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    Central Washington University
   
 
  Oct 20, 2017
 
 
    
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

General Education Course Descriptions


ABS 110. Expressive African American Culture (5). An interdisciplinary exploration of a variety of perspectives in African American folk culture, from oral expressions developed during slavery to contemporary rap and stand-up comedy. The course includes an overview of the worldwide contribution of black oral performative art. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C- or higher. AH-Literature and Humanities.

AIS 101. Pre-contact Period of American Indians, Pre-AD 1492 (5). An interdisciplinary approach explores the lifeways and environments of American Indians prior to European contact and settlement. Sources of pre-contact information consist of the archaeological, oral history, and paleoenvironmental records. SB-Perspectives on Cultures, Experiences of U.S. (W).

AIS 102. Contact Period of American Indians (5). An interdisciplinary study of the life ways and environments of American Indians during the period of European contact. Sources of contact period information come from the archaeological, American Indian and European written and oral history records. SB-Perspectives on Cultures, Experiences of U.S. (W).

AIS 103. Emergence of Contemporary American Indians (5). An interdisciplinary approach explores the emergence of contemporary American Indians after AD 1890 with an emphasis on social, political, and cultural aspects. Sources of information about this period come from written and oral history. SB-Perspectives on Cultures, Experiences of U.S. (W).

ANTH 107. General Anthropology (5). Human biological and cultural adaptations: survey of concepts, methods, and perspectives on past and present. SB-Foundations of Human Adaptation, Behavior.

ANTH 110. Introduction to Biological Anthropology (5). A survey of the history, philosophy and theory of biological anthropology including biological relationships to other primate forms, the fossil record, and evolutionary adaptations. Corequisite: ANTH 110LAB. NS-Patterns, Connections, Natural World.

ANTH 120. Introduction to Archaeology (5). Introduction to the concepts, methods, and development of archaeology. SB-Foundations of Human Adaptation, Behavior (W).

ANTH 130. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (5). Understanding human cultures: concepts, methods, and basic data involved in the comparative study of human cultural adaptations. SB-Perspectives on World Cultures.

ANTH 314. Human Variation and Adaptation in Living Populations (4). Survey of genetic, morphological and physiological variability of living human populations and their biological source mechanisms. Current population dynamics are used to project future alternatives for change. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. NS-Applications Natural Science.

ART 101. Introduction to Western Art (5). The visual arts as an expression of the human experience. Does not apply to the art major. AH-Aesthetic Experience.

ART 102. Introduction to Non-Western Art (5). A survey of non-western painting, sculpture, and architecture. This course does not apply to the art major. AH-Aesthetic Experience.

AST 102. Introduction to Asian Studies (3). An interdisciplinary introduction to the study of Asia; emphasizing geography, history, culture, and economics. SB-Perspectives on World Cultures (W).

BIOL 101. Fundamentals of Biology (5). Biology in the modern world. Four hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. May not be counted toward a major or minor in the department of biological sciences. NS-Fund Disc Phys, Biological Science (L).

BIOL 200. Plants in the Modern World (5). Plants and their significance in the world today. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week. (Not open to majors in the biological sciences.) May not be counted toward a major or minor in the department of biological sciences. NS-Patterns, Connections, Natural World (W) (L).

BIOL 201. Human Physiology (5). Organ systems of humans. Not open to students with credit in BIOL 455; may not be counted toward a major or minor in the department of biological sciences. NS-Patterns, Connections, Natural World.

BIOL 300. Introduction to Evolution (5). The evidence, theories, and mechanisms of the evolution of life, including man. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. May not be counted toward a major in the department of biological sciences. NS-Patterns, Connections, Natural World.

BIOL 302. Human Ecology (5). Basic concepts of ecology with emphasis on ecosystems and populations and how human activities and attitudes relate to these basic concepts. May not be counted toward a major in the department of biological sciences. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. NS-Applications Natural Science.

CHEM 101. Contemporary Chemistry (5). Chemical principles and their application to contemporary problems of human beings and their environment. Four hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory weekly. NS-Applications Natural Science (L).

CHEM 111. Introduction to Chemistry (4). Chemical principles of the compositions, structure, properties, and changes of matter. Designed for students in certain health science programs. Four lectures weekly. NS-Fund Disc Phys Biological Sciences.

CHEM 111LAB. Introductory Chemistry Laboratory (1). Introduction to basic chemistry techniques. Two hours laboratory weekly. Co- or prerequisite: CHEM 111. NS-Fund Disc Phys Biological Sciences (L).

