foundation in the basic structural principles of the language. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 152.

    Credits: (5)

  
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    FR 181 - Rapid Review of First Year French (Put on reserve 9/16/17)


    Description:
    Intense review of first-year French for people with the equivalent for two years of school French who wish to hone their listening, speaking, reading, writing, and cultural skills and possibly continue with second-year French. (Put on reserve 9/16/17. Will go inactive 8/24/2020.)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: two years of high school French or equivalent.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe everyday topics in the present, past, future indicative in both oral and written contexts
    • Employ elementary vocabulary and grammar appropriately in both oral and written contexts
    • Distinguish appropriate use of indicative versus subjunctive moods in both present and past
    • Examine cultural practices of Spain and Latin America
    • Recognize appropriate use of vocabulary and grammar in both written and oral input
    • Recognize and produce standard French pronunciation
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/18/2013
  
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    FR 200 - Introduction to French Culture


    Description:
    This course examines major historical events, social movements, and debates that situate contemporary French culture in historical perspective through a variety of cultural artifacts. Taught in English. Course will be offered every year. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe how historical and socio-cultural developments in France such as the Revolution and colonial occupation have affected minority and majority communities and informed competing notions of citizenship and evolving political structures and practices.
    • Describe and evaluate sociocultural diversity in contemporary French culture and explain how culturally diverse experiences create value within French society; use critical thinking to explain why certain quarters of the society fail to value France’s religious and cultural diversity.
    • Apply critical thinking in order to analyze the ways in which equality and inequality are institutionalized in France’s socio-political, economic, and/or organizational structures.
    • Identify and describe a number of French social movements and explain the importance of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, and class in relation to these social movements (how they inform both social justice movements and their ethnic nationalist counterparts).
    • Describe and analyze local-to-global dynamics as they shape contemporary French culture within the broader context of interdependent global systems today.
    • Compare and critically assess relationships between French models of citizenship to American models (compare and contrast what an informed citizen looks like in each model); and then explain in turn how these models are informed by historical, economic, cultural, economic, and political forces and processes.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/18/18
  
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    FR 201 - Appreciation of French Cuisine


    Description:
    Appreciation of French cuisine through the aesthetic theories of French gastronomy, in-class tastings, and consideration of French culture, history, and dietary habits. Taught in English. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe and evaluate the qualities of French cuisine accurately using the appropriate aesthetic and cultural terminology
    • Identify techniques used in French cuisine and explain the value of these techniques in achieving an aesthetically elevated product
    • Relate French cuisine to French culture and history and to evolving French aesthetic norms and traditions from the 19th century to the present
    • Distinguish and explain the differences among divergent views and approaches to French cuisine in terms of regional, social class, and religious (among other) differences
    • Apply aesthetic judgement and critical thinking by tasting and using appropriate vocabulary to evaluate/describe flavor profiles, textures, cooking techniques, etc.
    • Identify and critically assess connections between dietary habits, cultural norms governing food and drink, and individual and societal health
    • Identify and evaluate ways in which the relationship between personal, social, professional, and economic well-being is tied to (and expressed by) dietary habits and cultural norms governing food and drink
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/18/18
  
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    FR 251 - Second-year French


    Description:
    Thorough review of French grammar and graduated readings in modern French prose with discussions conducted in French. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Credits: (5)

  
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    FR 252 - Second-year French


    Description:
    Thorough review of French grammar and graduated readings in modern French prose with discussions conducted in French. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 251.

    Credits: (5)

  
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    FR 253 - Second-year French


    Description:
    Thorough review of French grammar and graduated readings in modern French prose with discussions conducted in French. Courses must be taken in sequence.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 252.

    Credits: (5)

  
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    FR 298 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    FR 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

  
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    FR 301 - Introduction to French Literature


    Description:
    This course is designed as a transition course to prepare students for the advanced literature courses. Appreciation of literature and methods of analysis will be taught on a basic level through the careful examination of specific texts.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (3)

  
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    FR 351 - French Civilization I: Pre-history to the Revolution


    Description:
    An overview of continental French history and culture from pre-history to the 1789.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe major historical developments in continental France from the pre- historical era to the French Revolution.
    • Identify major movements and important people in the literature, plastic arts, and music of the pre-Revolutionary period in France.
    • Identify some salient aspects of the historical development of the French language from the pre-Roman era to the Eighteenth century.
    • Read a French history text book and literary works from the period written in French and summarize these works in appropriate written French.
    • Identify the main points and/or summarize the basic argument of authentic video recordings in French in appropriate written French.
    • Use spoken French to describe and evaluate a limited selection of cultural artifacts within their historical context in an organized and comprehensible manner to their peers.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/17/2014
  
  •  

    FR 352 - French Civilization II: Revolution to 1968.