CHEM 181. General Chemistry I (4). This course introduces chemistry concepts such as atoms and molecules, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, thermochemistry, electronic structure of the atom and periodicity, and chemical bonding. Prerequisites: strongly recommend high school chemistry and qualification for MATH 153 or math placement exam. NS-Fund Disc Phys and Biological (L).

CHEM 181LAB. General Chemistry Laboratory I (1). This laboratory supports hands-on, inquiry-based approaches to exploring topics presented in CHEM 181. Three hours of laboratory weekly. Co- or prerequisite: CHEM 181. NS-Fund Disc Phys Biological Sciences (L).

COM 302. Intercultural Communication (4). The objective of this course is to give the participants the skills and understanding necessary to improve communication with peoples of other nations and cultures. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. SB-Perspectives on World Cultures (W).

CS 101. Computer Basics (4). Integrated, project-based course using student-produced working materials in the form of a mini thesis. Microsoft Office tools are learned in a web-based practical application environment. Basic Skills 6 - Computer Fundamentals.

CS 105. The Logical Basis of Computing (4). Problem solving, algorithm development, complexity, computability. Representation of algorithms as computer programs, data, ecision and control inherent sources of error. Basic Skills 5 – Reasoning.

ECON 101. Economic Issues (5). For the student who desires a general knowledge of economics. Applications of economic principles to current social and political problems. ECON 101 cannot be substituted for either ECON 201 or 202. SB-Perspectives, Cultures, Experiences of U.S.

ECON 102. World Economic Issues (5). An introduction to current international issues related to international trade and finance, economic development, and comparative economic systems. SB-Perspectives on World Cultures (W).

ECON 201. Principles of Economics Micro (5). The function of the market system in the allocation of scarce resources, determination of prices and output in competitive and monopolistic markets, and distribution of income. The role of government in the market economy. SB-Perspectives, Cultures, Experiences of U.S.

ENG 101. Composition I: Critical Reading and Responding (4). Develops skills necessary for academic writing, including summarizing, reading sources critically and responding to them, synthesizing multiple perspectives, and using academic writing conventions. Required of all students except those who have passed an exemption examination. Students must earn a minimum grade of C- or above to enroll in ENG 102. Prerequisite: appropriate test scores or have satisfactorily completed Transitional English. Basic Skills 2 - English Comp I.

ENG 102. Composition II: Reasoning and Research (4). Develops skills in research-based academic argument through assignments involving evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of multiple sources. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C- or higher. Basic Skills 2 - English Comp II.

ENG 105. The Literary Imagination: An Introduction to Literature (5). Human experience as it is imagined, interpreted, and made significant in the poetry, prose, fiction, and drama of the major writers of the world. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C- or higher. AH-Literature and Humanities (W).

ENG 247. Multicultural Literature (5). Literary themes examined through the comparison of works from various cultures. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C- or higher. AH-Literature and Humanities (W).

ENG 347. Global Perspectives in Literature (5). An introduction to contemporary non-western and third world literature. Prerequisites: sophomore standing or above and ENG 101 with a grade of C- or higher. AH-Literature and Humanities (W).

ENST 201. Earth as an Ecosystem (5). Introduction to the concept of our planet as a finite environment with certain properties essential for life. The dynamic nature of the earth’s physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes and their interrelated “systems” aspects furnishes the thrust of this treatment. NS-Patterns and Connection Natural.

ENST 202. Ecosystems, Resources, Population, and Culture (5). The physical and cultural dimensions of environmental problems with particular emphasis given to the interaction between ecosystems, basic resources, population dynamics, and culture. NS-Application Natural Science.

ENST 310. Energy and Society (5). Through classroom and field experience, students will examine society’s use of, and dependence upon, energy. Students will become more discerning citizens, able to take part in local, national, and global energy discussions. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. NS-Application Natural Science (W).

ETS 101. Ethnic Awareness (5). Awareness and understanding of the problems facing the American people in the area of race and ethnic relations, primarily focusing on ethnic minorities. The nature and scope of relationships between minority groups and the majority in the United States. SB-Perspectives on U.S. (W).

FS 310. Contemporary Family Issues (4). An introduction to social issues that impact family life. Current issues pertaining to individual and family relationships are assessed from an interdisciplinary perspective. SB-Found Human Adaptations (W).