    Description:
    An overview of continental French history and culture from the French Revolution to cultural revolution of 1968.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe major historical developments in continental France from the Revolution to 1968.
    • Identify major movements and important people in the literature, plastic arts, and music of France during the period between 1789 and 1968.
    • Identify some salient aspects of the historical development of the French language during the period between 1789 and 1968.
    • Read a French history text book and literary works from the period written in French and summarize these works in appropriate written French.
    • Identify the main points and/or summarize the basic argument of authentic video recordings in French in appropriate written French.
    • Use spoken French to describe and evaluate a limited selection of cultural artifacts within their historical context in an organized and comprehensible manner to their peers.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/17/2014
  
  •  

    FR 353 - French Civilization III: Contemporary France


    Description:
    An overview of contemporary French culture through readings and viewings of French media with emphasis on topics such as immigration, religion, globalization, and politics of the family.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Outline the basic lineaments of social issues unique to contemporary French society such as immigration, religion, globalization, and politics of the family.
    • Identify and characterize major French media (including newspapers, television shows, social media outlets, and magazines) in regards to their treatment of contemporary social issues.
    • Acquire a basic level of socio-linguistic awareness concerning the French spoken by minority and youth communities in France today.
    • Read French newspapers and other contemporary print and online media written in French and summarize these works in appropriate written French.
    • Identify the main points and/or summarize the basic argument of authentic video recordings in French in appropriate written French.
    • Use spoken French to describe and evaluate a limited selection of cultural artifacts within their historical context in an organized and comprehensible manner to their peers.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/17/2014
  
  •  

    FR 361 - Cultures of the French Caribbean


    Description:
    A survey of the history and cultures of the French Caribbean from the colonial era to the present.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the broad historical development of French Caribbean culture from the colonial era to the present.
    • Identify major movements and important people in the literature, plastic arts, and music of French Caribbean culture.
    • Identify linguistic and dialectal particularities of French Caribbean culture in broad terms.
    • Read French historical and anthropological treatments of the French Caribbean, and literary works from the region written in French, and summarize these works in appropriate written French.
    • Identify the main points and/or summarize the basic argument of authentic video recordings in French in appropriate written French.
    • Use spoken French to describe and evaluate a limited selection of cultural artifacts from the French Caribbean within their historical and cultural context in an organized and comprehensible manner to their peers.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/17/2014
  
  •  

    FR 362 - Cultures in French Canada (Put on reserve 9/16/18)


    Description:
    A survey of the history and cultures of francophone Canada from the colonial era to the present. (Put on reserve 9/16/18, will go inactive 8/24/21)

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the broad historical development of French Canadian culture from the colonial era to the present.
    • Identify major movements and important people in the literature, plastic arts, and music of French Canadian culture.
    • Identify linguistic and dialectal particularities of French Canadian culture in broad terms.
    • Read French historical and anthropological treatments of French Canada and literary works from the region written in French, and summarize these works in appropriate written French.
    • Identify the main points and/or summarize the basic argument of authentic video recordings in French in appropriate written French.
    • Use spoken French to describe and evaluate a limited selection of cultural artifacts from francophone Canada within their historical and cultural context in an organized and comprehensible manner to their peers.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/17/2014
  
  •  

    FR 363 - Cultures of Francophone Africa


    Description:
    A survey of the history and cultures of francophone Africa, including the Maghreb and Sub-Saharan Africa, from the colonial era to the present.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe the broad historical development of francophone African cultures from the colonial era to the present.
    • Identify major movements and important people in the literature, plastic arts, and music of francophone African cultures.
    • Identify linguistic and dialectal particularities of francophone African cultures in broad terms.
    • Read French historical and anthropological treatments of francophone Africa, and literary works from the region written in French, and summarize these works in appropriate written French.
    • Identify the main points and/or summarize the basic argument of authentic video recordings in French in appropriate written French.
    • Use spoken French to describe and evaluate a limited selection of cultural artifacts from francophone Africa within their historical and cultural context in an organized and comprehensible manner to their peers.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/17/2014
  
  •  

    FR 380 - Topics in French Language, Literature and Culture


    Description:
    This course will offer different topics on a rotating basis: these topics will include French language (grammar and conversation), French and Francophone literature and cinema, and French and Francophone cultures. May be repeated up to 12 credits.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: FR 253 or by permission of instructor.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and correctly utilize advanced grammatical and morphological concepts in French
    • Express ideas on specific concepts orally and in well-organized compositions in French
    • Identify literary and cinematographic phenomena and terminology within the context of French and Francophone history and culture
    • Analyze French and Francophone literary texts and movies
    • Identify cultural traits specific to French and Francophone cultures and analyze them within an historical context
    • Analyze French and Francophone cultures and compare them to other cultures
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/1/2012
  
  •  

    FR 384 - Defying Nazism: German and French Resistance during WWII


    Description:
    Course focuses on the Resistance movements in Germany and France as people from both countries struggled to come to terms with Hitler and Nazism. FR 384 and GERM 384 are cross-listed courses; a student may not receive credit for both. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and describe the ways in which beliefs and values affect interpretations of experiences and events.
    • Interpret the events experienced in France and Germany from WWI to WWII and compare them to similarly significant historical events.
    • Identify the causes of the German and French Resistance movements. 
    • Examine and explain the effects of the German and French Resistance movements on the government and citizens of each country.
    • Recognize the interrelatedness of human concerns that transcend geographical and cultural boundaries.
    • Identify and interpret the significance of salient cultural and historical details of resistance movements.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    Approved Fall 2017
  
  •  

    FR 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    FR 397 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    FR 398 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    FR 399 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

  
  •  

    FR 460 - French Cinema (Put on reserve 9/16/18)


    Description:
    Students will view and analyze French films as a backdrop to the discussion of the history of French cinema. (Put on reserve 9/16/18, will go inactive 8/24/21)

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the major genre of French cinema and apply their individual characteristics to specific films shown in class.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    10/21/2004
  
  •  

    FR 491 - Workshop


    Description:
    May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-6)

  
  
  •  

    FR 497 - Honors


    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: admission to department honors program.

    Credits: (1-12)

  
  •  

    FR 498 - Special Topics


    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    FR 499 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)


Geography (GEOG)

  
  •  

    GEOG 101 - World Regional Geography


    Description:
    An introduction to the dynamic landscapes of the world’s major regions, examining socioeconomic, political, demographic, cultural and environmental patterns, processes, and issues. SB-Perspectives on World Cultures. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize the key factors shaping contemporary demographic, environmental, social, cultural, political, and economic issues in major world regions.
    • Apply course concepts and disciplinary language to interpret how ethnic diversity, social inequality, and similar dimensions of difference are manifest in economic and political systems in major world regions.
    • Propose ways in which the student can participate meaningfully and ethically in the economy, politics, and the environment at the global scale.
    • Use the concepts of geography generally and ideas taught in world regional geography in particular to analyze development problems.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/2/17
  
  •  

    GEOG 107 - Our Dynamic Earth


    Description:
    The complex weather, climate, water, landforms, soils, and vegetation comprising Earth’s physical environments over space and time. Incorporates map interpretation and scientific analysis in understanding various landscapes and human impacts upon those landscapes. NS-Patterns and Connections Natural World. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Describe how geographic research provides greater understanding of Earth’s physical environment and its implications for human sustainability and decision-making at various scales. 
    • Describe how physical geographers use the scientific method to generate testable hypotheses about real-world physical phenomena using such tools as maps, remotely-sensed images, and field observations. 
    • Gather and statistically analyze quantitative data regarding the spatial and temporal variability of the Earth’s physical systems and environments, and evaluate the validity those findings.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the fundamental processes and components of each of the five spheres of the physical environment (i.e., atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, lithosphere, and pedosphere) and how they affect current issues and sustainability at local to global scales.
    • Apply knowledge of physical geography concepts gained in the classroom to propose solutions to current real-world problems and address issues of sustainability.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/2/17