FS 337. Human Sexuality (4). The biophysical, psychosocial, and behavioral aspects of sexuality with emphasis on making responsible sexual decisions and promoting healthy relationships. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. SB-Found Human Adaptations.

FVS 250. Introduction to Film and Video Studies (5). Overview of film and video studies, including film viewing and analysis, motion picture language, film genres, and production aspects. Emphasis on the social context, cultural influences, and aesthetic qualities of film. Prerequisite: ENG 101 with a grade of C- or higher. AH-Aesthetic Experience (W).

GEOG 101. World Regional Geography (5). Regions and nations of the world together with the changing elements of the physical and human environment that support them. SB-Perspective on World Culture.

GEOG 107. Introduction to Physical Geography (5). The complex weather, climate, water, landforms, soils, and biota of Earth’s physical environments over space and time. Four hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory each week. NS-Patterns and Connection Natural.

GEOG 108. Introduction to Human Geography (5). Distribution and spatial variation of population, settlement patterns, cultural elements of language, religion, and lifeways, and the economic and political organization of the planet. SB-Found Human Adaptations.

GEOG 273. Geography of Rivers (5). Global, regional, and local physical and cultural patterns and processes within river basins. NS-Application Natural Science.

GEOL 101. Physical Geology (4). An introduction emphasizing the origin and nature of the common rocks and the continually changing features of the earth’s crust. Four lectures per week. Co- or prerequisite: GEOL 101LAB. NS-Fund Disc Phys and Biological.

GEOL 101LAB. Physical Geology Laboratory (1). Application of map study to geological processes and land forms, identification of rocks and minerals, and local field trips. Two hours laboratory per week. Co-requisite: GEOL 101 or GEOL 102 or GEOL 103. NS-Fund Disc Phys and Biological (L).

GEOL 103. Geology of Washington (4). Fundamentals of geology applied to the state of Washington. Topics include Washington’s volcanic, earthquake, tectonic, and glacial activity. Four lectures per week. Corequisite: GEOL 101LAB. NS-Patterns and Connection Natural.

GEOL 107. Volcanoes, Earthquakes, and Civilization (5). The role of natural geologic processes such as volcanoes, earthquakes, and climate change in shaping the earth, the environment and human civilization. NS-Patterns and Connection Natural. Four hour lecture per week plus required field trips.

GEOL 108. Introduction to Environmental Geology (5). Interaction between human activity and geological processes. Scientific discussion of global environmental issues such as ozone depletion, climate change, geologic hazards, natural resources, and water use. NS-Application Natural Science.

GEOL 302. Oceans and Atmosphere (4). Introduction to Earth’s climate and the hydrologic cycle through study of the ocean-atmosphere system. Chemical and physical changes will be studied over time scales ranging from millions of years to days. Will include a field trip. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. NS-Patterns and Connection Natural.

HED 101. Health Essentials (4). Fundamental patterns and understanding of human interaction with natural and man made environments intended to help students make informed judgments. SB-Found Human Adaptations.

HIST 101. World Civilization to 1500 (5). Origins and development of the major world civilizations to the 15th century. A comparative study of their political, social, and economic institutions, and their religious and intellectual backgrounds. SB-Perspective on World Culture (W).

HIST 102. World Civilization: 1500-1815 (5). A comparative survey of political, social, economic, and cultural developments. SB-Perspective on World Culture (W). For general education (breadth) credit, it is preferred that a student be enrolled in or have completed ENG 101.

HIST 103. World Civilization Since 1815 (5). A comparative survey of political, social, economic, and cultural developments. SB-Perspective on World Culture (W). For general education (breadth) credit, it is preferred that a student be enrolled in or have completed ENG 101.

HIST 143. United States History to 1865 (5). The Colonial, Revolutionary, and National periods. SB-Perspectives on Cultures and experiences of U.S. (W).

HIST 144. United States History Since 1865 (5). Reconstruction, Industrial America, and 20th-century urban America. SB-Perspectives on Cultures and experiences of U.S. (W). Recommended ENG 101.

HUM 101. Exploring Cultures in the Ancient World (5). An interdisciplinary exploration from literature, history, philosophy, and the arts of selected major ancient civilizations in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas from their beginnings through the 15th century. Prerequisites: ENG 101 with a grade of C- or higher. AH-Literature and Humanities (W).

HUM 102. Exploring Cultures From 16th through 19th Centuries (5). An interdisciplinary exploration of selected literature, history, philosophy, and the arts in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas from the 16th through the 19th centuries. Prerequisites: ENG 101 with a grade of C- or higher. AH-Literature and Humanities (W).

HUM 103. Exploring Cultures in Modern and Contemporary Societies (5). An interdisciplinary exploration of literature, history, philosophy, and the arts of selected world civilizations of the 20th century. Prerequisites: ENG 101 with a grade of C- or higher. AH-Literature and Humanities (W).

IET 101. Modern Technology and Energy (5). A study of how basic scientific principles are applied daily in industrial societies through a survey of transportation, energy and power, construction, and consumer product technologies. NS-Application Natural Science.

IT 101. Computer Applications (3). Basic skills in Windows, word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentations. Basic Skills 6 – Computing.

LAJ 102. Introduction to Law and Justice (5). This course will focus on the role of law in society and will examine both the criminal and civil law system, as well as, the function of law in social change and social control. SB - Perspectives on Cultures and experiences of U.S.

LLAS 102. An Introduction to Latino and Latin American Studies (5). A multi-disciplinary introduction of Latino and Latin American studies, presented in three main components: People and the Land, The Environment and the Human Condition, and Socio-Political Spectrum. SB-Perspective on World Culture (W).

MATH 101. Mathematics in the Modern World (5). Selected topics from the historical development and applications of mathematics together with their relationship to the development of our present society. Prerequisites: either at least 500 on the SAT, 19 on the ACT, a Compass test score of either 50-Pre-Algebra, 26-Algebra, 31-College Algebra, or 31-Trigonometry, or completed MATH 100B or a higher level math class. Basic Skills 4 – Math.

MATH 102. Mathematical Decision Making (5). Selected topics from probability, statistics and mathematical decision making with real-world application. Prerequisites: either at least 500 on the SAT, 19 on the ACT, a Compass test score of either 50-Pre-Algebra, 26-Algebra, 31-College Algebra, or 31-Trigonometry, or completed MATH 100B or a higher level math class. Basic Skills 5 – Logic.

MATH 130. Finite Mathematics (5). The language of sets, counting procedures, introductory probability, and decision making, introductory descriptive statistics. Meets General Education “reasoning” requirement and prepares student for introductory statistics courses in various departments. Prerequisites: either at least 500 on the SAT, 19 on the ACT, a Compass test score of either 50-Pre-Algebra, 26-Algebra, 31-College Algebra, or 31-Trigonometry, or completed MATH 100B or a higher level math class. Basic Skills 5 – Logic.

MATH 153. Pre-calculus Mathematics I (5). A foundation course which stresses those algebraic and elementary function concepts together with the manipulative skills essential to the study of calculus. Prerequisites: either MATH 100C with a grade of C or higher; or a score of 18 or higher on the Intermediate Math Placement Test, or a score of 66 or higher on the Compass Algebra test. Basic Skills 4 – Math.

MATH 154. Pre-calculus Mathematics II (5). A continuation of MATH 153 with emphasis on trigonometric functions, vectors, systems of equations, the complex numbers, and an introduction to analytic geometry. Prerequisites: MATH 153 with a grade of C or higher, a score of 17 or higher on the Advanced Math Placement Test, or a score of 46 or higher on the Compass College Algebra Test. Basic Skills 4 – Math.

MATH 164. Foundations of Arithmetic (5). Structure of the real number system. Properties of and operations on integers, rationals, decimal representation, percentages, proportion, graphing, and elementary problem solving. Recommended for the prospective elementary school teacher. Prerequisites: 45 earned credits, and either at least a 500 on the SAT, a 19 on the ACT, or a score of 50 on the Compass test. Basic Skills 4 – Math.

MATH 170. Intuitive Calculus (5). An intuitive approach to the differential and integral calculus specifically designed for students in the behavioral, managerial, and social sciences. Prerequisites: MATH 153 with a grade of C or higher or a score of 19 or higher on the Advanced Placement Test. Basic Skills 4 - Math Not open to students with credit for MATH 172 or higher.

MATH 172. Calculus I (5). Theory, techniques, and applications of differentiation and integration of the elementary functions. Prerequisites: MATH 154 with a grade of C or higher, a score of 19 on the Advanced Math Placement Test, or a score of 46 or higher on the Compass Trigonometry test. Basic Skills 4 – Math.

MUS 101. History of Jazz (5). America’s only indigenous art form, late 1800s to present. Emphasis on artists and cultural/societal forces shaping music’s evolution. Extensive listening, reading; required attendance of performances. AH-Aesthetic Experience.