  
  •  

    GEOG 111 - The Power of Maps


    Description:
    Investigates the problem-solving potential and societal implications of maps and location technologies, including online maps, GPS, geographic information systems (GIS), Google Earth, and virtual reality. Discusses critical map reading, privacy, and mapping for social justice. Course will be offered every year (Fall and Winter).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain how people make maps using digital technology, and discuss possibilities for addressing real-world problems using digital and online maps.
    • Discuss and put in practice the science of how maps communicate, including the elements of measurement, spatial reference, database technology, and artistic design that allow the earth to be represented digitally and on paper.
    • Demonstrate how GPS and other satellite-based navigation systems can operate in tandem with spatial databases to solve problems.
    • Tell what a geographic information system (GIS) is and list career opportunities that use GIS, maps, and other location technologies.
    • Use an online mapping and analysis program to demonstrate how GIS can support decision making
    • Explain how social and cultural contexts and design choices by a cartographer influence maps. Interpret maps from the news and current events with a critical eye.
    • Discuss privacy and surveillance issues associated with maps and location technology.
    • Explain how maps can empower. Give examples of how maps have been used for social justice, sustainability, and crisis response.
    • Explain how maps can endanger and marginalize. Give examples of how maps have been used for earning money, obtaining power, instigating conflict, and enabling violence.
    • Use virtual reality and 3D visualizations to enhance an understanding of a place or tell a story more effectively through maps.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/16/17
  
  •  

    GEOG 208 - Our Human World


    Description:
    Explores the historical diffusion and contemporary spatial distribution of cultures, religions, and languages. Evaluates how these features interact with economic and political systems to create distinctive places at scales ranging from local to global. Formerly GEOG 108, student may not receive credit for both. SB-Foundations of Human Adaptations and Behavior. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Spring and Summer).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Define the role of space, place, scale, environment, and location in shaping the cultures of the world including religious faith, language, and other attributes.
    • Explain the relevance of geographical theories including territoriality, the demographic transition, and the new international division of labor to the relationships among places, individuals, and society.
    • Employ human geography techniques taught in class to analyze real-world data.
    • Apply theories and concepts taught in the course with information collected by the student to examine a cultural phenomenon.
    • Analyze the ways in which people organize space to foster either greater equality or greater inequality in societies.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/2/17

  
  •  

    GEOG 250 - Resource Exploitation and Conservation


    Description:
    Explores the historical, cultural, political, socio-economic perspectives of natural resource use, extraction, and sustainability at local to global scales. Students will examine resources and decision-making as citizens of campus, the Pacific Northwest, and the World. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Spring, Summer).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the variety of natural resources present in our world today (for example, perpetual, renewable, non-renewable, and potential resources) and the principal methods of extraction, exploitation, and conservation.
    • Identify and explain the physical, social, economic, technological, and political factors that determine natural resource availability, consumption, and conservation.
    • Interpret local and regional landscapes in terms of historical processes, policy, and patterns of natural resource extraction
    • Assess specific resources (agriculture/food production, energy, water, forest, marine resources) in terms of the factors fostering overexploitation and to assess alternative solutions for conservation.

     Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    12/7/17

  
  •  

    GEOG 273 - Geography of Rivers


    Description:
    Drawing on local, regional, and global case studies, this course examines rivers as bio-physical systems, impacted by natural and anthropogenic forces. Focus is placed on human development of floodplains and ecosystem functioning within riparian areas. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Recognize the variety of diverse cultural, social, political, and economic drivers and institutions present in modifying riparian corridors.  Students will analyze how these diverse stakeholders and institutions affect issues of equality, access to resources, and human well-being.
    • Define and explain the economic impacts, social processes, and political factors that influence floodplain development and management.  Students will analyze how these modifications affect the sustainability and ecologic viability of floodplain ecosystems.
    • Analyze the relevant laws and policies governing water management and how they affect water allocations, and ecological conditions.  Students will describe the adaptation of environmental laws and management policies that impact riverine infrastructure and its use.
    • Describe the adaptation of environmental laws, the theories behind the creation of those management policies that impact riverine infrastructure, their use, and their impact on sustainability and ecologic viability of floodplain ecosystems.  
    • Recognize the ecological impacts anthropogenic modification of riparian habitats has on various species.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/2/17

  
  •  

    GEOG 279 - Geography of the West


    Description:
    In-depth field examination of the complex, physical, human, and resource issues of one or more of the varied sub regions of western North America. May be repeated for up to 12 credits under a different topic.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and describe the physica, human, and resource geography of the area studied.
    • Collect and analyze data on physical, human, and resource issues of the area studied, then communicate the results of the analysis to their peers.
    • Demonstrate proficiency in functioning as a member of a group in an outdoor setting.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    01/20/2010
  
  •  

    GEOG 290 - Cooperative Education Field Experience


    Description:
    Individualized field experience with business, industry, government, or other agency. Requires a student learning plan, cooperating employer supervisors, and faculty coordinator. By permission. May be repeated for up to 10 credits. Grade will either be S or U.

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above.

    Credits: (1-5)

  
  •  

    GEOG 298 - Special Topics


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

  
  •  

    GEOG 299 - Seminar


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-5)

  
  •  

    GEOG 301 - Introduction to GIS and Maps


    Description:
    Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with an emphasis on cartographic communication, map use in a digital environment, and the basics of ESRI GIS software. Formerly GEOG 203, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Fall, Winter, and Spring).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of basic cartographic principles such as scale, direction, and symbolization.
    • Provide evidence of competence in describing location using standardized coordinate systems and datums.
    • Show ability to interpret basic terrain symbolization on maps (e.g. contour lines).
    • Exhibit knowledge of GIS software, including basic data management and display.
    • Provide evidence of cartographic interpretation skills that may be used in a variety of other geography classes.
    • Combine knowledge learned through lecture, labs, reading, and software skills.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    03/03/2016
  
  •  

    GEOG 303 - GIS and Data Management


    Description:
    Geographic Information Systems (GIS), focusing on data acquisition, data management, data errors, classification, and implementation considerations. Applied experience using GIS software. Course will be offered every year (Fall and Winter).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: GEOG 301 (Formerly GEOG 203).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of data representation in GIS (raster, vector, attributes, time, topology), data types, data quality, metadata, and data capture).
    • Have knowledge of general GIS functionality, including display, overlay, and analysis.
    • Interpret basic terrain symbolization on maps (e.g. contour lines).
    • Demonstrate knowledge of computer-based skills using modern GIS software.
    • Have knowledge of the general context of GIS , including: What is GIS and how is it used? History and trends in GIS.
    • Combine knowledge learned through lecture, labs, reading, and software skills.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    03/31/2016
  
  •  

    GEOG 304 - Economic Geography


    Description:
    Geographic survey of human livelihood and interaction with the environment. Agriculture, industry, and urbanization are examined in the context of an increasingly interdependent world system. Course will be offered on even numbered years (Winter).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Learn the differences between primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary economic activities, particularly the different factors that affect how they are located.
    • Develop knowledge of economic models of how different activities are located within and among regions.
    • Learn how human activities have transformed the environment and how these activities are motivated by economic incentives.
    • Gain computer skills through lab exercises to obtain information and data from on­line sources and learn how to use computer technologies in appropriate ways to present and analyze that data.
    • Obtain knowledge of an economic issue in the region by doing a research paper on a topic within the Pacific Northwest, taking pictures/slides for final project presentation. This written and oral presentation will improve their research, writing, and presentation skills.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    03/01/2001
  
  •  

    GEOG 305 - Introduction to Land Use Planning


    Description:
    Investigation into the process and practice of urban and regional planning. Emphasis on historical development, legal foundations, and techniques of planning in the United States. Course will be offered every year (Winter).

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    GEOG 306 - Transportation Geography and Planning


    Description:
    Introduction to the planning and spatial analysis of transportation networks. Evaluation of the economic, environmental, and social consequences of major transportation modes. Application of transportation planning principles at the local, regional, and national scales. Course will be offered on on odd numbered years (Fall).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze a transportation problem from a spatial perspective.
    • Perform and interpret transportation network analyses.
    • Evaluate the role of transportation in affecting contemporary patterns of economic development.
    • Develop a viable urban or regional transportation plan.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    2/15/18
  
  •  

    GEOG 308 - Cultural Geography


    Description:
    Spatial aspects of human cultures and landscapes. Course will be offered on odd numbered years (Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: GEOG 208 (Formerly GEOG 108) or instructor permission.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify key elements of human culture and their manifestations in the landscape at a variety of scales.
    • Identify and analyze the socio- economic, political, religious, and technological forces affecting the connections between places.
    • Describe the diffusion and adaptation of a cultural trait or technological innovation effectively using concepts taught  in the course.
    • Develop an understanding of the emergence of cultural geography as a sub discipline, including major paradigms and approaches to the geography of culture.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    4/7/2016
  
  •  

    GEOG 311 - Qualitative Methods in Geography (Put on reserve 9/16/17)


    Description:
    Introduces students with qualitative research methods in geography with particular attention to participatory observation, interviews, data transcription, oral histories, focus groups, descriptive narrative, archival research, document analysis, data coding and interpretation strategies. (Put on reserve 9/16/17. Will go inactive 8/24/2020.)