MUS 102. Introduction to Music (5). Fundamental musical concepts (melody, harmony, rhythm, form, etc.) through illustrations of the instrumental and vocal music of major composers from the earliest period through the present day. AH-Aesthetic Experience.

MUS 104. Introduction to Musical Studies (3). Attitudes and concepts relevant to the music profession. Listening repertoire and reference materials. Designed for entering music majors. Basic Skills 1 - GenEd Colloq.

NUTR 101. Introduction to Human Nutrition (5). Fundamental nutritional concepts as related to health. Four hours lecture and one hour discussion per week. NS-Application Natural Science.

PED 161. Cultural History of Dance (4). A survey course in the evolution of dance through the ages with emphasis on the major forces that have influenced dance in the 20th century. AH-Aesthetic Experience.

PHIL 101. Introduction to Philosophy (5). Introduction to the basic themes, thinkers, and topics of philosophy. The mind-body problem, good versus evil, knowledge, truth, goodness, and beauty. AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W).

PHIL 115. The Meaning of Life (5). Original sources from diverse philosophical traditions explore various responses to the question of the meaning of life, considering the most significant human aspirations and values. AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W).

PHIL 201. Introduction to Logic (5). Formal principles, methods and techniques for analyzing, constructing, and evaluating arguments. Topics include validity, soundness, truth tables, Venn diagrams, syllogisms, and logical symbolism. Basic Skills 5 – Logic.

PHIL 202. Global Ethics (5). Examine some main traditions of ethics, such as Christian ethics, Buddhist ethics, Confucian ethics, ethical absolutism and relativism, utilitarianism, deontology, and feminist ethics. AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W).

PHIL 209. Asian Philosophy (5). Examination of selected classical and/or contemporary issues and questions in Chinese, Japanese and Indian philosophy. AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W).

PHIL 210. Current Ethical Issues (5). Contemporary ethical theories from diverse traditions applied to current ethical problems. Recent ethical approaches to euthanasia, abortion, capital punishment, affirmative action, and environmental concerns. AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W).

PHIL 306. Environmental Ethics (5). An examination of various positions on the human relationship with the natural environment, from ancient and contemporary, western and non-western, as well as interdisciplinary perspectives. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W).

PHIL 378. Philosophy of Love (5). A study of various concepts of love as they occur in philosophy, literature, and other cultural expressions. The nature of romantic love, eros, agape, friendship, and fellow feeling will be discussed. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W).

PHYS 101. Introductory Astronomy I (5). An inquiry-based introduction to celestial motions, celestial objects, observational astronomy and the physics associated with each. Emphasis on stars and planets. NS-Patterns and Connection Natural (L). This is an activity-based lecture/lab course.

PHYS 102. Introductory Astronomy II (4). An inquiry-based introduction to celestial motions, celestial objects, observational astronomy and the physics associated with each. Emphasis on stars and planets. This is a single activity-based course combined with lecture and lab. NS-Patterns and Connection Natural (L).

PHYS 103. Physics of Musical Sound (4). Basic physical principles of sound and vibration; how and why musical instruments produce their sounds. Topics include sound analysis techniques, room acoustics, musical scales, and the perception of sound. Co-requisite: PHYS 103LAB. NS-Application Natural Science (L) (W).

PHYS 103LAB. Physics of Musical Sound Laboratory (1). Co-requisite: PHYS 103. NS-Application Natural Science (L).

PHYS 106. Physics Inquiry (5). An introduction to fundamental physics topics in matter, motion, electricity, and magnetism. NS-Fund Disc Phys and Biological (L).

PHYS 108. Light and Color (4). An introduction to topics in light and color with applications to technology in the arts. NS-Application Natural Science (L).

PHYS 111. Introductory Physics (4). Topics in physics including kinematics and dynamics. Analyzing physical systems using algebra and trigonometry. Not open to students with credit in PHYS 181. Prerequisites: must be eligibility for MATH 154 based on the Math Placement Test, or MATH 153 with a grade of C or higher. Co-requisite: PHYS 111LAB. NS-Fund Disc Phys and Biological.

PHYS 111LAB. Introductory Physics Laboratory (1). Investigation of topics in physics including kinematics and dynamics. Corequisite: PHYS 111. NS-Fund Disc Phys and Biological (L).

PHYS 181. General Physics (4). Topics in physics including kinematics and dynamics. Analyzing physical systems using algebra, trigonometry, and calculus. Co-requisite: PHYS 181LAB. Co- or prerequisite: MATH 172. NS-Fund Disc Phys and Biological.