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Explain how qualitative research contributes to scientific knowledge.
    • Master data collection and analysis skills to conduct qualitative research independently and proficiently.
    • Demonstrate knowledge about research ethics and know how to practice them when conducting research.
    • Identify the need for engaged scholarship, and community based research.
    • Conduct sensitive research that is aware of power dynamics in the research relationship, and to mitigate imbalances through strategies of reflexivity, situation, transparency, accountability and reciprocity.
    • Survey critical insights from post-structural, postcolonial and feminist literature on qualitative methodologies.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    04/18/2013
  
  •  

    GEOG 315 - Geography of Oceania (Put on Reserve 9/16/16.)


    Description:
    Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands. Formerly GEOG 415, students may not recieve credit for both. (Put on Reserve 9/16/16. Last taught in 2013. Will go inactive 8/24/19.)

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the locations of main cultural and political features of Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the landforms, climate, and biota that characterize Oceania as a region.
    • Identify the historical, cultural, physical, and economic characteristics of Oceania as a region.
    • Develop in-depth knowledge of one of the Pacific Island groups, including physical and cultural landscapes and contemporary problems and issues.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    04/18/2013
  
  •  

    GEOG 325 - Field Methods in Geography


    Description:
    Introduction to geographic field research. Survey and application of techniques and methods in physical and/or human geography. Includes research design, data collection and organization, interpretation and analysis of results. Permission of instructor. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the basic tools, techniques, and methods used for field data collection in physical and/or human geographic inquiry.
    • Explain the key techniques and theoretical approaches of different geographic field research methods.
    • Demonstrate the ability to evaluate appropriate data collection methods for specific types of field research.
    • Design a field‐based study, collect, organize, and analyze data, and integrate scientific literature to interpret and summarize results.
    • Demonstrate the ability to work effectively as part of a group in a field context.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/15/18
  
  •  

    GEOG 330 - Airphoto Interpretation


    Description:
    Introduction to airborne photography and the tools and techniques to apply this photography to geographical issues. Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week. Course fee required.  Formerly GEOG 410, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Fall).

    Prerequisites:
    Corequisite: GEOG 301 (Formerly GEOG 203).

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of scale, projections, theories and physics of light by applying them on specific assignments.
    • Interpret topographic maps and aerial photographs using metadata and physical keys of scale.
    • Explain how and where to access analog and digital maps and aerial photos on the CWU campus, in the public and private sphere for use in different projects.
    • Collect field data and then construct a dataset overlaying field data on aerial photographs, and maps.
    • Calculate height, distance, and area using aerial photo and digital imagery.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    3/15/18
  
  •  

    GEOG 346 - Political Geography


    Description:

    The spatial structure of political units. The effect of political, economic, social, and Earth resource factors on the areas, shapes, and boundaries of these units, and on the distribution of populations and institutions. Course will be offered every year (Winter).

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    GEOG 352 - Geography of North America


    Description:
    Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of the United States, Canada, and Mexico. Course will be offered on even numbered years (Winter).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the locations of main cultural and political features of North America.
    • Identify the physical features and processes that characterize North American sub regions.
    • Analyze the interconnection of physical and human systems in North America.
    • Interpret the causes and frameworks of contemporary political, social, economic, and environmental issues in North America.
    • Identify and interpret the historical foundations of North American culture, society, politics, economies, and landscape change.
    • Analyze the complexity of North American cultural landscapes at multiple scales.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    04/18/2013
  
  •  

    GEOG 355 - Geography of the Pacific Northwest


    Description:
    Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of the Pacific Northwest. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Learn locations of major physical and human geographic features of the United States Canada and Mexico, including mountain chains, rivers and lakes, urban areas, and political units such as states and provinces.
    • Develop knowledge of diverse environments of the three countries, including geologic and geomorphologic conditions, climate and weather patterns, and floral and faunal assemblages.
    • Develop a knowledge of aboriginal (First Nations) population distributions and lifeways on the continent, of colonial invasion and settlement, natural resource exploitation schemes, and subsequent economic and political developments leading to transportation improvements, industrialization, and urbanization.
    • Learn the art of map interpretation using both physical and thematic cartography.
    • Improve their research, writing and presentation skills.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    03/01/2001
  
  •  

    GEOG 361 - Soils


    Description:
    Properties, factors, processes, and classification of Earth’s soils, past and present. Four hours lecture and three hours of laboratory or field trips each week. GEOG 361 and GEOG 461 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: GEOG 107.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the various soil processes and factors, and the resulting soil properties.
    • Communicate in the language of the discipline.
    • Apply the basic concepts of soils to the various pedogenic processes.
    • Demonstrate the use of the various tools and techniques of soils.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    02/17/2011
  
  •  

    GEOG 366 - Geography of the Middle East


    Description:
    Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of the Middle East. Course will be offered on even numbered years (Fall).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and interpret the principal physical, environmental, demographic, cultural, economic and geopolitical characteristics of the Middle East.
    • Identify place names and major physical and cultural features of the Middle East.
    • Describe and interpret issues surrounding the Arab Israeli conflict, including social, political, and economic characteristics.
    • Redraw the maps of the Middle East to reflect knowledge learned about the region using computer mapping programs.
    • Analyze current issues relevant to a Middle Eastern country of their choice, keep a well written journal of these events and be prepared to report on this in class.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    03/21/2013
  
  •  

    GEOG 368 - Geography of Middle America


    Description:
    Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean. Course will not have an established scheduling pattern.

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the locations of main cultural and political features of Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean.
    • Identify the physical features and processes that characterize middle America as a region.
    • Analyze the interconnection of physical and human systems in the region.
    • Analyze contemporary political, social, economic, and environmental issues in Middle America.
    • Link the historical foundations of Middle American culture, society, politics, economies, and landscape change to contemporary regional characteristics.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    03/21/2013
  
  •  

    GEOG 370 - Geography of South America


    Description:
    Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of South America. Course will be offered on odd numbered years (Fall).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the locations of main cultural and political features of South America.
    • Identify the physical features and processes that characterize South America as a region.
    • Analyze the interconnection of physical and human systems in the region.
    • Analyze contemporary political, social, economic, and environmental issues in South America.
    • Link the historical foundations of South American culture, society, politics, economies, and landscape change to contemporary regional characteristics.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    1/19/2017
  
  •  

    GEOG 371 - Geography of Europe


    Description:
    Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of Europe. Course will be offered on odd numbered years (Winter).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify the locations of the main economic, cultural and political features of Europe
    • Identify the geophysical features and processes that characterize Europe as a distinct region.
    • Analyze the interconnection of physical and human systems in the region.
    • Analyze contemporary economic, political, cultural, and environmental issues in Europe.
    • Link the historical foundations of European society, economics, politics, culture, and landscape change to contemporary regional characteristics.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    04/18/2013
  
  •  

    GEOG 372 - Geography of Russia


    Description:
    Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of Russia. Course will be offered on odd numbered years (Fall).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the principal physical, environmental, demographic, cultural, economic and geopolitical characteristics of Russia and its neighbors.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of place names, and major physical and cultural features of the region.
    • Give a coherent, concise, and effective oral presentation describing and analyzing a place, problem or trait in the region.
    • Analyze the impact of the historical geography of the Soviet Union on the new countries that have replaced it.
    • Analyze an issue concerning Russia and its neighbors through careful research and writing.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    03/21/2013
  
  •  

    GEOG 373 - Water Resources


    Description:
    Foundation course for understanding the physical and social dimensions of water resource use on a global scale. Special attention paid to issues in the American West. GEOG 107 is recommended. Course will be offered every year (Winter).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Know the flows and storages of water through the hydrologic system and how it is measured.
    • Know the temporal and spatial variations in the water resources of different areas.
    • Know the history of US. water development and its legal framework.
    • Know the alternative water management strategies and their consequences.
    • Know the selected contemporary water resource issues (i.e. interbasin transfers. Snake River dam breaching).
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    11/16/2000
  
  •  

    GEOG 375 - Geography of Asia


    Description:
    Examination of the physical and cultural geography, human-environment interactions, landscapes, and regional diversity of Asia.  Formerly GEOG 475, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered on even numbered years (Spring).