PHYS 181LAB. General Physics Laboratory (1). Investigation of topics in physics including kinematics and dynamics. Co-requisite: PHYS 181. NS-Fund Disc Phys and Biological (L).

POSC 101. Introduction to Politics (5). The basic ideas around which political debate revolves and from which political institutions evolve. SB-Found Human Adaptations (W).

POSC 210. American Politics (5). Origin and development of the United States government; structure, political behavior, organizations, and processes; rights and duties of citizens. For general education (breadth) credit, a student must be enrolled in or have completed ENG 101. SB-Perspectives on Cultures and experiences of U.S.

POSC 270. International Politics (5). Conditions and principles governing the contemporary nation-state system. SB-Perspective on World Culture (W).

PSY 101. General Psychology (5). An introduction to the science of behavior. SB-Found Human Adaptations.

PSY 205. Psychology of Adjustment (5). The nature of the adaptive process and the means by which people adjust to their environment. SB-Found Human Adaptations (W).

RELS 101. World Religions (5). Survey of the major world religions (Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism), including their tenets, practices, and evaluation of the human condition. AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W).

RELS 201. Sacred Books of the World (5). Comparative study of religious thought and literature from eastern and western classics: Upanishads, Bhagavad-Gita, Dhammapada, Tao Te Ching, Hebrew Bible, New Testament, Koran. AH-Philosophies and Culture World (W).

SOC 101. Social Problems (5). An introduction to the study of contemporary issues such as poverty, military policies, families, crime, aging, racial, ethnic conflict, and the environment. SB-Perspectives on Cultures and experiences of U.S. (W).

SOC 107. Principles of Sociology (5). An introduction to the basic concepts and theories of sociology with an emphasis on the group aspects of human behavior. SB-Found Human Adaptations (W).

SOC 305. American Society (5). Introduction to the social structure and processes of American society; emphasis on institutions such as government, family, schools, and religion, and processes such as conflict, change, stratification, mobility, and communication. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. SB-Perspectives on Cultures and experiences of U.S. (W).

STEP 101. Science Seminar I: Research Experience (2). First course in three-quarter freshman science series. Students gain practical introduction to the scientific process through designing and conducting experimental, laboratory and field investigations. Students must take STEP 101, 102, and 103 to receive credit for Applications of Natural Science breadth area. Prerequisite: enrollment in STEP Program. NS-Application Natural Science (W).

STEP 102. Science Seminar II: Interdisciplinary Research Theme (3). Second course in three-quarter freshman science series. Students will take an interdisciplinary approach toward a class research project centered on a single theme. Students must take STEP 101, 102, and 103 to receive credit for Applications of Natural Science breadth area. Prerequisites: STEP 101 and enrollment in STEP Program. NS-Application Natural Science (W). By permission.

STEP 103. Science Seminar III: Current Topics (1). Third course in three-quarter freshman science series. Topical survey of active research efforts by faculty and students in science, technology and mathematics fields at CWU. Students must take STEP 101, 102, and 103 to receive credit for Applications of Natural Science breadth area. Prerequisites: STEP 102 and enrollment in STEP Program. NS-Application Natural Science (W).

TH 101. Appreciation of Theatre and Film (4). Viewing, discussing, and comparing film and live theatre performance. AH-Aesthetic Experience.

TH 107. Introduction to Theatre (4). Overview of the basic elements of the theatre arts and dramatic structure, and the environment for production of plays. Attendance at assigned outside events is required. AH-Aesthetic Experience (W).

TH 375. Asian Drama (4). Survey of the traditional theatre, puppetry, and dance-drama forms of Asia. Historical development. Cultural and aesthetic aspects of the text in performance. Influence on contemporary world theatre. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. AH-Aesthetic Experience (W). By permission.

TH 382. Ethnic Drama (4). Study of contemporary American multi-cultural plays by people of color and other ethnic groups. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above. AH-Aesthetic Experience (W).

UNIV 101. Academic Advising Seminar (1). This course is designed for students to learn about the mission of the general education program and majors in order to make informed academic decisions and discover opportunities for personal growth. Basic Skills 1- GenEd Colloq.

WGS 201. Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies (5). A survey of women’s and gender studies from an interdisciplinary perspective. Basic terms, concepts, theories, and research methodologies will be introduced. Gender related issues will be examined from the historical, cross-cultural and cross-national perspectives. SB-Perspectives on U.S. (W).