    Credits: (4)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Demonstrate knowledge of the principal physical, environmental, demographic, cultural, economic, and geopolitical characteristics of Northeast and Southeast Asia and the interaction among those systems.
    • Analyze the economic, cultural, political, demographic, and technological forces affecting specific places in Northeast and Southeast Asia.
    • Give a coherent, concise, and effective oral presentation describing and analyzing a place, problem or trait in Asia.
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the basic place name geography of Northeast and Southeast Asia.
    • Analyze a complex issue in the context of Asia through careful research and writing.

     Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    04/18/2013

  
  •  

    GEOG 379 - Geography of the West


    Description:
    In-depth field examination of the complex physical, human, and resource issues of one or more of the varied sub-regions of western North America. May be repeated for up to 12 credits under a different topic.

    Credits: (1-12)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and describe the physica, human, and resource geography of the area studied.
    • Collect and analyze data on physical, human, and resource issues of the area studied, then communicate the results of the analysis to their peers.
    • Demonstrate proficiency in functioning as a member of a group in an outdoor setting.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    01/20/2010
  
  •  

    GEOG 381 - Urban Geography


    Description:
    The spatial and size distribution of cities as explained by their historical development and major functions. Analysis of the internal structure of cities and the results of urban growth.  Formerly GEOG 481, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered on even numbered years (Fall).

    Credits: (4)

  
  •  

    GEOG 382 - Hydrology


    Description:
    Provides a comprehensive introduction to both the global and local hydrologic cycle. Covers constituent processes, their measurements and quantitative relationships, plus basic water quality parameters. GEOG 382 and GEOG 482 are layered courses; students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Fall).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: GEOG 107.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Interpret the emergence of cities in both historical and contemporary eras. They will identify the benefits (and costs) of cities in regards to a wide variety of issues, including: economies, the environment, cultures, etc.
    • Compare the urbanization process around the globe, and discuss bow it is changing global cultures and economies.
    • Identify the processes of urban change and growth, and analyze the economic, social, cultural, and political forces that shape urban landscapes.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    02/17/2011
  
  •  

    GEOG 386 - Geomorphology


    Description:
    Descriptive and interpretive examination of the Earth’s landforms and the processes and factors that shape these features over space and time. Four lectures and three hours laboratory or field trips each week. GEOG 386, GEOG 486, and GEOL 386 are cross-listed courses; students may not receive credit for more than one. Course will be offered every year (Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisites: (GEOL 101 or GEOL 102 or GEOL 103  and GEOL 101LAB) or GEOG 107.

    Credits: (5)

  
  •  

    GEOG 387 - Biogeography


    Description:
    Investigates the functional relationships between biophysical processes and their spatial and temporal patterns at various scales. Introduces approaches to land systems analysis focusing upon ecosystems. GEOG 387 and GEOG 487 are layered courses, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered every year (Spring).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: GEOG 107.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Identify and describe various principal biogeographical processes and systems.
    • Communicate in the language of the discipline.
    • Describe and analyze the physical processes that generate biogeographical patterns of life on Earth.
    • Research a topic related to biogeography, write a scientific paper about that research, and articulately present the research to the class.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    02/02/2012
  
  •  

    GEOG 388 - Weather and Climate


    Description:
    Elements, factors and processes affecting Earth’s climates, present, past, and future. Four hours lecture and two hours laboratory/field per week. Course fee required. GEOG 388 and GEOG 488 are equivalent courses, students may not receive credit for both. Course will be offered on even numbered years (Winter).

    Prerequisites:
    Prerequisite: GEOG 107.

    Credits: (5)

    Learner Outcomes:
    Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

    • Analyze, describe, and diagram the basics of the Earth’s atmosphere and major atmospheric processes including energy, pressure, wind, precipitation, air masses, fronts, and storms.
    • Communicate in the language of the discipline.
    • Recognize the relationships and linkages between the parts· of the Earth’s energy budget and explain the factors controlling temperature and precipitation patterns on Earth and to describe the distribution of climates of the World.
    • Describe the impacts of weather on human activity and impacts of humans on climate.
    • Understand the tools and technologies used to produce weather forecasts and to be able to locate and interpret weather maps and satellite images available on the www.
    • Describe and analyze past, present, and future trends in natural and anthropogenic climate change.
    Learner Outcomes Approval Date:
    03/21/2013
  
  •  

    GEOG 396 - Individual Study


    Description:
    May be repeated if subject is different.

    Credits: (1-6)

 

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